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Tag: restoration

Iconic building stands strong


In the heart of the new city, overlooking the renewed Ōtākaro Avon River precinct, The Public Trust Building is being restored to its former glory and strengthened for future generations.

 

 

Box 112 is preserving the iconic building which has graced the Canterbury streetscape for almost 95 years. The team at Box 112 is renowned for restoring heritage buildings with all the respect they deserve – the Public Trust Building stands as a fine example. Every historic detail of this landmark has been considered and respected, enhancing the architecture and feel of the Canterbury icon that encapsulates the roaring twenties.

Built in 1925 for the Public Trust, 152 Oxford Terrace was designed by one of Christchurch’s most celebrated architects, Cecil Wood. Wood drew international inspiration for this bold and grand design after a trip to New York during the skyscraper boom of the 1920s.

With such inspiration, it’s not surprising that the building’s entrance is a masterpiece, and will have steps leading into what could easily be the middle of the Manhattan, via its stunning timber revolving door (saved from the original 1919 PGG building) and into the grand 6m high marble lobby. The impressively oversized steel-framed windows, the original steel-caged elevator, cornice detailing and its feature façade – soon to be restored to its original colour – express a timeless architectural masterpiece.

Property developer Box 112 spokesperson James Stringer says, “Christchurch City Council have shown tremendous civic leadership in their joint desire to support these important projects. In a time where they are being called on for funds from many angles, it is deeply encouraging to see them acknowledge the importance of these structures in telling the story of Ōtākaro to the world and to Canterbury’s future generations.”

Awarded in 2017, The Landmark Heritage Grant of $1.9m enabled immediate strengthening works and protection of key heritage features to be undertaken. The building’s strengthening project is now complete. Box 112 has now commenced the second stage of construction, involving the carpentry, fit-out and aesthetic refurbishment. Completion and the opening are scheduled for early 2020.

“We want the people of Christchurch to have a chance to appreciate the beauty of this historic building,” James says.

The Public Trust Building was designed to portray strength and stability to the people of Christchurch. At the time of its original completion, almost 100 years ago, another local and celebrated architect Hurst Seager said of its design “it strikes a new note in Christchurch”. It’s seemingly fitting, and the same can be said of the city’s icon, entering the new ‘20s – almost a century on.

Vibrant hospitality and professional services are set make this iconic site home. Francesca Voza will bring the basement to life with a Rome-inspired jazz and cocktail bar, adorned with the original 1920s safety deposit boxes. Professional recruitment firm Graham Consulting and award-winning strategic advertising and brand agency Novo will both have headquarters here.

And for the cherry on the top, a world-class tapas bar created by Jeremy Stevens will overlook the city – ensuring the building is one for the public to call their own.

 

 


 

Salvaging a local landmark: The Pump House


The restoration of the historic Pump House on Tuam Street is complete, after an extensive two-year repair and earthquake strengthening project – salvaging a unique link to our city’s heritage.

 

 

Originally built more than 100 years ago in the 1880s, the Pump House is a collection of five buildings that once served as Christchurch’s purpose-built sewerage system. By the end of the 1950s, the plant was no longer used and in the late 1980s, City Salvage Contractors co-owner Paddy Snowden and his wife Jackie bought the property to use as a demolition yard.

The Pump House is a local landmark. Set amongst a spacious yard filled with various items saved from demolition, or bits and pieces Paddy has purchased and collected over the years – from hand-painted stained-glass windows and old movie props to salvaged timber, iron gates and church pews – the picturesque buildings have also been used for a fashion shoot and a wedding photo backdrop.

 

 

Featuring brick and Oamaru stone construction, attractive arched windows and gables with round windows, the buildings have a distinctive charisma. Remarkably, they stood up to the 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes, but were no longer safe. While the stonework had slowly deteriorated over the years, it wasn’t until the repair began that it became clear how much other serious maintenance was required.

Once the earthquake strengthening plan – designed by CGW Consulting Engineers – was finalised and the tender let, the work began in earnest, in late 2017. Each building needed an individual approach, including foundation re-enforcement, core drilling, crack stitching and rebuilding of gables. Three of the buildings needed total roof replacements and a completely new timber ceiling was installed in one of them.

 

 

In addition, crumbling stonework was replaced and extensive plaster finishing applied. Internal walls with mismatched, patchy paintwork cleaned up beautifully with media blasting. The multipaned metal windows throughout the buildings were painstakingly stripped and painted. Downpipes and rainheads, salvaged from the former Sunnyside Hospital 25 years ago, were used to replace the deteriorated or missing ones.

While in keeping with the industrial design, Paddy, who has a passion for old buildings, incorporated historic detail and character where he could, such as antique rosebricks and handrails. In addition to their own investment in the project, Paddy and Jackie are grateful for grants from Christchurch City Council and the Ministry of Culture and Heritage. “Much more work was needed than was originally budgeted for, so we wouldn’t have been able to complete this without them.”

 

 

Now that the five buildings have been fully earthquake strengthened, they have fantastic potential for future use – perhaps a functions venue, a gallery, workshops or offices – who knows? Jackie says the project has been a huge learning curve. “As well as being an important link to our past, we hope the buildings will remain a unique part of the cityscape for many years to come. We are so pleased to have played a part in their story.”

 

 

 


 

Don’t replace, restore!: Deck and Fence Pro


Is your deck, fence or garden table old and weathered? Don’t replace it, restore it! Bring back the natural and original beauty of your outdoor wooden features with Deck & Fence Pro, your go-to specialists for deck, fence and outdoor furniture restoration.

 

 

With a variety of options to fit your requirements and budget, Deck and Fence Pro can provide a quality, start-to-finish service for all your outdoor wooden structures including decks, fences, outdoor furniture and garage doors. They also offer deck and fence repairs and cleaning and repainting services for brick, plaster and stone fences.

Restoration begins with a deep clean and removal of all dirt, mildew, moss, mould, lichen and previous stains and finishes, using premium environmentally friendly cleaning solutions that contain no bleach, acids or phosphates, and won’t harm your plants or corrode any metals. These professional products can extract years of dirt, grime, mould and other contaminants from deep within the grain of the wood.

Using a range of quality, New-Zealand made oil stains and Enviro or Dulux Paints in a variety of colours that suit any wood type, Deck and Fence Pro’s trained and certified professionals will breathe life back into your home’s exterior features.
Spring is the time to start thinking about updating your deck, fences, trellises and garden furniture in time for the summer – the season of outdoor entertaining.

For a free quote or more information, contact Tim from Deck and Fence Pro on 027 349 0527 or email tim.g@theprogroup.co.nz.

 

 


 

Where old meets new: TMT Construction


The intricate renovation of a beautiful 1900’s villa by TMT Construction won a Gold Award and was the overall category winner for Renovations up to $500,000 at the recent 2019 Canterbury Master Builders House of the Year awards. Located in Strowan, the extension is so seamless it’s impossible to tell where old meets new.

 

 

The house was also named in the Master Builder Top 100 houses for 2019 and in November, TMT Construction will be competing in the National Awards against the other winners from across New Zealand. Owner and builder Tim Moriarty say the accolades reflect his team’s exceptional dedication and commitment. “It’s incredibly satisfying to see all our hard work has well and truly paid off – our clients are really happy with their home and we are really proud of the end result.”

Tim’s talent for problem solving and love of working with older-style homes was showcased during the project, with the homeowner’s brief for an additional bedroom and living room extension to accommodate their growing family – while preserving the historic character of the home.

Along with internal French doors flowing into the spacious new living area, new features include a built-in study space hidden behind a handmade large sliding door system, and a woodburner set in a tiled surround, creating a warm, inviting sanctuary. Tim is particularly proud of the handcrafted cedar window joinery, and the rimu panelling that was custom-made on-site to perfectly match the existing home and create a stunning, seamless look. A remarkable ceiling to the new veranda echoes the rimu floors. The handmade elements in the home demonstrate true expert craftsmanship.

Specialising in renovations, as well as architectural homes, Tim established TMT Construction after returning to Christchurch from Sydney with his young family in 2011. The boutique family business prides itself on consistently producing the highest quality work and strives to go above and beyond for the desired result. “At the end of the day, it’s all about keeping our clients happy, and giving them a home they love.”

For more information, visit www.tmtconstruction.co.nz or phone 03 355 3974 to have a chat about your next project.

 


 

A beautiful reincarnation: DPA Architects


A meticulous weaving of historic fabrics with modern structural elements was used for the restoration of the Rose Chapel – a beautiful reincarnation of the quake-damaged heritage building.

 

 

Standing on Colombo Street for more than a century, the locally treasured chapel reopened almost a year ago. DPA Architects was recognised for its work on the complex repair at the local NZIA Awards this month, winning the Canterbury Architecture Award in the Heritage category. The accolade follows a gold award, value award and national award for Heritage/Restoration at the 2019 Commercial Project Awards in May.

The Rose Chapel restoration was completed with Higgs Construction. Dave Pearson of DPA Architects says he enjoyed working in collaboration with individual contractors on the unique on-site challenges. “The successful restoration relied on the input of skilled craftsman and trades working together to deliver an exemplary result.”

Just three days before its 100th birthday celebrations, the chapel was severely damaged by the February 2011 earthquake. The rose window and roof had collapsed, leaving a gaping hole in the main facade. The complex restoration project involved reinstating fallen masonry, replacing structural brick walls with concrete versions, strengthening the roof and foundations, as well as piecing together and reinstalling the shattered windows. The salvaged slate was re-laid and intricate stonemasonry carried out by New Zealand’s leading heritage stonemasonry company, Goldfield Stone.

 

Other work included re-plastering the internal surfaces, reforming all the arches by hand and reinstating the plaster details. The internal walls were repainted, timber work re-stained, tiled floor reinstated, and new lighting installed. The spiral staircase was badly damaged, but a near identical spiral staircase was salvaged from the demolished Regent Theatre and installed in its place. Both buildings were originally designed by the Luttrell brothers, so it was decided that the staircase could be installed without any loss of authenticity. After more than two years of careful restoration, the Rose Historic Chapel was officially reopened.

DPA Architects is committed to preserving New Zealand’s built heritage, providing the highest possible standards of architectural services for its clients. One of New Zealand’s foremost architectural practices, it is committed to seeing some of New Zealand’s more humble buildings preserved. The company has developed a high level of technical expertise through involvement with a large number of projects, ranging from large commercial projects to small domestic alterations.


 

Quality Furniture

New lease on life: you don’t have to say goodbye to old favourites anymore thanks to McDonald and Hartshorne

There is much satisfaction in bringing a new lease of life to a well-loved piece of furniture and that is McDonald and Hartshorne’s specialty.

“Customers are often amazed at our ability to return furniture to its former glory, or even better,” says Steve McDonald. “The work may be painstaking and require absolute attention to detail, but seeing both the finished article and the customer’s reaction is the real reward for us.”
Delight and amazement was the reaction from a customer recently at the sight of her restored traditional wing chair – handed down to her from her grandmother. “The chair was just a bare frame when it arrived in our factory, so it was almost like making a completely new chair,” Steve says.
“Over some 20 hours we built the frame up again with new springs, new webbing, foam and tetron. The frame was also reglued and cleaned and the legs were repolished. And finally, the chair was covered in a simply beautiful fabric.”
The stunning Designers’ Guild Palasini Cobalt velvet-style fabric was very carefully selected. “The customer wanted a colour and style that would represent her grandmother – a floral influence, but still modern, contemporary and slightly avant-garde. With its very wide wings and the eye-catching fabric, the chair now really makes a statement as a feature piece in the home – a ‘useful work of art’ is the way the client describes it.”
If you have furniture in need of restoration, enquiries are welcomed at McDonald and Hartshorne’s re-upholstery factory and fabric showroom at 430 St Asaph Steet by appointment – phone 03-371 7500. Or you can visit www.qualityfurniture.co.nz.

Tram 1888

City’s new centrepiece: the beautiful new blue Tram 1888 hits the tracks

The inner city’s trams are iconic Christchurch at its best. But the latest addition to Christchurch Attractions’ eye-catching fleet is Tram 1888 – a handsome blue R-class with a very colourful life.

Tram 1888

Built in 1934 and leased from the Sydney Tramway Museum, Tram 1888 started life at the Fort Macquarie Depot – now the location of the Sydney Opera House. It was used on the city’s Watson’s Bay line until the Fort Macquarie Depot closed in 1955 and even received air raid precaution modifications to minimise window damage during World War II.
From 1955 to 1960, the tram was shuffled around Sydney depots until the body was written off and sold to a tobacco farmer in New South Wales, where it accommodated seasonal farm hands for 24 years until 1984, when the farmer donated the battered tram body to a local council interested in its preservation.
The restoration involved removing hundreds of nails that had been hammered into the inside of the body for coat hooks, lantern holders and clotheslines. The tram was furnished with original R-class seats before being put on display in Bondi Junction for five years. In 1993, it entered storage before the Sydney Tramway Museum took responsibility for it in 2000.
The museum shipped Tram 1888 to Bendigo, where it was restored to an operational level. In subsequent years, it was put on display in Melbourne, repainted and used on a tour around Melbourne’s tram system. In 2009, Tram 1888 was leased to Auckland’s Museum of Transport and Technology, before being leased to Christchurch Attractions late last year.