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NZ’s biggest deconstruction


Remaining in the 72,000sqm of what once was Lancaster Park lies the last of the rubble, and truck-loads of memories.

 

 

Christchurch City Council’s Project Director Lee Butcher says it was overwhelming to see the public queue at the gates for a glimpse of the icon being striped to its bones and brought to the ground.

A new community sports park has been council-approved, with design and construction commencing towards the end of 2020.

A staggering 65,000 tonnes of concrete from the two main stadiums alone has been removed. “We’re on track for our goal of two percent un-recyclable material, and we’re under our budget of $12 million,” Lee says.

For those who worked on the project, it wasn’t just a job, but one respected for its history and what it meant for the people. “As the biggest deconstruction in New Zealand, none of us have anything like this on our CVs, and likely won’t again!”

The main contractors involved were Aecom for environmental controls support, Ceres removed seats and some memorabilia, Aotea services for services removal and decommissioning management, Taggart for soft strip (building strip-out) and Tui Stand demolition, Clearwater Construction for roof removal works, Daniel Smith Industries and Canterbury Cranes for crane supply and rigging staff, Yakka Contracting for main demolition, GE Construction for fencing and gates, and ATF for security and automatic gates.

“Especially with earthquake-damaged buildings there were no guarantees of how anything was going to go. The huge roof with beams of 48 metres long was taken off separately, required months of planning, lots of signs offs, and removal of countless brackets and bolts.

“It’s quite surreal to come to the finale.”

 

 


 

Dr Megan Woods: The Influencers


One of the most exciting projects for the city right now is the Metro Sports Facility and it’s really ramping up, with the first major concrete pour for the site carried out recently.

 

Greater Christchurch Regeneration Minister

Ōtākaro have poured around 1100m3 of concrete for the foundations of the site. This is the first of around a half a dozen large concrete pours that will create the foundation for the largest sport and recreation venue of its kind in New Zealand. It was great to see to a procession of around 200 truckloads of concrete arriving on site.

The Metro Sports Facility will cover an area about the size of two rugby fields and require around 16,000m3 of concrete and 3700 tonnes of structural steel to build, making it one of the largest projects in central Christchurch.

Once all of the foundations are poured, people travelling along Moorhouse Avenue and St Asaph Street will start seeing the structural steel going up early next year. This is just another of the visible signs of increased momentum in the recovery, with the opening of wonderful new projects like the city library.

This is also great news for the local economy. Over 300 people are expected to be working on the Metro Sports Facility at the height of construction, so it will be a hive of activity before the doors even open to sport and recreation enthusiasts. That’s 300 people with good, high-paying jobs, not to mention the economic boost to the central city once the project is complete.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Iconic building stands strong


In the heart of the new city, overlooking the renewed Ōtākaro Avon River precinct, The Public Trust Building is being restored to its former glory and strengthened for future generations.

 

 

Box 112 is preserving the iconic building which has graced the Canterbury streetscape for almost 95 years. The team at Box 112 is renowned for restoring heritage buildings with all the respect they deserve – the Public Trust Building stands as a fine example. Every historic detail of this landmark has been considered and respected, enhancing the architecture and feel of the Canterbury icon that encapsulates the roaring twenties.

Built in 1925 for the Public Trust, 152 Oxford Terrace was designed by one of Christchurch’s most celebrated architects, Cecil Wood. Wood drew international inspiration for this bold and grand design after a trip to New York during the skyscraper boom of the 1920s.

With such inspiration, it’s not surprising that the building’s entrance is a masterpiece, and will have steps leading into what could easily be the middle of the Manhattan, via its stunning timber revolving door (saved from the original 1919 PGG building) and into the grand 6m high marble lobby. The impressively oversized steel-framed windows, the original steel-caged elevator, cornice detailing and its feature façade – soon to be restored to its original colour – express a timeless architectural masterpiece.

Property developer Box 112 spokesperson James Stringer says, “Christchurch City Council have shown tremendous civic leadership in their joint desire to support these important projects. In a time where they are being called on for funds from many angles, it is deeply encouraging to see them acknowledge the importance of these structures in telling the story of Ōtākaro to the world and to Canterbury’s future generations.”

Awarded in 2017, The Landmark Heritage Grant of $1.9m enabled immediate strengthening works and protection of key heritage features to be undertaken. The building’s strengthening project is now complete. Box 112 has now commenced the second stage of construction, involving the carpentry, fit-out and aesthetic refurbishment. Completion and the opening are scheduled for early 2020.

“We want the people of Christchurch to have a chance to appreciate the beauty of this historic building,” James says.

The Public Trust Building was designed to portray strength and stability to the people of Christchurch. At the time of its original completion, almost 100 years ago, another local and celebrated architect Hurst Seager said of its design “it strikes a new note in Christchurch”. It’s seemingly fitting, and the same can be said of the city’s icon, entering the new ‘20s – almost a century on.

Vibrant hospitality and professional services are set make this iconic site home. Francesca Voza will bring the basement to life with a Rome-inspired jazz and cocktail bar, adorned with the original 1920s safety deposit boxes. Professional recruitment firm Graham Consulting and award-winning strategic advertising and brand agency Novo will both have headquarters here.

And for the cherry on the top, a world-class tapas bar created by Jeremy Stevens will overlook the city – ensuring the building is one for the public to call their own.

 

 


 

John O’Hagan: The Influencers


While it’s a scenic part of the city, the riverside section of Oxford Terrace between Kilmore Street and Fitzgerald Avenue, known as the Avon Loop, also currently features a mix of overgrown plants and broken asphalt as a result of the earthquakes. So, we are looking forward to getting work underway in the area later this year to make this section of Oxford Terrace a safer and more pleasant place to be.

Ōtākaro Limited General Manager Development

A smooth pathway for pedestrians and cyclists, boardwalk, canoe/kayak ramp, native planting and new lighting will be incorporated into the area, along with some car parking.

The Loop will also be the pedestrian/cycling connection between our recently completed work on the City Promenade and any future developments in the Residential Red Zone.

Most of the homes in the Avon Loop were removed a long time ago but we know that many former residents are still passionate about the area. While we are not carrying out any work on the former residential land, everyone agrees this project is an important step in revitalising this part of the city.

It will enable and encourage people to come back to the area by creating an easy to follow route from the Avon Loop to other key city features like the Margaret Mahy Family Playground, Victoria Square, Te Pae, The Terraces and the Canterbury Earthquake National Memorial.

We are currently evaluating tenders for the construction work and look forward to keeping you updated on our progress throughout the project, which we expect to have completed early in 2020.

 

 

 

 


 

Salvaging a local landmark: The Pump House


The restoration of the historic Pump House on Tuam Street is complete, after an extensive two-year repair and earthquake strengthening project – salvaging a unique link to our city’s heritage.

 

 

Originally built more than 100 years ago in the 1880s, the Pump House is a collection of five buildings that once served as Christchurch’s purpose-built sewerage system. By the end of the 1950s, the plant was no longer used and in the late 1980s, City Salvage Contractors co-owner Paddy Snowden and his wife Jackie bought the property to use as a demolition yard.

The Pump House is a local landmark. Set amongst a spacious yard filled with various items saved from demolition, or bits and pieces Paddy has purchased and collected over the years – from hand-painted stained-glass windows and old movie props to salvaged timber, iron gates and church pews – the picturesque buildings have also been used for a fashion shoot and a wedding photo backdrop.

 

 

Featuring brick and Oamaru stone construction, attractive arched windows and gables with round windows, the buildings have a distinctive charisma. Remarkably, they stood up to the 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes, but were no longer safe. While the stonework had slowly deteriorated over the years, it wasn’t until the repair began that it became clear how much other serious maintenance was required.

Once the earthquake strengthening plan – designed by CGW Consulting Engineers – was finalised and the tender let, the work began in earnest, in late 2017. Each building needed an individual approach, including foundation re-enforcement, core drilling, crack stitching and rebuilding of gables. Three of the buildings needed total roof replacements and a completely new timber ceiling was installed in one of them.

 

 

In addition, crumbling stonework was replaced and extensive plaster finishing applied. Internal walls with mismatched, patchy paintwork cleaned up beautifully with media blasting. The multipaned metal windows throughout the buildings were painstakingly stripped and painted. Downpipes and rainheads, salvaged from the former Sunnyside Hospital 25 years ago, were used to replace the deteriorated or missing ones.

While in keeping with the industrial design, Paddy, who has a passion for old buildings, incorporated historic detail and character where he could, such as antique rosebricks and handrails. In addition to their own investment in the project, Paddy and Jackie are grateful for grants from Christchurch City Council and the Ministry of Culture and Heritage. “Much more work was needed than was originally budgeted for, so we wouldn’t have been able to complete this without them.”

 

 

Now that the five buildings have been fully earthquake strengthened, they have fantastic potential for future use – perhaps a functions venue, a gallery, workshops or offices – who knows? Jackie says the project has been a huge learning curve. “As well as being an important link to our past, we hope the buildings will remain a unique part of the cityscape for many years to come. We are so pleased to have played a part in their story.”

 

 

 


 

Strengthening is their priority: Priority Projects


Work to strengthen Walker Court, the retail outlet at 75 Blenheim Road, is well underway and on target for completion by the end of November.

 

 

Canterbury fit-out, design-build and project management company, Priority Projects, is completing the earthquake strengthening and renovations at the site that is home to Burnsco and Paramount Pools.

Made up of four units, across single and double levels, the retail showrooms and storage buildings are getting the full treatment, as they upgrade to 100 percent of the NBS code. This includes substantial new structural steel, upgrade of accessible facilities, new roof and fire protection systems.

While work started on site mid-May, the Priority team, made up of Director Steve Brownie and Project Manager Kim Lowry, have been working on the scope, plans and consent documentation for the past 18 months. It’s been a big job, with the added challenge of working around tenants to make sure they remain operational at all times.

Priority Projects has undertaken some major ‘concept to completion’ strengthening work since the Canterbury earthquakes, namely, Go Bus & Flip Out headquarters at 230 Maces Road, Chester Street Apartments, Harcourts Division Street, Riccarton, and significant residential rebuilds for existing clients.

Since 2009, Steve and the team have been offering comprehensive project management of commercial fit-outs, design-builds, feasibility studies, earthquake repairs, rebuilds and new construction projects, that stick to the core values of priority service, quality, value and results.

For more information, visit www.priorityprojects.co.nz or email info@priorityprojects.co.nz

 


 

A beautiful reincarnation: DPA Architects


A meticulous weaving of historic fabrics with modern structural elements was used for the restoration of the Rose Chapel – a beautiful reincarnation of the quake-damaged heritage building.

 

 

Standing on Colombo Street for more than a century, the locally treasured chapel reopened almost a year ago. DPA Architects was recognised for its work on the complex repair at the local NZIA Awards this month, winning the Canterbury Architecture Award in the Heritage category. The accolade follows a gold award, value award and national award for Heritage/Restoration at the 2019 Commercial Project Awards in May.

The Rose Chapel restoration was completed with Higgs Construction. Dave Pearson of DPA Architects says he enjoyed working in collaboration with individual contractors on the unique on-site challenges. “The successful restoration relied on the input of skilled craftsman and trades working together to deliver an exemplary result.”

Just three days before its 100th birthday celebrations, the chapel was severely damaged by the February 2011 earthquake. The rose window and roof had collapsed, leaving a gaping hole in the main facade. The complex restoration project involved reinstating fallen masonry, replacing structural brick walls with concrete versions, strengthening the roof and foundations, as well as piecing together and reinstalling the shattered windows. The salvaged slate was re-laid and intricate stonemasonry carried out by New Zealand’s leading heritage stonemasonry company, Goldfield Stone.

 

Other work included re-plastering the internal surfaces, reforming all the arches by hand and reinstating the plaster details. The internal walls were repainted, timber work re-stained, tiled floor reinstated, and new lighting installed. The spiral staircase was badly damaged, but a near identical spiral staircase was salvaged from the demolished Regent Theatre and installed in its place. Both buildings were originally designed by the Luttrell brothers, so it was decided that the staircase could be installed without any loss of authenticity. After more than two years of careful restoration, the Rose Historic Chapel was officially reopened.

DPA Architects is committed to preserving New Zealand’s built heritage, providing the highest possible standards of architectural services for its clients. One of New Zealand’s foremost architectural practices, it is committed to seeing some of New Zealand’s more humble buildings preserved. The company has developed a high level of technical expertise through involvement with a large number of projects, ranging from large commercial projects to small domestic alterations.


 

Rising from the Rubble: RisingHolme


Risingholme Homestead in Opawa officially reopened on 5 June, when council members and the community gathered for the long-awaited moment when the cherished building reopened its grand front door.

 

CHRISTCHURCH CITY COUNCIL NEWSLINE

 

Harbouring decades of memories, the authentic restoration was a collaborative effort of determination after a double tragedy. The homestead had been closed since the February 2011 earthquake and was further damaged by an arson attack in June 2016 – just prior to its planned earthquake repair.

Mayor Lianne Dalziel says the 153-year-old two-storey homestead, which has continued to hold a diverse mix of classes and courses, was one of the country’s first community centres. The site was gifted to Christchurch in 1943 by philanthropist Sir John McKenzie and the Risingholme Community Centre Incorporated Society was formed in 1944.

Cook Brothers Construction started the restoration last February, with a partial rebuild and significant repairs to earthquake and fire damage. Etchings of its eventful history remain, such as the charring on the fire mantle and the time-worn staircase of rimu, mahogany and baltic pine.

Christchurch City Council’s Heritage Programme Manager, Richie Moyle, managed the $2.5 million refurbishment, and also instigated the balcony’s restoration to the original open-window design. Formerly closed in and used as a room, it’s now a magnificent vantage point to view the established grounds.

Richie says he felt the elation of opening a birthday present at the opening of his 45th post-earthquake heritage restoration. It was quite surreal as his vision of the fire-damaged facade was still so vivid. The centre’s Committee President, Ildica Boyd, aptly pronounced on opening day: “Risingholme is moving back home”.


 

New Central City Asset

New Central City Asset


Waka tours on the Avon River are set to become a new central city attraction with Ōtākaro Limited divesting the site at 794 Colombo Street to Ko Tāne, for the development of a $3.5m riverside cultural centre.

 

New Central City Asset

 

Ōtākaro Chief Executive John Bridgman says it’s an ideal site for the Ko Tāne venture given how close it is to known visitor destinations like the City Promenade, Te Pae, Victoria Square and the Town Hall.
“The City Promenade has proved a hit since we opened it in November but it’s the private developments like this that sit alongside it, that will make it a true asset for Christchurch.”

Ko Tāne has been providing interactive wildlife and Māori cultural experiences to local and international visitors for the past 13 years at Willowbank Wildlife Reserve. Ko Tāne Director, David Brennan, says the design of the 250m2 Puari Village is inspired by a voyaging waka and will feature exhibitions, art and contemporary Māori cuisine, and be the base for city and waka tours.

Fellow Ko Tāne Director, Mark Willis, says work on Puari Village will start around the middle of 2019 with the aim of opening it late in 2020. “With new spaces opening all the time and Te Pae and the Town Hall on the horizon, it’s a great time to be bringing the Ko Tāne experience into the central city. “We can’t wait to get our paddles in the water.”

 



 

What's in the building?

What’s in the building?


Peter Walker checks out the architectural renaissance taking place in the central city and what we can expect to find in these pockets of awesome.

 

What's in the building?

 

You can’t possibly miss Deloitte House in your meanderings along the Avon River. With office space filling up down town and the commercial lifeblood of the city flowing again, this spectacular architectural icon was one of the first developments to be completed and has, since 2015, overlooked the completion of many others.

It is an impressive structure, home to the Christchurch offices of the accounting and professional services network, as well as firms such as Simpson Grierson, Forsyth Barr, QBE Insurance, the Decipher Group and Tailorspace, and the Ben Gough Family Office, among others.

On the ground floor is embattled, and now closed, eatery Bamboozle – watch this space – whose lesser infamous neighbour is Johnny Sausage, a neat little coffee and bagel joint slash pizzeria, inspired by New York mobster John ‘Johnny Sausage’ Barbato.

Just along the lane is the Whet Drinking Room. Open 4 ‘til late Tuesday through Saturday, it is “an exquisite curation of gin, whisky and craft beer”, and boasts a pretty good looking menu, too.
On the opposite side of the Avon, The Terrace continues to expand with food, drink and nightlife venues tucked into dark, intimate corners.

Paddy’s and The Little Fiddle have takeaway or eat-in carvery foods and an entertaining Irish pub scene. Across Oxford Lane is the Bangalore Polo Club, “home of the infamous Bangalore Badgers and the most unique hospitality experience this side of the equator” according to its Facebook page.

 

What's in the building?

 

On the corner of Cashel and Oxford, under the Westpac logo, is Hawker & Roll, Malaysian inspired street food with “vibrant and authentic flavours”. Next door to that is Amazonita, a “refreshing gastronomic paradise” with a dash of Mediterranean influence.

This is the tip of the city’s burgeoning culinary iceberg. New Regent Street continues to offer more and more eating and drinking options, and the Street Food Market in Cathedral Square every Friday is very popular. With food stalls such as Nanny’s Food Truck, Kung-Fu Dumpling, and the Vagabond Chefs, one can only hope the food is as good as the names (hint: it is!).

North of the CBD, at 76 Victoria Street, is the home of Craigs Investment Partners. It is also the offices of lawyers Rhodes & Co., Rockwell Automation, EQI Global, Olympic Software and Aspiring Asset Management.

On the ground floor, looking out onto the busy intersection, is Khao San Road and Spice Paragon, Thai style cocktails and cuisine. On the corners of the building are Apollo Power Yoga (Salisbury Street) and, on the other side, arguably the most unique function venue, Beam Gallery. As the name hints, it’s a massive collection of Jim Beam decanters, memorabilia and collectibles. It’s by appointment only, so have a look at www.beamgallery.nz.

Tucked in behind the Craigs building is Casamassima Italian Fare, “real Italian” foods, coffee, wine and products. Craft beers, too! The future of food in the CBD is looking pretty good. When are you heading down town to eat next?