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Rising from the Rubble: RisingHolme


Risingholme Homestead in Opawa officially reopened on 5 June, when council members and the community gathered for the long-awaited moment when the cherished building reopened its grand front door.

 

CHRISTCHURCH CITY COUNCIL NEWSLINE

 

Harbouring decades of memories, the authentic restoration was a collaborative effort of determination after a double tragedy. The homestead had been closed since the February 2011 earthquake and was further damaged by an arson attack in June 2016 – just prior to its planned earthquake repair.

Mayor Lianne Dalziel says the 153-year-old two-storey homestead, which has continued to hold a diverse mix of classes and courses, was one of the country’s first community centres. The site was gifted to Christchurch in 1943 by philanthropist Sir John McKenzie and the Risingholme Community Centre Incorporated Society was formed in 1944.

Cook Brothers Construction started the restoration last February, with a partial rebuild and significant repairs to earthquake and fire damage. Etchings of its eventful history remain, such as the charring on the fire mantle and the time-worn staircase of rimu, mahogany and baltic pine.

Christchurch City Council’s Heritage Programme Manager, Richie Moyle, managed the $2.5 million refurbishment, and also instigated the balcony’s restoration to the original open-window design. Formerly closed in and used as a room, it’s now a magnificent vantage point to view the established grounds.

Richie says he felt the elation of opening a birthday present at the opening of his 45th post-earthquake heritage restoration. It was quite surreal as his vision of the fire-damaged facade was still so vivid. The centre’s Committee President, Ildica Boyd, aptly pronounced on opening day: “Risingholme is moving back home”.


 

New Central City Asset

New Central City Asset


Waka tours on the Avon River are set to become a new central city attraction with Ōtākaro Limited divesting the site at 794 Colombo Street to Ko Tāne, for the development of a $3.5m riverside cultural centre.

 

New Central City Asset

 

Ōtākaro Chief Executive John Bridgman says it’s an ideal site for the Ko Tāne venture given how close it is to known visitor destinations like the City Promenade, Te Pae, Victoria Square and the Town Hall.
“The City Promenade has proved a hit since we opened it in November but it’s the private developments like this that sit alongside it, that will make it a true asset for Christchurch.”

Ko Tāne has been providing interactive wildlife and Māori cultural experiences to local and international visitors for the past 13 years at Willowbank Wildlife Reserve. Ko Tāne Director, David Brennan, says the design of the 250m2 Puari Village is inspired by a voyaging waka and will feature exhibitions, art and contemporary Māori cuisine, and be the base for city and waka tours.

Fellow Ko Tāne Director, Mark Willis, says work on Puari Village will start around the middle of 2019 with the aim of opening it late in 2020. “With new spaces opening all the time and Te Pae and the Town Hall on the horizon, it’s a great time to be bringing the Ko Tāne experience into the central city. “We can’t wait to get our paddles in the water.”

 



 

What's in the building?

What’s in the building?


Peter Walker checks out the architectural renaissance taking place in the central city and what we can expect to find in these pockets of awesome.

 

What's in the building?

 

You can’t possibly miss Deloitte House in your meanderings along the Avon River. With office space filling up down town and the commercial lifeblood of the city flowing again, this spectacular architectural icon was one of the first developments to be completed and has, since 2015, overlooked the completion of many others.

It is an impressive structure, home to the Christchurch offices of the accounting and professional services network, as well as firms such as Simpson Grierson, Forsyth Barr, QBE Insurance, the Decipher Group and Tailorspace, and the Ben Gough Family Office, among others.

On the ground floor is embattled, and now closed, eatery Bamboozle – watch this space – whose lesser infamous neighbour is Johnny Sausage, a neat little coffee and bagel joint slash pizzeria, inspired by New York mobster John ‘Johnny Sausage’ Barbato.

Just along the lane is the Whet Drinking Room. Open 4 ‘til late Tuesday through Saturday, it is “an exquisite curation of gin, whisky and craft beer”, and boasts a pretty good looking menu, too.
On the opposite side of the Avon, The Terrace continues to expand with food, drink and nightlife venues tucked into dark, intimate corners.

Paddy’s and The Little Fiddle have takeaway or eat-in carvery foods and an entertaining Irish pub scene. Across Oxford Lane is the Bangalore Polo Club, “home of the infamous Bangalore Badgers and the most unique hospitality experience this side of the equator” according to its Facebook page.

 

What's in the building?

 

On the corner of Cashel and Oxford, under the Westpac logo, is Hawker & Roll, Malaysian inspired street food with “vibrant and authentic flavours”. Next door to that is Amazonita, a “refreshing gastronomic paradise” with a dash of Mediterranean influence.

This is the tip of the city’s burgeoning culinary iceberg. New Regent Street continues to offer more and more eating and drinking options, and the Street Food Market in Cathedral Square every Friday is very popular. With food stalls such as Nanny’s Food Truck, Kung-Fu Dumpling, and the Vagabond Chefs, one can only hope the food is as good as the names (hint: it is!).

North of the CBD, at 76 Victoria Street, is the home of Craigs Investment Partners. It is also the offices of lawyers Rhodes & Co., Rockwell Automation, EQI Global, Olympic Software and Aspiring Asset Management.

On the ground floor, looking out onto the busy intersection, is Khao San Road and Spice Paragon, Thai style cocktails and cuisine. On the corners of the building are Apollo Power Yoga (Salisbury Street) and, on the other side, arguably the most unique function venue, Beam Gallery. As the name hints, it’s a massive collection of Jim Beam decanters, memorabilia and collectibles. It’s by appointment only, so have a look at www.beamgallery.nz.

Tucked in behind the Craigs building is Casamassima Italian Fare, “real Italian” foods, coffee, wine and products. Craft beers, too! The future of food in the CBD is looking pretty good. When are you heading down town to eat next?

 


 

Stockman Group

A lifeline for heritage: Stockman Group


Shaun Stockman was born in Lyttelton and grew up in Cass Bay. His passion and interest in heritage buildings and property investment began at age 24 when he purchased his first residential investment property, a small historic cottage in Strickland Street.

 

Stockman Group

 

Now he is in the process of restoring the first ever historic façade he ever saved. The Ruby Black building, previously Victoria Black, is a well-known circa 1990 gem at 199-203 High Street. When the building was demolished, the previous owner Barry Watson had the foresight to prop up the small but pretty façade. The restoration is a project which is both challenging and exciting for Shaun. “The development is exciting for me because I am creative and love restoring and transforming things,” he says.

In 2001 Shaun became Director and shareholder of KPI Rothschild and all its subsidiaries. The group focused on inner city heritage buildings and, pre-quake, had restored more than 20 heritage buildings, including England Bros House, Kensington House and Stranges Building. The group has since rebuilt a replacement Stranges Building, in addition to a replacement England Bros House – now Billens Building. Stockman Group has restored again Bonnington House – an 1883 Oamaru stone building – and work is underway on the Victoria Black and Cotters Lane buildings, both circa 1900.

 

Stockman Group

 

He founded and continues to run Stockman Group with a strong core team. This includes the Above your Space brand which serves some 50 plus smaller businesses. Shaun also enjoys contributing to the community and is particularly proud of his role as a Trustee of Cross Roads Youth with a Future Trust; a trust that works with at-risk youth in Aranui. Along with his wife Karen, they support several other local and international charities that help at-risk children.

Shaun is playing an active role in the city’s earthquake recovery. He is on the Central City Business Association’s (CCBA) executive board; the group that drove the Re:START container mall to be established in Cashel Mall and is a trustee of the Christchurch Heritage Trust which recently saved the former Trinity Church in Manchester Street.

 



 

Architect Craig South

Puzzle Turning to Promise in Central City: Architect Craig South

Christchurch has waited six years for the 100 day blueprint to come off the plan and deliver on its promise, but the new CBD revealed in that blueprint is now moving much closer.

Architect Craig South

The plan laid out by the Christchurch Central Development Unit (CCDU) in 2012 was a bold one, based on a vision of the city’s future produced by the Christchurch City Council in consultation with the public through the Share an Idea campaign. Nothing less than a truly liveable 21st central city was at the heart of that plan. It has been a long time coming but now, in 2018, we’re starting to see it happen, and it’s going to be amazing!

The anchor projects – a cornerstone of the rebuild – are heading in the right direction and are poised to reinvigorate our city centre with contemporary architecture and state of the art facilities.
Complementing the city’s new fabric are our heritage treasures; which I have a real passion for. After much deliberation, work to restore the Cathedral is due to get underway in coming months, while the Arts Centre restoration is in full swing. Connected by gracious Worcester Boulevard, these two Gothic Revival survivors are touchstones for the city, linking past to present.

When the new central library, Tūranga, opens in the next few months, it will be the largest library in the South Island and also one of its most innovative, I’m excited to explore all that it has to offer. I think it needed to be cutting edge and hopefully it will deliver on its potential as both a digital and print hub, as well as a cultural flagship for the city.

Te Pae, Christchurch’s $475 million convention centre, is on track to open its doors in 2020 and is already taking bookings. It is exactly what is needed to bring visitors back into the city centre. By the time Te Pae is up and running, the Christchurch Town Hall restoration will also be complete with events due to be held there from 2019.
Adding to the positive momentum, including progress on the new stadium and the city’s east and south frames, is the fabulous new waterfront taking shape along the Ōtākaro/Avon River. It is opening up the river for walking and cycling, with a promenade all the way from the Antigua Boat Sheds to the Margaret Mahy Playground.

One of my fondest memories of Christchurch from before the earthquakes is of taking a day trip into the central city by bus with my daughters; visiting the library, having lunch at a café and wandering along the Avon River. A generation of young people have missed out on experiences such as these while Christchurch has been without a fully functioning city centre. It will be great to take the girls back into the city again, now that the blueprint is becoming a reality.
Our central city has been like a broken jigsaw puzzle, but the pieces are finally coming together. Plan and reality are joining up to create an amazing liveable city, whether for working, shopping, walking, cycling or socialising. The excitement is beginning to build for what’s in store!

www.caarc.co.nz

 

Architect Craig South
Architect Craig South reviews progress on the Christchurch rebuild and finds a city on the cusp of an exciting future.

 

Bealey Avenue medical complex

A healthy development: Bealey Avenue medical complex

Contributing to the re-burgeoning inner city, a new medical complex development is underway – set in a prime location alongside other specialist health services on Bealey Avenue.

Bealey Avenue medical complex
Neighbouring Pegasus Health and situated close to Southern Cross Hospital, as well as Sports Med and Avenue Health, the complex was designed by CoLab Architecture and constructed by Buildwell Developments.
Due for completion in September, two out of the three spaces in the building have already been secured by tenants – Bealey Ave Pharmacy and a national dental practice. The remaining tenancy, a generous 253.3m² space, is still available, says CBRE leasing agent Anna Morawlec.

“We are looking for another medical related tenant to complement the others in the building – it’s a fantastic opportunity to be a part of this modern complex and popular medical destination. We’ve had a lot of interest, so now is the time to get in touch.”
Jonathan Hague, of Buildwell Developments, says the unique style of the complex was designed to be single-storey and intentionally low to retain unobstructed views of the Pegasus 24-hour surgery behind, and aid with accessibility in and out of the complex.
“Developed to 120 percent of the building code, the complex is of light weight construction and clad with white cedar. There is plentiful parking and a covered pedestrian walkway provides shelter between tenancies and access through to the surgery behind.”

Regenerate Christchurch

Thinking inside the square: Regenerate Christchurch

Regenerate Christchurch has released its vision for Cathedral Square, emphasising that a return to its original purpose as a gathering place for local people and visitors must be front and centre.

Regenerate Christchurch

Chief Executive Ivan Iafeta says while the vision for the physical regeneration of the Square is aspirational in terms of design, the social regeneration of the square is achievable sooner and should be prioritised.
The design for the square includes a series of interconnected spaces suitable for public events, with a combination of paving and green areas and more trees than in the past. There is an option for three enclosed pavilions connected by a lattice-style structure which Ivan says, would provide a year-round undercover area for markets and other activities.

Ivan says the greater regeneration will need to be delivered in stages as funding and other developments allow, but delivering a comprehensive programme of events, activities and festivals will re-establish the square as a gathering place.
“To be regenerated, the square cannot remain symbolic of the city’s loss and instead needs to be a strong symbol of the vibrant future of the centre of our city. The long-term vision will provide the impetus and drive for the public and private sectors to work toward a common goal.
“But it’s not just about new things. It is about people and we need to get on with making the square a place for the people again.”
Regenerate Christchurch’s long-term vision can be viewed at regeneratechristchurch.nz/cathedral-square and the organisation will now work with Christchurch City Council to develop a delivery strategy.

Lianne Dalzie

Investigating Infrastructural Investment: Mayor Lianne Dalziel’s recommendations

Mayor Lianne Dalziel is recommending Christchurch City Council puts extra money in its budget for improving the city’s core infrastructure.

Lianne Dalzie
Mayor Lianne Dalziel is recommending council puts extra money into improving core infrastructure

Council has met to begin finalising its Long Term Plan (LTP) – the document that maps out the council’s work programme and priorities for the next 10 years and how it proposes to fund the works.
More than 1500 groups and individuals made submissions on the draft LTP. In response to their feedback, the council is considering:

• Bringing forward $25 million in capital expenditure into the next three years to pay for work to ensure Christchurch’s drinking water is safe, secure and unchlorinated. The focus for the first year remains getting chlorine out of the drinking water

• Allocating an extra $16.8 million over the next three years for improving roads and footpaths, including intersections and school safety

• Approve spending an extra $48 million over the next three years on improving the performance of the city’s wastewater network.

“We heard very clearly from the community that people want roads and footpaths repaired faster, so we’ve made changes that allow us to repair those in the worst condition sooner,” Mayor Lianne Dalziel says.

 

Additional recommendations include:

• Bringing forward funding for the city’s planned new stadium by two years

• Providing a $30 million loan facility to support the building of more social housing in the city

• Supporting a range of initiatives in the community, for example Thompson Park, Linwood Pool, Edgeware Pool and additional opening hours for Matuku Takotako: Sumner Centre

• Continuing the Landmark Heritage Grant for three years

• Fast-tracking sections of the Quarryman’s Trail and Nor’West Arc cycleways, which will support a number of schools
• Extending the one-hour free parking offer in its central city car parking buildings until the end of January 2019

• Requesting the Development Forum develops a work programme to maintain momentum in the CBD, focusing on landbanking practices and incentives to develop inner-city residential properties

• Continuing free swims for green prescription holders and preschoolers at council pools during school hours.

To fund this work, it is proposed rates increase by an average of 5.5 percent in the coming financial year (plus $6.52 per property for the special heritage Cathedral grant). This is about $2.80 more a week for a home with the average RV of $500,000.

NZIA

Grandiose Identities: Canterbury Architecture

Like great homes, great cities too are works in progress; their forms nurtured over time, built upon by generations like layers of geological strata, which has resulted in an urban environment that is rich in character. It is after all, what made the post-Victorian city of Christchurch such a striking one.

NZIA
JUSTICE AND EMERGENCY PRECINCT, PHOTO DENNIS RADERMACHER

As the rebuilding city becomes a commercial playground for talented teams to create dynamic, contemporary designs, there are equally talented teams hard at work salvaging and strengthening what they can of our distinct built heritage.
While some exciting new commercial builds usher in a new era of construction in the city, they are rubbing architectural shoulders with some equally grandiose identities.
Both the old and the new have been recognised at this year’s NZIA Canterbury Architecture Awards, with large and complex public and commercial architectural projects, innovative buildings for learning and restored Christchurch landmarks among the winners.
In total, 34 awards were announced at the Awards 2018 event at Christchurch’s Cardboard Cathedral.

NZIA
JUSTICE AND EMERGENCY PRECINCT, PHOTO, DENNIS RADERMACHER

 

The jury convenor for this year’s Canterbury awards, Christchurch architect Melanda Slemint, praised the ability of architects to produce buildings of beauty, which function well and contribute positively to their wider environment.
“What really stood out is the way architects have been able to keep sight of the human scale, and the context within which the projects sit,” she says. “Christchurch is undergoing a period of identity change and some of the new projects speak eloquently about the quality of life we celebrate here.
“The world’s best cities have a fine-grained rhythm that creates interest and variation and prevents streets and public spaces from being overwhelming. As post-quake Christchurch continues to develop, it is heartening to see that the city’s architects are attuned to the needs of people.”
All Canterbury Architecture Award-winning projects are eligible for shortlisting in the New Zealand Architecture Awards. Those awards will be announced in November. For a full list of the winners visit
www.nzia.co.nz.

Harcourts Redwood

Apartments, Christchurch’s inner-city secret: Harcourts Redwood

Back before cell phones, social media, email, fax machines and talking over the fence to neighbours, the history of multi-level attached living within the inner city was the hip way of living without gardens and lawns, minimal maintenance and a strong sense of community belonging.

Harcourts Redwood
By Harcourts Gold Consultant Mark O’Loughlin

Today’s apartments are designed to meet stringent building codes around engineering standards, structural integrity, acoustics and insulation.
Ease of living, a ‘lock and leave’ mindset, plus the sense of safety and security of multiple residents in a complex are strong drawcards for city occupiers. In recent years there has been consistent growth in young KiwiSavers buying their first home, professional couples, single adults, semi-retired buyers and investors looking to buy completed or off the plans inner-city apartments or townhouses.
The recent completion of new apartment projects at 50 Kilmore, 194 Worcester and 282 Madras Streets replaced only 90 of the approximate 1200 inner-city multi-unit dwellings removed post-quake.

We have just launched a very cool boutique project ‘Identity’ at 135 Kilmore Street adjacent to the refurnished Town Hall and Victoria Square. The 15 apartments have been crafted by Stufkens Chambers Architects to be attractive to the mix of owner-occupiers, KiwiSavers, investors and retirees, priced from $450,000 each, built over five levels with good city views. An onsite display and model is open Sunday 1:45 to 2:15 to view or by appointment. Launched late June, there are four under option already.
Our inner city is a flourishing and exciting place to live. The simple lifestyle of apartment living was never a secret in the world, but in Christchurch the secret is out.