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Timber stands the test of time: Timber Tru


If you’re planning a new kitchen build, or are renovating or upgrading the existing space, the experienced team at Timber Tru specialises in creating stunning, bespoke designs.

 

 

As a member of the Registered Master Joiners’ Federation, they’ve been making quality timber joinery for more than 22 years, and have a combined timber joinery and carpentry experience of more than 50.

Whether you have architectural plans ready to go, or are still compiling ideas, Tony van der Plas and his team are happy to work alongside clients from start to finish to ensure the best result possible.

“We can help with the concept and design if clients ask for this, or we can work with their plans. Every one of our kitchens is different and clients really love this exclusivity.

“We’re also happy to work with any material clients want – from veneered timber, to plywood or melamine. It all depends on personal choice and budget. We can also organise the benchtops and all the hardware, as well as installing the kitchen.”

All joinery is made on site at Timber Tru’s workshop. “To build and install a quality kitchen takes between three to six weeks and quality is of the utmost importance to us.”

The team also make joinery for laundries and bathrooms; timber windows and doors and they can also do commercial joinery for schools or shop fit-outs.

To request a free consultation, phone 03 389 2986 or email Tony at tony@timbertru.co.nz


 

Art Starter: RESENE


While there will always be artistic styles that experience waxing and waning popularity, the artwork you choose for your space should feel very personal. Whether you opt for an investment piece or simply want to display an item that holds sentimental value, the key is picking something that really speaks to you –
or you at least enjoy looking at.

 

Styling by Kate Alexander | Photography by Bryce Carleton

 

Once you’ve found something that you really love, why not use it to inspire a colour palette for the room in which you’ll be hanging it?

In this space, not only does the repetition of the same colours across a number of different surfaces create a sense of rhythm, so do the many horizontal lines.

By painting the lower portion of the wall in the same mid-value colour as the artwork – in this case, Resene Aviator – it grounds the artwork more than had it been displayed just on a wall painted from top to bottom in Resene Triple Alabaster, which was used for the top section of the wall.

On the floor is lighter Resene Romantic, though it isn’t a colour directly used in the artwork, it feels enough the same that it still works with the palette while also acting as a point of difference from the rest of the scheme.

Smaller accessories and accents in Resene Aviator, Resene Cornflower, Resene Torea Bay and Resene Sail finish off the look.

It’s common for homeowners to want to hang their artwork quite high on the wall.

However, you shouldn’t be afraid to hang artwork – especially larger pieces – lower on the wall, which will allow you to view the details comfortably at eye level.

After all, artwork that can’t be seen properly can’t be enjoyed properly!

Get inspired at your local Resene ColorShop, www.resene.co.nz/colorshops

 

Background in Resene Romantic with A4 drawdown paint swatches in (from left to right) Resene Triple Alabaster, Resene Cornflower, Resene Aviator and Resene Sail, tray in Resene Cornflower, boxes in Resene Aviator, Resene Cornflower, Resene Triple Alabaster and Resene Torea Bay and desk accessories in Resene Torea Bay.

 

Petite Retreats


Far more than just a means to cater to personal hygiene, the bathroom is a space we turn to when we need to relax, recuperate and enjoy some respite from the outside world.

 

 

As such, the interior should be welcoming and comforting, but the room’s measurements need not be reminiscent of a sprawling spa to serve up an idyllic aesthetic.

For bathrooms that are more akin to cupboards-under-the-stairs, a few tips and tricks are all it takes to prove pint-sized bathrooms shouldn’t have to scrimp on style or comfort.

Eschewing an abundance of noisy wallpaper in favour of a single feature wall will inject a dose of personality into a space without making it feel crowded or claustrophobic.

Whether opting for a mural, a lick of bright paint or a sheet of captivating printed paper, be sure to keep the adjoining walls colourless and sparse to harness the bigger, brighter illusion that white walls bring.

A similar effect can be obtained via the use of furnishings. Incorporate mirrors and glass wherever possible to give the appearance of a larger space, and add flavour via various tchotchkes and artworks that tie in with the captivating hues and patterns found within the feature wall.

The finishing touch? Whether it’s a melange of cacti placed upon the sink or a hanging basket suspended from the ceiling above the bathtub, flourishing greenery will ensure that even the most miniscule of spaces remain welcoming, charming and notably on-trend.

Remember, good things do come in small packages – especially that of the discerning bathroom.


 

Dishing the dirt


Winter’s arrival may conjure up images of the indoors, snuggled up fireside with a good book or Netflix series. But green thumbs know winter is not the time to retire the gumboots and secateurs. Instead, it’s an opportune moment to prepare for the flowering seasons.

 

 

Whether it’s a full-scale landscape or pre-spring spruce up, here’s our pick for the handiest gardening trends, tools and tips to help you in the garden this winter

The Tip: Let’s landscape
With summer foliage long departed, June and early July marks the best time to re-think your landscaping. Perhaps you’ve been eyeing up a new spot for a vegetable garden, want to plant some citrus, or relocate some shrubs and small trees. Now is the time to do it.

The Tool: Garden carts
Move over wheelbarrows, there’s a new yard companion making tracks. Often sporting four wheels with an extendable handle, the gardening cart is gaining traction as a functional addition to your shed designed to make your days in the garden easier.
While wheelbarrows have long been the go-to for carting gardening waste, soils and tools, the flat bed of a cart is perfect for also moving more delicate items like pots and plants. Some models even come with lids which can double as a seat or bench.
When looking for a gardening cart you may want to consider its ability to bear weight with a sturdy chassis; its manoeuvrability with pivoting wheels, and how easily it can tilt and dump your contents.

The Trend: Indoor plants
If there’s no landscaping to be done, why not indulge that desire to turn your attention indoors and embrace the greenery trend of the decade: houseplants. The addition of indoor greenery to home, retail and commercial spaces is a gardening trend that just won’t quit. And there’s no better time to bring your gardening indoors than over the chilly, wet wintry months. Not only do houseplants freshen up your space, there’s a bunch of evidence interior vegetation can provide psychological benefits like stress-reduction, boosting creative thinking, and reducing anxiety. As many indoor plant parents will know, it’s always important to ensure your houseplants are well placed for sunlight, watered regularly and get enough access to warmer temperatures.


 

Architect’s own home entices: Sheppard and Rout


An architect’s owned-designed home becomes an expression of their beliefs and ideals, and this is especially true of the new home of Tim Dagg, Architect at Sheppard and Rout.

 

 

Tim and his family lived on site previously and, for Tim, the context of the site and orientation of the home are always key to the design.

This held true for his own build: the existing north-facing landscape with its mature native plantings, seated terrace and swimming pool have been retained.

With a school and railway line as neighbours, there is no danger of being built out, so Tim designed the entire north end of the house in glass to bring the gorgeous outlook inside.

Materials are low maintenance in natural and neutral hues.

The interior features polished concrete floors, a natural timber feature wall and a balustrade in natural mild steel. Black rubber covers the stair treads, with living room walls and ceiling lined with birch veneer.

Roof and exterior walls are clad in coloursteel, with some easy access areas in stretcher bond brick and in a light stained cedar.

“Our roofer was awarded Roofer of the Year at the Coloursteel Roofing Awards. The job required discussion between the foreman and me and the roofer, and his workmanship and expertise has produced an outstanding result.”

The glass wall is protected by a 1.5m roof overhang to reduce solar gain.

All downstairs doors and windows open fully, while skylights upstairs cross vent and naturally cool. “Energy efficient design is vital in a successful home,” Tim says.


 

Beachside Modernism: HMO Architects x Owens Building


Thoughtful and flexible additions to a 1950s mid-century home in Sumner, originally designed by architect Paul Pascoe, have earned Duval O’Neill and his team at Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects a place on the shortlist of the New Zealand Institute of Architects’ 2020 Regional Awards.

 

PHOTOS RUSSELL KLEYN

 

Understanding the eminence of Paul Pascoe (himself an NZIA Gold Medallist) in mid-century New Zealand architecture, the home owners knew they needed to find an exceptional architect who understood and appreciated modernist properties.

Hearing that Duval had his own mid-century home, they realised they wouldn’t do better and the finished property reflects the empathy of its designer with the principles of the modernist movement.

The small three-bedroom, one-bathroom house is now transformed into a much larger four-bedroom with ensuite and a new laundry, as well as a second living room that can double as a sleeping area.

The bedroom addition frames a new sheltered internal courtyard while also acting as the end point for the gallery link and a portal to the contained garden.

Central to Duval’s design concept is the rationalisation of circulation and entrance areas, retaining the long garden view as well as repeating the roofline and choosing materials which respected the essence of the original Pascoe design.

The addition features the same cedar boards, copper nails, door handles, recycled rimu flooring, window frames, eaves, interior and exterior colours, and overall proportions.

The HMOA team has ensured a clear division between adult space and the children’s bedrooms and play areas.

Owens Building partnered with HMOA on this special project and Director David Owens enjoyed both the clients’ and Duval’s commitment to the original architecture of the home.

Owens Building places a premium on integrity, ensuring every project represents its commitment to excellence.

“Our delivery style and our relationships with clients and designers is of utmost importance to us, and often leads to great friendships forming,” David says.

“Also, as enthusiasts of mid-century architecture ourselves, it was a joy to be part of the project team,” David says.

Owens Building relocated to Wanaka in 2016 and has since become involved in a number of projects involving passive house principles.

David and family are soon to move into a newly constructed home which incorporates these principles and elements of mid-century design, so offering the best of both worlds.


 

Nestled into the hillside: Hofmans Architect x MWH Construction


The seemingly unsolvable challenges of adjacent sites were the ultimate inspiration for NZIA shortlisted Hofmans Architects, when designing these two striking homes in their home village of Arrowtown.

 

 

Suitable for a family of five, each home makes the best of the uplifting views and embodies spatially efficient floor areas, while making a virtue of the site restraints.

The finished homes are not simply a visually pleasing counterpoint to an iconic landscape, but express virtuosity in design as well. The very steep slope has a no-build line as the top two-thirds of the site, a schist seam running through the middle of the site and a tight five metre maximum height plane.

These factors demanded an efficient design set within the lower portion of both sites.

The usual 4m separation was successfully reduced to 2m, which allowed the houses to sit independently of each other whilst increasing the buildable area.

By tilting the side wall and dropping the roof pitch of one property, this allowed the other to achieve good winter sun.

“We are always inspired by our local environment and like to use natural materials that sit well in our surroundings,” Director Maarten Hofmans says.

“The Chinese miners were masters in using local materials that came to hand and creating shelter in an efficient as possible form – something that we have drawn inspiration from. We strive to achieve simple and easily understood solutions. These homes are two simple sculpted shaped forms that nestle into the hillside.”

Corten clads the firewood storage walls and folded cedar wraps the forms, while pushed in recesses define the entry points.

MWH Construction brought the designs to reality and Maarten says, “It was a pleasure to work with MWH, their enthusiasm for a well-executed product always makes us happy as Architects”.

Director of MWH, Myles Herschell says, “the aesthetic of this project was a real drawcard for our team – the houses resemble folded cedar origami. Also, the opportunity to work with Hofmans Architects: their creativity, receptiveness to change and solutions is always a pleasure.”

The philosophy at MWH is to push boundaries, reinterpret styles and challenge notions of what construction can be. Transparency, adaptability, teamwork plus Myles’ own design degree enable MWH to work at the boundaries of architectural inspiration.

 


 

Hillside Haven: Fleetwood Construction


Specialist hill builders Fleetwood Construction receive most of their commissions through word of mouth recommendations, and the newly completed home on Cashmere Hill is no exception.

This stunning project came to Sam and Charlotte from a previous client whose Cass Bay home won a Gold Award in the Master Builders House of the Year competition.

“We thoroughly enjoyed building this home,” Sam says.

“I had a very close relationship with the owners, working with them through the design process with South Architects, and then throughout the build speaking almost daily to them about the finer details.”

The clients met a few builders before deciding to build with Fleetwood.

“We felt like Sam is totally honest, we definitely got that vibe from him. Plus, we visited a friend’s house that Sam had built and they are really happy with it. We love what Fleetwood Construction has created for us – it’s finished really nicely and feels like quality,” says owner Jessica.

The house is a mix of modern and traditional design, featuring crisp clean lines.

Nine aluminium columns run the full height of both floors, making the home feel grand and telling a strong architectural story.

Signature touches abound, starting with the blush pink front door which hints at the stylish interior throughout and leads to the kitchen/living area with its stunning views, balcony, and custom balustrade.

“The team really enjoyed seeing all of the finishing details come together at the end, when the build became a home for our excited owners,” Sam says.


 

Pretty in Pink: RESENE


It has been the darling of recent times – millennial pink has appeared in all walks of life from clothing (men’s and women’s), products, accessories, hair and makeup, and interiors.

It’s a colour that may not be going away anytime soon but the sweeter truer shades of pink we’ve been seeing in recent years are morphing in two directions – to dusky peach/nudes and to soft fresh lilacs.

In this room, using two muted peachy pinks together means that the space doesn’t become overpowering.

The lighter colour, Resene Sorbet, is used as a neutral, leaving the darker colour Resene Just Dance, as a feature wall to frame the white linen sofa.

Adding to the soft, weathered look is a distressed floor where Resene Poured Milk is used over a basecoat of Resene Rebel, then sanded back in random areas.

The pendant light is in Resene Despacito, the tall vase is Resene Irresistible and the small vase is in Resene Rose Gold, a new metallic from Resene.

As with millennial pink, this newer colour is not one specific colour but can be many.

Think salmon, wafer, biscuit, nude and pale coral. In combination, these colours are like a pale, glorious sunset.

The surge of smoky pink and peach into our current culture has opened the door for androgynous and adult pinks of so many different shades.

It’s gentle, compassionate, composed, free-spirited nurturing and youthful.

It can be used as an accent colour or as a neutral depending on which version of the colour you choose – the muddier versions work well as neutrals. It’s not sickly sweet, but can be sophisticated, glamorous and edgy.

Paint Colours Back wall: Resene Just Dance, side wall in Resene Sorbet, distressed floor in Resene Poured Milk over a base coat of Resene Rebel. Side table: Resene Sunbaked Base of jute ottoman: Resene Colorwood Pitch Black Mesh platter: Resene XOXO Pendant light: Resene Despacito Vases: Resene Irresistible (tall), Resene BFF (medium) and Resene FX Metallic Rose Gold (small)

 

Small rooms with big impact: Armstrong Interiors


Think small rooms need to eschew style? Then think again! Metropol catches up with award-winning Interior Designer Angelique Armstrong from Armstrong Interiors about how to create small rooms with big impact.

 

 


How do you make small spaces feel bigger?

When decorating a small room, ‘less is more’.

If furniture and accessories block the view into a room, it will look cramped.

Moving furniture away from walkways will open up the space and make it feel larger. Use a few large, simple pieces of furniture or accessories in place of several smaller pieces, which make a space look cluttered.

With open space and large blocks of colour, the room will appear to be more calm and comfortable.

Positioning a large mirror opposite a window will bring the outside in and create depth, while hanging a mirror opposite a doorway will give the illusion of space.


What are the best ways to add colour and flair to the WC or powder room?

Adding colour and texture helps bring the space to life.

Create interest by adding wallpaper, mirrors and feature lighting.

If your bathroom boasts a mostly neutral design with a white vanity, an accent wall behind your vanity and mirror will create visual interest.

Whatever your home’s interior theme is, it is important to have the same continuous design flow with the rest of the house.


What are the golden rules with wallpaper patterns in small rooms?

Nowadays the singular feature wall is just not quite enough and it is popular to wallpaper an entire room.

I prefer two walls if need be; it’s less predictable.

Wallpaper can be very effective in a small space; adding interest by creating a beautiful focal point, creating depth in a room with short walls and making low ceilings look taller.

Wallpaper has the ability to be the hero of the room or subtlety to pull everything together. I like to incorporate colour, depth and texture.


How can you add storage to a small room?

Furniture is a clever way to create more storage.

Look out for coffee tables and consoles with drawers and cupboard space, while a customised wall unit will help clear excess clutter from your useful surfaces and tables.

In the bedroom, invest in bedside cabinets with drawers or ottomans with storage, beds with drawers underneath are handy or you can utilise storage boxes.


Phone: 03 356 2636
Email: office@armstronginteriors.co.nz
Instagram: armstronginteriorsltd