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The places we call home: McAtamney Gallery


Norah Johnson came to New Zealand from Toronto when she was seven years old. Her Irish-Canadian father and Kiwi mother settled the family in Auckland, and though it initially came as quite a culture shock, gradually Norah came to love living in the City of Sails.

 

In her early 20s, Norah visited Canada on a pilgrimage to her birthplace, but halfway through her trip she began to miss New Zealand. “I missed the beaches, the light – the open skies.”

Norah returned home to do her Bachelor of Arts majoring in Art History and English Literature, followed by a Master of Arts in Communications Studies. After her Masters, Norah began painting and exhibited at Franklin Arts Centre, NZ Steel Gallery, Megan Dickinson Gallery and Hangar Gallery.

It was on a visit to Christchurch, post-quake, that Norah felt an attraction to our city and eventually made the move here. Ōtautahi is now the city she calls home.

Of her current exhibition Homage to Home at McAtamney Gallery, Norah has this to say:

“I’m an abstract expressionist. Colour and mark making are my primary tools for expression. My work embraces the accidental, the spontaneous and the experimental.

“I work intuitively – interacting with the canvas in a non-critical, unpremeditated way. I seek to bypass the conscious mind (as far as possible) and engage with more subtle, intangible processes of art making. I want to discover how colour and marks interrelate in a harmonious, balanced and abstracted manner to ultimately reveal their lyricism.

“Homage to Home is about the universal need and desire to put down roots and cultivate harmony within a landscape that is both domestic and geographical. Motifs and references of Mid-Canterbury and Christchurch have consistently featured in my work since I arrived 18-months ago. My work attempts to provide the viewer with a perceived sense of belonging to a time and place recorded and then distilled in an overall impression of that experience.”


 

Lines, light & rhythm: McAtamney Gallery


Susanna Izard loves the drama of dark skies, the interplay of light and shade, the power of nature, which she describes as “awe inspiring, wonderful and terrible!”

 

When it comes to her paintings, the “three big things” are lines, light and rhythm.

Though working on landscapes for now, Susanna responds to the challenge of anything that catches her eye.

“During lockdown I kept a daily drawing journal and drew things both inside and outside.”

Inspiration is never far away, with Lake Tekapo and the stark, uncompromising beauty of the Mackenzie Country right on Susanna’s doorstep, it’s just a matter of loading the ute with her paints and painting kit and heading on out there.

McAtamney Gallery in Geraldine is hosting Susanna’s exhibition, Clarity and Beauty in a Mad World, on November 11.


 

Uber-urban art: Fiksate Gallery


It is the only gallery in New Zealand specialising in urban contemporary art, and with the most recognised names in the genre associated with it, Fiksate Gallery has much to be proud of.

1. STATIC – JOEL HART

 

It was the Spectrum 2015 Street Art Festival that brought husband and wife artists Jenna and Nathan Ingram together with stencil artist Clint Park (Porta) and curator and art historian Ruben Woods.

They meshed so well that they rented studio space in New Brighton, which organically evolved into Fiksate Gallery.

A move to the UniMed Building on Gloucester Street in 2018, and connecting with Life in Vacant Spaces, raised Fiksate’s profile, with eight exhibitions since, drawing some of the top echelon of urban artists – AskewOne, Pener, Milarky, Meep, Joel Hart, Jacob Yikes and Dcypher.

When not running the gallery and custom framing service, holding workshops, such as Wednesday fortnightly sticker making classes Slapcity, or raising young son Frank, Jenna and Nathan produce their own artworks under the pseudonyms of Jen and Dr. Suits.

Next up in November for this dynamic duo is an exciting exhibition showcasing everything urban art – from photography to graffiti – featuring the cream of Aotearoa’s female urban artists.

2. CAPITANA V3” – VOXX ROMANA (PORTLAND, USA)

 

A place of passion: Tait Gallery


Visit the beautiful alpine village of Hanmer Springs, park your car and take a stroll up Conical Hill Road to Tait Gallery. Take time to browse and chat to the gallery owner, William Taylor – his passion for the arts is infectious and his gallery is full of colour and vitality. You may even meet some of the artists in person during your stay!

 

ALETHEA TSE-ROCHE – ARROWTOWN RIVER

 

William enthusiastically describes Hanmer Springs as, “the cultural centre of the South Island”.

The village might be small, but it boasts two very fine art galleries, one of them being Tait Gallery, which opened three years ago and quickly became known as a sought-after destination. “We represent over 50 different artists and display a wide range of mediums at affordable prices,” William says.

He loves to promote established and emerging artists in the space and it’s not just for the adults; there’s also a children’s section for those between 8-15 years old.

The gallery also has a varied selection of exquisite glassware, sculptures, pottery, wood turning, ceramics and jewellery.

This gorgeous place of passion is just another addition to the must-sees of Hanmer Springs which make it a hotspot of the South Island.

Tait Gallery is located at 34 Conical Hill Road and open Thursday to Tuesday 10am to 4pm. For more information, phone 027 432 5914 or email info@taitgallery.co.nz.


 

From Marlborough to Mauritius: Windsor Gallery


Outstanding artworks by Anneke Bester and Rhonye McIlroy are showcased in the 18 May – 13 June exhibition at Windsor Gallery.

 

 

A follower of the neo-renaissance movement, Anneke has been painting and sculpting since she was 16 years old.

She has sculpted commercial commissions for hotel projects in South Africa, Mauritius and Dubai (including sculpting eight bronze life-size falcons for the Dubai Mall), and has also sculpted for the Chronicles of Narnia movie. Her exhibition is titled Sister Water.

Rhonye McIlroy’s background was originally fashion based. Her love for fashion, especially the top hat, has become her trademark in most of her paintings since 2011, which detailed many aspects of early New Zealand colonial history.

Current work explores Rhonye’s ancestors John and Elizabeth Guard, pioneers of New Zealand’s shore-based whaling industry in the Marlborough Sounds.

Rhonye’s exhibition is titled Stone to Flesh.

Find Windsor Gallery at 386 St Asaph Street, phone 03 366 0724. Follow Windsor Gallery on Facebook and windsorgallerynz on Instagram.


 

Living Art


Formerly at Pareora Street, Riccarton, Bryce Gallery has now relocated out to the idyllic serenity of the countryside and on Saturday 1 February, artists Min Kim and Jamie Stewart welcomed around 200 friends and associates to the reopening of Bryce Gallery at 84 Vincenza Drive, Ohoka.

 

Their vision for the gallery is to develop the four acres of land into a sculpture garden and the 422 square metre home into an artistic paradise for art lovers.

Already Min and Jamie have turned the concept of what we think of as a working gallery on its head, for there is no one standalone room in which to view the Bryce collection; instead, artworks grace each and every room, as well as the garden and surrounding parklands.

It is an astounding concept, but also a glorious one. “I’ve always felt that in connecting with nature, we are safe,” Min says.

“Listening to the wind in the trees here – it’s so magical.”

Min’s love of meeting new people and reconnecting with old friends has prompted the opening of an Air B&B in March; it’s a heavenly way for guests to experience that magic for themselves and revel in the beauty that’s truly all around them.

“Bryce Gallery’s relocation is very much about my giving back to the artistic society, because my clients have fed my soul,” Min says.

“I want to know who has bought my art and why – what it means to them.”

Find Bryce Gallery at 84 Vincenza Drive, Ohoka.


 

Gauguin in Aotearoa


An exhibition showcasing the works of artists Gabriel Heimler and Anna Proc is soon to open at McAtamney Gallery in Geraldine.

 

 

Titled Gauguin in Aotearoa, the exhibition features a series of paintings inspired by a time when French post-impressionist artist, Paul Gauguin had a ten day stopover in Auckland in 1895, en route to Tahiti.

Gauguin visited the Auckland Museum and, discovering the then newly-opened Māori Art wing, immersed himself in studying and making sketches of the artworks on display.

“Gauguin was a world-citizen; he was half-Peruvian and half-French,” Proc explains.

“He felt himself to be already cosmopolitan and, although he lived in France for some years, he didn’t feel at home there.

Gauguin was searching for a newness, for diversity… he dreamt to find an optimal inspirational place and Tahiti seemed an idyllic destination for his creativity.”

Proc says that, like Gauguin, she and Heimler are from Europe and have been searching for a place that is new and diverse yet also rooted in its history.

“Our inspiration is to ask ourselves what would Gauguin paint if he were here in New Zealand now?

Our work also asks can we choose another country and represent it; interpret this new land – our fascination with Māori culture and that underlying female presence?

Gauguin’s paintings of women are rather mysterious; our big point of difference is that certainly, we want to celebrate and show the beauty and importance of women, but integral to our work is to make them contemporary – of today’s world.”

Heimler and Proc have been painting collaboratively for 10 years.

They work in tandem, from large wall murals through to diptychs. Gauguin in Aotearoa poses many questions, such as why alongside the Polynesian women featured in the series, there are also blue-eyed blondes, sports cars and, somewhat surreally, Heimler, Proc and Gauguin chatting in a doorway!

“In sum, our art is a reflection of our quest to gain a deeper understanding of our single and united selves,” Proc says, “Our work is not didactic; rather, we raise questions. Our process is as much one of exploration as of discovery.”

Find McAtamney Gallery and Design Store at 40a Talbot Street, Geraldine. Phone 027 305 3000 or email carolyn@mcatamneygallery.co.nz.


 

Bryce Gallery

Masters of Art: Bryce Gallery


The feature exhibition at Bryce Gallery this month is Four Classical Masters a collection of spectacular works created by three incredible artists; Min Kim, Tatyana Kulida and Nyle Major.

 

Bryce Gallery

 

The trio, all trained in Europe, are proud to be able to share this collection of renaissance inspired work that captures the beauty of classical art.

Tatyana Kulida is a Russian-born graduate of the Florence Academy of art in Italy. Min Kim was born in South Korea and studied at the Jung Ang Fine Art University and Nyle Major is a freelance visual artist from Auckland and has been actively creating, studying and exhibiting for over 10 years.

All three artists are incredibly well skilled in the fine art of renaissance painting. Visit the Bryce Gallery to view this stunning collection or discuss with galley owner Min Kim about having your own ideas commissioned. “Feel free to wander the viewing rooms and discover art that has captured the beauty that surrounds us,” Min says. “Art is the flower from the pain of training and the artists want to share that beauty with the world.”

 


Workshops for artists are also available.
Call into the gallery today, located on the corner of Paeora Street and Riccarton Road or call 03 348 0064.


 

Bryce Gallery: Min Kim Kingfisher

Great galleries: Four Christchurch art galleries you have to check out

Ladies and gentlemen, forget Paris, London and New York. The best in art is right here in Ōtautahi, Christchurch. For your viewing pleasure, we’ve gone in search of some of the latest and greatest. When it comes to art, these four favourites are exhibitionists in all the right ways.

Bryce Gallery: Min Kim Kingfisher
Bryce Gallery: Min Kim Kingfisher
  1. ART METRO: With more than 400 students attending classes weekly, this art school is ace! There’s an ABC for beginners and for the advanced student, classes in freehand drawing, sketching, pastels and water colour; there are classes in oils, acrylics and pastel techniques and, for those into self-expression, classes in abstract art.
    Children are offered after school painting, drawing and cartoon classes and the holiday programme is very popular. Do browse their gallery and chat to the artists at work.
  2. BRYCE GALLERY: Their first 2018 exhibition is ‘Nature Speak’, a celebration of our native flora and fauna from artists J. Stewart, Min Kim and Galina Kim.
    J. Stewart’s landscapes are mighty, magnificent works that draw the eye and hold your attention, while his C.F. Goldie inspired portraits are flawlessly executed. The subjects look into your very soul; their eyes speak of their stories, their history.
    Min Kim’s native tree and birdlife works are exquisite in detail and rendering. Min’s Kowhai, for example, is of the brightest, fieriest autumnal hues, while her New Zealand Falcon pays full tribute to these noble birds of prey.
    Galina Kim brings the flora component to the exhibition with flowers that you wish to reach out and touch. Her wildflowers are an untamed delight, while her peonies are delicate, yet flaunting and voluptuous. Planned since December 2017, ‘Nature Speak’ was definitely worth the wait!
    Nature Speak – 15 March to 10 April
  3. FO GUANG YUANG GALLERY: Taiwanese artisan Huang Da An is currently on exhibition until April 8, 2018. Huang is a self-taught artist who has recreated the traditional wood-firing ceramic art through a decade-long of experimentation. His ceramics speak for themselves; each piece is a joy – a wonder of texture and colour. Not to be missed!
    Auckland artist Dean Buchanan’s works will be on display from April to mid-July. His oils, typically large in size, are colourful, vivid and dramatic, reflecting Dean’s passion and connection to his homeland. Rumour has it that if you’re looking for the painting to grace your home, it should be a Dean Buchanan.
  4. CoCA TOI MOROKI: Peter Robinson’s solo exhibition Fieldwork in which delicate, sculptural forms (comprising wood, wire, paper, metals, magnets and nails) sprawl through CoCA’s galleries.
    The intricate scale of the materials also highlights the nature of CoCA’s ‘Christchurch Style’ Brutalist Architecture. The exhibition coincides with the building’s 50th anniversary this year. CoCA was designed by Minson, Henning Hansen and Dines and was purpose built in 1968.
    Fieldwork runs 3 March to 13 May.