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Sisterhood of Sustainability


Sustainability; everyone’s talking about it, but few are doing something about it. Metropol caught up with fashion designer Maggie Marilyn and head of sustainable beauty brand Ethique, Brianne West about paying much more than lip service to the most pressing conversation of the century.

 

From left to right, Brianne West, Maggie Marilyn, Juliette Hogan and Emma Wallace

 

The subject of sustainability has been increasing in intensity over the past three years, Maggie says, but she believes there’s a lot of talk and not a lot of action.

“In our industry, fashion apparel, there’s no standard to hold you accountable to what you’re saying that you’re doing,” she says.

“So it’s very easy to say you’re sustainably conscious or that you’re transparent or that you use sustainably conscious fabrics, but what does that really mean?”

Having grown up on a farm in the Bay of Islands, she has long been environmentally aware, but hadn’t connected the dots to the fashion industry.

“It wasn’t until I got to university where this really unglamorous curtain was pulled back on the industry and I didn’t like what I saw behind it,” she says.

She spent the next four years learning everything she could about how to build a sustainable fashion brand and what that looked like.

“I feel lucky that we launched in a time when sustainability was gradually growing momentum, but I still think there’s a lot of greenwashing versus actual proper work being done,”

Maggie says.

Catching up ahead of the pair joining designer Juliette Hogan and Kowtow’s Emma Wallace as part of a sustainability panel hosted by Ballantynes pre-lockdown, the sisterhood of sustainability really got down to the heart of what it means to run environmentally-centric fashion and beauty brands.

Biologist Brianne West says sustainability in business is a must-have.

“If you don’t have some kind of sustainability standard, most millennials and bugger all Gen Zs will shop with you. So if you don’t have something sustainable – and unfortunately often it’s fake – then you don’t get a look in.

“Sustainability has gone beyond ‘cool’. Now it’s kind of a non-negotiable.”

If the amount of consumer momentum Greta Thunberg has managed to create on a global stage, was created around a brand, the business would have no choice but to adapt.

So it’s consumers that need to take responsibility for affecting change, by demanding transparency and by demanding fair trade.

“And consumers are already doing it, they just need to do it more and faster!” she says.

For fashion, that means shopping smarter.

“The fashion industry is the second greatest emitter of fossil fuels,” Brianne points out. “Everyone goes on about air travel… stop buying clothes!”

And even if the sentiment seems detrimental to her own luxury fashion label, Maggie not only agrees with it, but it forms the basis of the Maggie Marilyn brand philosophy – one which sees slow fashion as the way of the future.

“It’s not just about being in business to sell Maggie Marilyn clothes, but to change the conversation and, in turn, change our industry.”

With unsustainable options becoming cheaper than ever before, it’s about educating consumers about buying less, but buying well, with the value of re-sale and product lifespan making up the difference in price point.

“It’s not actually the people who can’t afford designer clothing that’s the issue,” Maggie says.

“It’s the girl who goes to H&M and Zara and gets a new dress every Friday night, who could actually afford to buy a more consciously made product; it’s the consumer that’s the issue.

“It’s about changing a whole mindset of mass consumption that we’ve just been in for the last 40 years. We’re not going to unwind the situation in five minutes and that’s something I have to remind myself of because I’m incredibly impatient!”

Over four years in business, the goal post has shifted for Maggie from what she thought a sustainably conscious brand would look like to where the label is now.

What she thought would be all about building a transparent supply chain, using fabrics that had the least negative environmental impact, and supporting and building a community of manufacturing in New Zealand, has expanded to measuring carbon emissions, to educating customers on garment care and after-life.

“Fifty percent of the impact clothing has from an environmental perspective is actually done after the customer buys it, so how they care for their clothes and what happens to that clothing once they’ve fallen out of love with it.”

You’ll find garment care instructions on the brand’s website, detailing how best to look after your beloved pieces.

“Start by getting rid of your tumble drier! That’s a way to ruin absolutely everything that you own. Gentle machine-washing clothes, hanging them in the sun… all those things can make a huge difference. Sometimes it’s small, incremental changes that can make the biggest difference.”

Maggie’s new line, launched at the end of last year, is intended to become fully circular in time.

“It’s designed to have a take-back scheme whereby the fabrics can be shredded down and repurposed into new fabrics and then into new garments, so eventually in our Utopian model of a brand, we wont use any virgin resources.”

Ethique’s products are already completely circular.
They are fully biodegradable, so if a packaged bar fell out the bathroom window, both the product and packaging would rapidly break down into something that plants can use to regrow.

Although naked products would be superior, retailers won’t allow naked stock, so Brianne has the next best thing – packaging made in New Zealand from sustainably-sourced stock.

“For every tree they cut down, they plant two,” she says. “

Ethique is also carbon neutral, double offsetting any travel.

They’re working towards sea-freighting everything in the future, along with opening up warehouses in the UK, Australia and US to minimise the affects of global distribution.

She’s passionate about her fair trade and charitable partnerships, with the company donating 20 percent of its profits to charity every year; a figure that’s soon to double.

There are also some exciting carbon emissions plans Brianne is looking forward to announcing soon.

Meanwhile a circular business is also in sight for Maggie.

“It’s definitely our Northern Star to be a fully circular business and it’s not going to happen in five minutes; there are huge complexities to doing that in our main line and we are figuring it out with this new line we launched last year.

“Circularity is really key to being a fully sustainable brand and ultimately have a regenerative impact, so that’s the goal.”

 

Marian Johnson: The Influencers


If the theme of the last few months has been startup and innovation funding, then the theme of the last few weeks has been Celebration, with a capital “C”.

 

Ministry of Awesome Chief Awesome Officer

This month the business community is celebrating twice, with two phenomenal black tie events: the Westpac Champion Awards and the Deloitte Fast 50 Awards. Both awards show a nominee list replete with companies using innovation as a clear differentiator in their competitive sector.

At the Westpac Champion Awards, 15 fantastic organisations won for their category with three of those winners clearly targeting a global market with ‘born in Canterbury’ entrepreneurship and innovation.

Supreme Award winners Ethique – a zero waste beauty brand – and Taska Prosthetics – creators of the world’s first waterproof prosthetic hand, are targeting the lucrative US market.

Meanwhile, Medsaland have already had some success there; it has just opened up new markets in the US and the UK. Medsalv, the winner of the Businesses for Good category, has only recently emerged from the UC’s Summer Startup programme with their business that drives environmental sustainability in healthcare through recycling single-use medical equipment.

The second glittery business awards show set in Christchurch this month was the Deloitte Fast 50 awards which showcases the 50 top fastest-growing companies in our region. The award celebration was held at the Isaac Theatre Royal and – once again – the nominees feature recent startups and clearly underline the role that innovation is playing in our changing business landscape.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Leeann Watson: The Influencers


We were so excited to bring the Westpac Champion Business Awards to Canterbury once again – and what a night it was!

 

Canterbury Employers’ Chamber of Commerce Chief Executive

Both of our Supreme Winners demonstrate the innovation and adaptability Canterbury has become known for – Ethique aims to rid the cosmetics industry of plastic bottles and make beauty eco-friendly; TASKA produces the world’s first waterproof myoelectric prosthetic hand, designed to restore ability and confidence for amputees worldwide.

These organisations aren’t just leading the way in our city or even our country – they are world-leading, and we’re proud to have them as Canterbury businesses.

The black-tie event was delivered to over 1100 members of the business community and regarded as the best awards yet – no small feat considering it was our 17th year.

We were also delighted to present special awards to Anton Matthews from FUSH who was recognised with the Emerging Business Leader Award for his dedication to revitalising te reo in Ōtautahi, and also a Special Commendation to Bruce Irvine who has given so much to the city and our region through his commitment to business, governance, the arts and his philanthropic generosity.

Category winners included Mount Cook Ski Planes and Helicopters, Christchurch Engine Centre, Tuatara Structures, Barker Fruit Processors Ltd, The New Zealand Merino Company Limited, Ethique, YWCA Christchurch, The Christchurch City Mission, Medsalv, RuralCo, Canterbury District Health Board, and TASKA Prosthetics.

These organisations reinforce our positioning of Ōtautahi as a city of opportunity and innovation.

 

 

 

 


 

Champions of Canterbury business


Producer of the world’s first waterproof myoelectric prosthetic hand, TASKA Prosthetics, and the world’s first zero-waste beauty brand, Ethique, have taken out the Supreme Awards at this year’s Westpac Champion Business Awards.

 

CREDIT NANCY ZHOU

 

The awards were presented at a black-tie event at Horncastle Arena last month, with 1100 members of the local business community in attendance. Champion Canterbury Ltd Chair and Canterbury Employers’ Chamber of Commerce Chief Executive Leeann Watson says the winners demonstrate why Canterbury is becoming known as a city of innovation.

“Both of our Supreme Winners demonstrate the keen sense of innovation and adaptability Canterbury has become known for – Ethique aims to rid the cosmetics industry of plastic bottles and make beauty eco-friendly; TASKA produces the world’s first waterproof myoelectric prosthetic hand, designed to restore ability and confidence for amputees around the world. These organisations aren’t just leading the way in terms of our city or even our country – they are world-leading, and we are incredibly proud to have them as Canterbury businesses.

“I strongly believe that Canterbury businesses are more robust, resilient, agile, adaptive and open to change given the adversity they have faced over the last 10 years and our challenging and rapidly evolving local operating environment. We have always been nimble, but the last few years have really accelerated that process. This provides us with a distinct competitive advantage and reinforces our history of pioneers and positioning of Ōtautahi as a city of opportunity and innovation.”

In addition to the two Supreme Awards, there were also 13 business category winners, including Mount Cook Ski Planes and Helicopters, Christchurch Engine Centre, Tuatara Structures, Barker Fruit Processors Ltd, The New Zealand Merino Company Limited, Ethique, YWCA Christchurch, The Christchurch City Mission, Medsalv, RuralCo, Canterbury District Health Board, TASKA Prosthetics (two categories).

“The winners across all categories demonstrate an agile focus in their business operations. They also have a strong purpose, clear identity and unique point of difference, which is essential in today’s increasingly competitive and globalised marketplace.”

Two individuals were also recognised with special awards. Anton Matthews from local restaurant FUSH was recognised with the Emerging Business Leader Award for his dedication to revitalising and normalising te reo in Ōtautahi and Bruce Irvine received a Special Commendation for his contribution to the greater Christchurch region.

 

 


 

Natural cosmetics

The good stuff: seeking out cosmetics that are good for the body and soul

Natural, preservative-free and organic are the buzz words of the culinary world, as we increasingly seek foods which are equally as good for our bodies as they are for our planet. Yet it’s not just our food which is getting the natural makeover, as we seek safer and simpler products to fill up our bathrooms.

Natural cosmetics

Clean, green and organic are just some of the terms that have crossed the culinary divide and made their way into mainstream makeups with, even more surprisingly, vegan and gluten-free also making an increasing appearance on cosmetic packaging, alongside fragrance-free and paraben-free.
Thankfully, New Zealand and Australia are proud homes to some pretty powerful players in the natural beauty space, including Plantae and Ethique.
And it’s not just the ingredients list that these top talents are taking more responsibility over, with brands such as the Goodness range of skincare products and Christchurch’s own Lauren & Louise makeups choosing to source and supply only cruelty-free products.
Germany was first to this consumer consciousness party, banning animal testing in 1986 and, by 2009, the entire European Union had joined in. Since then, Israel, India, Norway, New Zealand, South Korea, Turkey, Taiwan and parts of Brazil have all banned cosmetic testing on animals. We’ve roped Australia in too, with the country now committed to banning all cosmetic animal testing by July 2018.

LAUREN & LOUISE LIQUID POWDER FOUNDATION
LAUREN & LOUISE LIQUID POWDER FOUNDATION
PLANTAE SEA BUCKTHORN BERRY NIGHT CREAM
PLANTAE SEA BUCKTHORN BERRY NIGHT CREAM
THESEEKE ROSE & FRENCH PINK CLAY MASK
THESEEKE ROSE & FRENCH PINK CLAY MASK