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Simple but elegant


When you’ve driven every Mitsubishi over the course of a year, one thing seems to be constant – simplicity, despite this simplicity, every vehicle from the Triton to the Pajero is packed to the brim with everything you need from a modern vehicle.

 

 

The Pajero Sport is no different.

This seven-seater has loads of room, quite the step up from its predecessor and that extends upwards, with my son Tom and I both gasping as we drove into the second floor of the Westfield Riccarton mall carparking building, convinced we were going to scrape the roof!

The Pajero Sports 20 MY’s power tail gate is always an asset and great for loading groceries, sports gear or school kit on a wet day.

A cool feature is you can use a smart phone app to open it too!

That same app can also be used as a vehicle locater, operation assist and vehicle information device.

How many times do you forget where you’re parked at said car park?

Front heated seats are good on the drive on the chilly mornings as well.

The new grille design gives the front end a little bit more polish and the lines on the vehicle have changed too.

It’s the wheel clearance on it that gives it such height and I’ll be honest, I took it for a little off-road test and it performed well, both in 4-wheel drive and 2-wheel drive.

There’s a 220-volt power plug in the back which means that if you take it off-road, you can power an electric pump for air beds or a little cooker or… whatever.

The 8-inch multi-functional display is adaptable for what you want to prioritise and, as always, Apple Car Play makes it easy on the iPhone user.

The sensor technology is also great, with a reversing camera and three-dimensional display so you know exactly where your car is in relation to curbs and obstacles.

There’s nothing worse than damaging your precious alloy wheels on curbs and this function will help you avoid this.

You’ll find 135kW of power and a whopping 437 Nm of torque on this beast, so towing the boat won’t ever be a problem.

Mitsubishi has a real knack for refining all the necessities into a simple but elegant package.

All that even comes at a good price, currently $59,000 plus on roads.

I could wax lyrical about the little details about the Pajero Sport but at the end of day, Mitsubishi really does have a version of the SUV/Utility vehicle for everyone.

What do YOU need?


 

A luxury lifesaver


FORTUNATE TO HAVE THE MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SPORT FOR TWO WEEKS, I REALLY GOT TO USE IT TO ITS FULL CAPACITY.

 

It’s one thing getting to drive something small and sporty, but when push comes to shove, the opportunity to take on a seven-seater with heaps of space ended up being a lifesaver.

Throw the seats down and you’ve got an extreme amount of space to carry everything you could possibly need.

Taking a group of friends to Diamond Harbour’s Sunday music festival, there was plenty of room for picnics and people.

That’s also where the 4×4 comes in handy, crossing paddocks and rough terrain with ease.

It’s also when you figure out how stable she stays fully loaded on the open road, just how pleasant the sunroof is, that the automatic boot is a godsend when trying to juggle picnic baskets and gear, and that power and simplicity of design make for a great experience, not just a good one.

Can you believe that all this comes in at under $39,900 without on-road costs?

I really pushed the boat out sharing the experience with family and friends, but it was such a good one, with the comments of those that joined me including “Oh this is nice” or “It feels great in the back!”

Now I’ve driven 7-seaters that cost four times as much in the last few months, but if you’re looking for a great looking seven-seater family option with class, you’ve found it here.


 

Fun with power


THE MITSUBISHI 20MY OUTLANDER HAS BEEN ONE OF THE MOST SURPRISINGLY ENJOYABLE DRIVES I’VE HAD THIS YEAR.

 

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) gave a range of 55km and the average person drive 32kn a day in Christchurch, according to Christchurch Mitsubishi Fleet Sales Manager David Boyce. The sunroof was great and the drive was fantastic.

So I was looking forward to moving into the ASX VRX. 2.4L in Sunshine Orange.

No sunroof but a moonroof option – most of the roof is glass! Priced at $34,990 with cool alloy pedals and 18-inch alloy rims, plus 125kW and 226 Nm, it gave me a wee thrill to drive.

It also has some cool little fender side guards, Apple Car Play with six speakers, and elegant leather seating.

Now this is the top model with the lesser versions, the LS and XLS, coming in with a bit less flash and grunt but overall its got a pretty great feel to it…. other than Sunshine Orange. I mean I know it’s a press model, but as someone said, you have to be brave to drive that colour.

There’s also LED lighting and an 8-inch touch screen which, coming in at that price, equates to a lot of bang for your buck.

The piano black and satin grille is nice, and I like the lighting set up. It’s a bit old fashioned with a manual handbrake but then again, I’m a bit old too.

Yes the Outlander 20MY PHEV may have stolen my heart for a fun, well-powered SUV in a hybrid model, but I’m not complaining about the ASX…. just the colour. It’s time to take it for a test drive!


 

As good as it gets


Mitsubishi is renowned for being a solid, sturdy build – especially when it comes to their Outlander range.

 

 

It’s increasingly going from a rural vehicle to an urban one; ideal for the family that needs something to tow the boat, caravan, jet ski or bikes. The new PHV has increased handling, power and off-road capabilities; its 2.4L engine delivers to even the most discerning SUV expert.

As a hybrid, its EV range is up to 55km. There is a fast-charge option and it’s ideal if you want a day-to-day vehicle that is electric, but with the peace of mind that you can flick to fuel should you need to.

With a starting price of $52,990 it provides a lot of bang for buck when it comes to an SUV with real off-road capabilities. A fleet vehicle for quite a few companies, it’s an SUV that can be relied on to get the job done, which is why it’s an award-winner.

Style-wise it’s got some fine lines and the interior is as good as it gets. With 130kW and 332Nm of torque there’s nothing I can say that’s bad about it. It handles well and has great hybrid performance in day-to-day running. Mitsubishi, you just keep getting better.

 


 

Beast Mode


I was at Mitsubishi in Moorhouse Avenue picking up the new Mitsubishi Triton VRX. As you would see in their marketing, it’s “In Beast Mode” and with a price point starting at $49,990.

 

 

With all the grunt of a great off-roader, the price point is quite exceptional. I had to ask Dave Boyce from Mitsubishi some pretty pointed questions. What are the four features that make it a stand out? “Just four?!,” he laughs. “Styling; it has a great look now, when it was polarising before. Ride quality; it is really quiet and smooth for a ute. Safety; it is class leading on things that count like safety and value for money. There are lots of little things as well; economy, turning circle, Apple Car Play and reverse camera in most models etc. Oh, and warranty. That’s a ‘salesman’s four’,” he laughs.

What’s next for David Boyce at Mitsubishi? “I have a few years left in me and have had the privilege of seeing the network and friendships I have built up consistently coming back and generationally getting smarter about vehicles and business decisions involving them.
“Personally, a focus on family, friends and company. Fishing; fishing is good. I am very lucky I have a dynamic and accomplished partner in life, talented kids and a busy work life.”

 

 

What’s coming from Mitsubishi that we can get excited about? “Our focus and effort is on our new Triton. It is a game-changer. But the big news I just learned is of a definite van return. Mitsubishi is part of a larger global alliance with Nissan and Renault. Expect value, safety and a big impact.

“Don’t ask me when because I don’t know. I suspect 2020. Mitsubishi is on the rise, Triton is match-winner; a new van is a game-changer. There are strong styling innovations as models constantly upgrade but is all in a background of one of Mitsubishi’s core principles – value. That isn’t to say just lowest price but it does mean the combination of features and benefits, particularly safety, economy and warranty delivered at excellent value. That is why we, for instance, can lease our Triton so well.”

The Triton handled exceptionally well and, even though David told me I could go up to 45 degrees using one of the four different differential modes, I managed not to damage it. With 3.5 towing capacity and massive cab space with a great tray for transporting anything, I can see it being a useful beast.


 

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

A Happy Hybrid: Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV


Like a long awaited follow up to a band’s first big album, the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is back. In 2014, I had the opportunity to be amongst the first in the country to drive the original Outlander PHEV and, for the time, the plug-in electric hybrid SUV had no equal. Now, with EVs and plug in hybrids becoming a common sight on our roads, can the Outlander PHEV still cut it? Mitsubishi NZ lent me a PHEV over the Christmas and New Year period to find out.

 

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

 

The new PHEV consists of two spec levels, the XLS at $60,990 and the range-topping VRX at a very special current price of $55,990. Both the XLS and VRX have a good selection of standard kit on hand. Features like adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning and a reversing camera are much appreciated. Inside you get push button start, keyless entry, dual zone climate control and rain sensing wipers. A clear and concise 7’’ touchscreen Infotainment system supports Apple CarPlay & Android Auto and Bluetooth Connectivity too.

The VRX comes with leather heated electric seats, LED headlights, power tailgate, front and rear parking sensors, blind spot warning, lane change assist, multi around view monitor, rear cross traffic alert and ultra-mis-acceleration mitigation system.
The direct drive plug-in electric and petrol set up makes a welcome return. Both XLS and VRX come with Mitsubishi’s 2.0-litre DOHC MIVEC Petrol engine and twin motor 4WD electric drive system. Power output is 88kW/189Nm. As the PHEV has no gear box, drive is sent to all four wheels via the electric motors. The petrol engine then becomes a generator if needed.

Styling-wise, there is very little to distinguish the PHEV from its conventional petrol counterparts. Only the subtle blue PHEV emblem on the boot and front guards give the game away. The new Outlander is significantly better to look at than the previous generation.

Inside, the switch gear is easy to operate. Instead of a conventional rev counter you have an eco gauge which displays when you are using or charging the battery. A-Pillars are a tad intrusive but visibility itself makes up for this no end. Plus, 463 litres of boot space is nothing to be sniffed it.

On the move, the PHEV is still very car-like to drive. The shift paddles can be used to control the level of regenerative braking which in turn charges the batteries. Whether around suburbia or the motorway, the PHEV still provides you with sublime silent running, with average fuel consumption of 1.7-litres/100km.

While it no longer has the market all to itself, the Outlander PHEV is still a fantastic plug-in package. Plus, the VRX is pretty darn close to its petrol sibling when you factor in price. All in all, Mitsubishi has pulled the rabbit out of the hat once again with the Outlander PHEV.

 



 

Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross

Resurrecting a classic: Mitsubishi brings back the Eclipse and our writer Ben Selby has given us the run-down on it

The last time we saw a Mitsubishi ‘Eclipse’ it was during early noughties and it was a soft, wallowy coupe built for the American market. Now though, like it did with the Mirage, Mitsubishi has resurrected the Eclipse brand to showcase its latest sports soft roader, the Eclipse Cross.

Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross

For those after something smaller than an Outlander, yet bigger than an ASX, the Eclipse Cross fills a gap in an ever-growing niche market for the Japanese manufacturer.
Visually the Eclipse is the Marmite of the motoring world – its edgy styling won’t be to everyone’s taste, but the distinctive sharp angles and one of a kind tail section brings a real statement to the Mitsubishi family.
The range consists of four models, starting with the entry point 2WD XLS at $41,690 and finishes with our test car, the top of the range AWD VRX at $47,590.
All variants come standard with Mitsubishi’s infotainment system with seven-inch screen, Apple Car Play and Android Auto. All infotainment functions are controlled by a mousepad in easy reach of the driver, though it does require a frim press. Other standard features include 18-inch alloy wheels, lane departure warning, and reversing camera.

Mitsubishi Eclipse CrossThe VRX we tested, thanks to its $5,900 premium, over-the-entry-level XLS, comes with adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring, heated electric seats and a very clear and concise head-up display.
The interior itself, for driver and passengers, is a nice place to be. Leather chairs are very supportive and sitting upright makes for a good driving position. Rear passenger headroom is a tad restrictive due to the sloping roof line and 374 litres of boot space is modest at best. However, drop the 60-40 split rear seats and this increases to 653 litres.
All models also share Mitsubishi’s all-new 1.5-litre MIVEC turbo petrol engine with 112kW of power and 254Nm of torque. Mated to an eight-speed CVT auto, you will be returning fuel figures of 7.3L/100km.
On the move, power delivery from the MIVEC Turbo is linear and very smooth. Electric power steering does lack in feel but still manages to be sharp and precise. The high riding stance means you aren’t as planted in the bends and it does get a bit wobbly, but thanks to the AWD system, there is plenty of grip on hand to keep you out of the trees.
The Eclipse Cross shines best when cruising motorways and suburbia. On the former, simply set the adaptive cruise control at 100km/h and the engine just hums as you waft along on a wave of torque. Plus the addition of suspension and damper tweaks makes for a sublime ride.
All in all, thanks to a sweet power unit, good levels of equipment, and that love or hate styling, the all-new Eclipse Cross, despite a few niggles, is well-worth considering.

Mitsubishi 2018 ASX

Bang for your buck: Mitsubishi 2018 ASX review

This year’s new model Mitsubishi 2018 ASX was a real surprise to review. It’s a small SUV but what I discovered was the only small thing about it was the price, with a cost of only $26,000.

Mitsubishi 2018 ASX
Mitsubishi 2018 ASX: HOW THEY DO IT AT THAT PRICE I’LL NEVER KNOW!

For that price, one might expect low end features; the ASX was anything but. At 112 kW it had plenty of power to zip around in. It’s a 2L and seemed to be really good on the petrol too. It was a smooth all-wheel drive and plenty of room in the cabin for the kids and all their gear.
Interior seating has changed from a fabric version in last years to a funky stitching and leather trim. The rear has been upgraded too taking it from a rather ‘normal’ look to something a little bit more special. A nice set of alloys too, so overall the whole package was a pleasant surprise. iPhone integration on an easy to use 7” touch screen with two USB connection charger/audio ports left me thinking that the ASX has everything that the modern driver looks for. How they do it at that price I’ll never know!
Cargo room was enough for anything my family can throw at it. Yes, it doesn’t have the auto rear opening door like its more expensive competitors, but it would tick a lot of boxes on someone looking for an SUV and I still can’t get over the bang for buck you get from this vehicle. Good on you Mitsubishi ASX, go you good thing.