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2019 architecture awards announced


Nineteen projects, located at sites from Great Barrier Island in the north to Dunedin in the south, won New Zealand Architecture Awards at a ceremony in Queenstown on Saturday 9 November. We check out the local projects making architectural waves this year.

 

TŪRANGA

 

The awards jury, which was led by Auckland architect Malcolm Walker and included architects Jeff Fearon (Auckland), Melanda Slemint (Christchurch) and Penny Fuller (Sydney), toured 44 shortlisted projects over nine days in late August and early September.

Standing gracefully at 60 Cathedral Square (on the corner of Gloucester and Colombo Streets), is Christchurch’s new central library Tūranga. The $92.7 million five-storey building is being hailed as the most modern public library in the southern hemisphere and the largest in the South Island.

 

ROSE HISTORIC CHAPEL

 

Architectus won the John Scott Award for Public Architecture for Tūranga, which it designed with Danish practice Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects and in close cooperation with Matapopore Charitable Trust and Ngāi Tūāhuriri.

Also in the public architecture category the jury bestowed a New Zealand Architecture Award on Lakeside Soldiers Memorial Hall in Leeston, Canterbury, designed by Architecture Workshop.

 

LAKESIDE SOLDIERS MEMORIAL HALL

 

Two very different projects won awards in the Heritage category. Rose Historic Chapel is an early twentieth century Christchurch convent chapel that was extensively damaged in the Canterbury earthquakes and has been painstakingly restored by Dave Pearson Architects. Meanwhile, the Nelson House Alteration by Sharon Jansen Architects is a sensitive reworking of an early 1960s house designed by Ernst Plischke, an Austrian émigré who was a key figure in New Zealand post-war modernist architecture.

 

CHEN ANSELMI UNITS

 

Chen-Anselmi Units, two townhouses designed by Bull O’Sullivan Architecture in the Christchurch suburb of Sydenham, won an award in the Housing Multi Unit category, and another Christchurch project, Menzies POP!, located in Sumner and designed by Architects’ Creative, received an award in the Housing Alterations and Additions category.

For a full list of the 2019 New Zealand Institute of Architects Awards’ winners, visit www.nzia.co.nz.

 


 

Opening new doors on city living: Allfrey + South Architects


Buyers seeking a newly built city apartment will find plenty on the market. But what if people want something else, something more connected and affordable? Architect Craig South explores what this ‘something else’ could look like and how it could transform how we live.

 

PHOTO BY CHRISTCHURCHNZ

 

I was recently invited to contribute to a New Zealand Institute of Architects’ forum on the subject of emerging trends in city living in Christchurch. As one of the speakers, I was pleased to give a talk on co-housing and the work our practice has been doing in this area for the Peterborough Housing Co-operative. We have been privileged to lead the design of this new pocket neighbourhood over the past three years as the project has evolved. The development includes both private homes and shared facilities, clustered around a large central courtyard.

The co-housing approach is instinctively attractive because it connects with our ideals of wanting to live well in small communities and of wanting to live more simply and more sustainably.

Now more than ever, people really do want greater choice around how they live in the urban environment. Internationally, we are seeing the emergence of a growing array of solutions to answer that consumer trend. For example, ‘Naked Architecture’ offers buyers the ability to buy ‘shell space’ with no pre-imposed layout so that it can then be finished and fitted out to suit personal needs and budget. The idea is that two different potential buyers will likely have two very different sets of lifestyle priorities, so it makes sense to let them decide how they want to configure their own space.

Sparking a lot of interest in Australia right now, too, is the Nightingale model. This is an innovative, architect-led approach to apartment development that seeks to prioritise social, environmental and financial sustainability. With profits capped, projects are crowdfunded through an ethical investment model and transparency around costs and governance – it’s an approach that is proving very popular (each project to date has been completely pre-sold via ballot).

Of course, the reason why models like this resonate so well is they offer more control. Future residents have a say on key design decisions, such as how much car parking to include or whether to have any shared facilities. They call the shots on whether to have a swimming pool or communal barbecue area.

In my view, any kind of shared, multi-residential arrangement could only succeed if all those buying into it were on the same page, sharing a similar vision. As well, there would need to be clear and effective ground rules in place to minimise any potential misunderstandings or conflicts.

Could something like the Nightingale model work in Christchurch? Certainly, I think it offers some exciting potential for those interested in pooling their resources to get the kind of city lifestyle they want within a multi-residential setting.

Having held a number of interactive forums on architecture this year, through our ArchiChat Group sessions, I’m aware that many people would certainly welcome more choice in this area of urban housing development. At our next round of ArchiChat in November, we will be seeking to gauge interest in potentially trialling this approach at a Christchurch site. Whether you are a developer, builder or potential home buyer, we would welcome your input – register at info@allso.co.nz.

www.allso.co.nz

 

Architect Craig South
Craig South