metropol » Editor's Perspective

Tag: Editor’s Perspective

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 25 June 2020


“The human capacity for burden is like bamboo – far more flexible than you’d ever believe at first glance.”
– Jodi Picoult, My Sister’s Keeper

 

Did you know that an event is neither positive or negative and that it is through our perception that we assign feelings to it?

It’s a powerful concept, because it is extremely easy to hear of a break-in and to make an assumption about the perpetrator.

But imagine if you knew of the extreme hardship that perpetrator came from; that they were resorting to what they thought was the only way to provide for the young children in their care or if you knew of the mental health difficulties, abuse or trauma they themselves had suffered?

What better time to choose to re-frame our narrative than a time when we’re surrounded by negativity?

Yes there are some extremely sad stories out there right now, but I like to think that things happen for a reason.

Because I’ve also heard some incredibly uplifting ones; people who have discovered their passion and created successful businesses from redundancy; those who have become aware of their health and embarked on a new fitness regime; and those who have simply become more empathetic and got to know their neighbours.

Sometimes we just need to remember that regardless of whether the glass is half full or half empty, the fact is, it’s refillable. And if you’re after some more uplifting content, the pages ahead are jam-packed!


 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 28 May 2020


While medical experts have been encouraging physical distancing for the past three months, mental health experts have been encouraging us to stay more connected than ever before.

 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

 

Social connection is understood to be a fundamental human need; as crucial for mental development as it is for physical development.

The subject of human connection is even more poignant for the Metropol team, as we compile our annual bridal issue.

It hasn’t been without its challenges, as we put together what is one of our favourite renditions of our fortnightly pilgrimage to showcase the very best of what Canterbury has to offer, as our team operates remotely, around our bubble families, both young and old.

It’s also a poignant reminder of the weddings that have been postponed and the plans that have changed.

We think also of those for whom border control measures will prevent from sharing those special times with us physically and especially those of us we have lost, but who will be with us in both mind and spirit.

We are reminded too at this time of the sweet sentiment that ‘absence makes the heart grow fonder’ and such is how we feel as we count down to all the big days that are in the works both now and in the future as life slowly, but surely, gets back to some degree of normalcy.

Soon we will once again be able to share those special moments with our loved ones, mentally, spiritually and physically, and these special times we’re sure will be that much sweeter after the wait.

From our bubble to yours, we bring you all the inspiration for your special day.

With love,
Metropol


 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 21 May 2020


In New Zealand, a small business is a big deal. There is, after all, more than 500,000 of them. Those 500,000 small businesses employ upwards of 600,000 people and contribute 28 percent to our gross domestic product (GDP), so that makes them a big deal, to all of us!

 

Editor: Melinda Collins

 

And they need us right now. We can all play a small part in getting Canterbury back on its feet.

There’s a symbiotic relationship between small business and community – an important one! Local businesses are the backbone of a strong and vibrant community; both need each other to survive.

The most effective way to help local businesses survive is, quite simply, by supporting them in any way you can.

So why should you? There are plenty of reasons!

For every $100 of local spend, $68 will stay local.

That’s because local businesses stock local products and use local services.

Small local businesses are also big local employers and, with a smaller footprint, it’s also the sustainable option.

Now’s the time to spend every dollar we can locally, but it’s not just opening your wallet that can support our small local businesses; we can shout their names from the rooftops – virtually or literally, if you have the lung capacity.

Follow them on social media, share their posts, tell your friends about them… better yet, take your friends to them – when it’s safe to, of course!

If you can’t visit a local favourite now, but know you’ll want to later, buy a gift voucher!

Got an event planned with local businesses that can’t go ahead right now?

Why not work out how you can reschedule instead of cancel?

And always consider a local option before you hit ‘buy now’ on that website.

After all, you may not be able to buy happiness, but you can buy local and for
that local businessowner, that’s kind of the same thing.


 

Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 19 March 2020


“Accept what is, let go of what was and have faith in what will be” —Sonia Ricotti

 

New Zealand could become a “lifeboat to save humanity from extinction” if there was a catastrophic pandemic, according to an Otago University report pre-dating COVID-19, just a few short months ago.

Although it was a fictional genetically-engineered pandemic threatening human survival that formed the basis of the report, the World Health Organisation has officially declared COVID-19 as a ‘pandemic’ and global panic surrounding the spread of the virus has since reached epic proportions.

Although it makes absolute sense for countries to take urgent and aggressive action on border control to contain its spread, it is equally important that we adopt a ‘business as usual’ approach when it comes to our domestic activities; our economy relies on it.

COVID-19 has spread from biological to financial and economic parts of our lives.

But it’s in our hands how this affects our domestic trade. It’s not time to stop going out for dinner, to stop heading to the movies, or to stop spending time with friends; it’s time to support our local businesses, while following the Ministry of Health’s hygiene guidelines of course.

It’s an unprecedented time in the travel industry and we’re in uncharted waters; airlines have cancelled routes, cruise companies have postponed trips and countries have closed their borders.

But at the time of print, New Zealand has had no community spread of COVID-19.

While it might be time to reconsider long haul travel, maybe this is the opportunity to realise just what we have in our own backyard.

Why not head into your local travel agent and get planning your Bay of Islands escape, a Queenstown vacay, or perhaps this is some extra time to plan a bigger, better overseas sojourn… for next year!

In the meantime, our younger generations are watching us and learning about how to respond to stress and uncertainty. Let’s wire our kids for resilience, not panic.


 

Editor’s Perspective: 06 February 2020


“We tend to forget that happiness doesn’t come as a result of getting something we don’t have, but rather of recognising and appreciating what we do have.”

Frederick Keonig

 

 

It’s long been said that money doesn’t buy happiness and I’m sure that no truer saying has been said.

After all, some of the world’s most financially-rich are also some of the world’s most happiness-poor.

I think it’s easy for us to forget that happiness isn’t something that is handed to some people and not to others because, as the Dalai Lama once said,

“Happiness is not something ready-made; it comes from your own actions”.

Happiness results, not from circumstance, but how we react to circumstance and the beauty of that is the knowledge and appreciation that our reactions to circumstance are completely within our control.

So in 2020, my challenge to you is, smell the roses, use the good tea set, have the second glass of wine and accept the compliment.

And remember, no act of kindness, no hint of compassion, no good deed – however small – is ever wasted; 2020 is the year of happiness but let’s also make it the year of kindness.


 

Editor’s Perspective: 23 January 2020


“I don’t know where I’m going from here, but I promise it won’t be boring.” – David Bowie

 

 

When a New Year dawns it is already a great year – we’ve yet again been blessed with an opportunity to live and love.

And, although it seems rather cliché to say, it really is a time of year that is capable of inciting profound transformative change to mind, body and soul.

Of course while some changes in life work, others may not, but the whole point is about giving something new a go.

After all, as Einstein so wisely and poignantly pointed out, doing the same thing and expecting a different result is insanity.

So whether the changes you are contemplating in your lives this year are great or small – whether it is simply to turn your talented hand to a new hobby, curling your tongue around a new language, changing jobs or taking an entrepreneurial punt on a new venture – go hard!

It’s time to give it your best shot and don’t worry if it doesn’t work out entirely as you had planned, you will no doubt be richer for the experience.

The Metropol team is excited to embark on yet another adventurous chapter in 2020 and look forward to you joining us on this journey.


 

Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 12 December 2019


While you’re looking after friends and family this festive season, it’s important you don’t forget to look after ‘you’.

Wellbeing Specialist Sarah McGuinness shares her top tips for keeping well over Christmas.

1. Be right here, right now: Practicing mindfulness is probably the last thing you’d think to add to your festive to-do list, but it can be a helpful calming tool.

2. Know that good enough is great: There can be a lot of pressure at this time of year, especially when hosting or staying with family and/or friends.

Be clear about what you can control and what you can’t, and what’s important and what’s not.

3. Be with people who love you in all your glory: There’s almost nothing better than spending time with people who love you for who you are and can make you laugh until your sides hurt.

Find time to be with those people and find ways to help each other take care.

4. Celebrate the goodness: When you get a chance, write down a list of all the good moments from 2019. It might be a list of big things, small things or both.

The idea is to come up with 10 to 20 things that make you smile and feel buoyant.

5. Support the community: There are many families that go without in some way at this time of year.

Consider donating your time or items to organisations that support families or individuals in need.

From the Metropol team, take care, stay safe and have a very merry Christmas. Metropol will be back with you on 23 January, ready to embrace all of the wonders that await in 2020.


 

Editor’s Perspective: 5 December 2019


“If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.”  – Maya Angelou

 

 

Remember that dress? It became a viral internet sensation on 26 February 2015, when viewers disagreed over whether the dress pictured was coloured blue and black, or white and gold. There were more than 10 million tweets mentioning the dress within a week of it surfacing.

While it was eventually proven that the dress was in fact blue and black (though I still have my doubts!), it also lends power to the idea that perception is everything.

I’m currently reading It’s Not You, It’s Me, by Camilla Sacre-Dallerup, who was the head judge on Dancing with the Stars NZ and is a bestselling author. She was recently in Christchurch to promote the book.

She’s a big believer in ‘reframing’ what we see as negative; seeing something in a new way, in a new context or with a new ‘frame’ around it. It’s life-changing stuff.

After all, Lou Holtz once said, “Life is ten percent what happens to you and 90 percent how you respond to it” and, if perception is reality, then you’ve got the ultimate power.

 


 

Editor’s Perspective: 21 November 2019


“Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn.” – Gore Vidal

 

 

Looking down the line-up of The Crossing Fashion Starts Here Best Dressed Best Dressed finalists at Addington this year, I was struck by just how magnificent fashion is.

It was Rachel Zoe that once said, ‘Fashion is a way to say who you are without having to speak’ and I’m not sure a truer word has ever been said on the topic.

This year’s Best Dressed Lady sash was draped over Nikki Pagen’s white, red and blue ensemble; which was simple in aesthetic and yet impeccable in its execution. In a bright and brilliant contrast, runner-up Stephanie Murray was in sunny yellow from head-to-toe. Meanwhile, for the Best Dressed Man Matt Anderson, cobalt blue was the name of the fashion game, with a hand-stitched checked jacket that he paired with bright white pants.

Despite – or perhaps because of – fashion’s increasingly casual constitution, the opportunity to welcome a much more traditional aesthetic is a welcome one. And yet, irrespective of the conservative nature of the day, we still manage to have fun with fashion, with hats, shoes and fascinators that are as colourful and creative as the jockeys’ silks.

But what caught my attention the most was the fact that every attendee – and there were 20,000 of them – was having a ball.

 


 

Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 7 November 2019


“Health is a crown that the healthy wear but only the sick can see it.” – Imam Shafi’ee

 

Melinda Collins
Melinda Collins

 

You hear about broken hearts all the time. What you don’t hear so much of are stories of broken pancreases.

The pancreas plays a pretty important role in the body, producing insulin which keeps blood glucose levels in check. November is Diabetes Action Month and Shaun Wallace, the Dark Destroyer himself, is heading to the city to lend his support to this very worthy cause (page 28).

Two of the most common forms of diabetes are Type 1 and Type 2. For Type 2 diabetics – the most common type – their bodies don’t effectively utilise insulin. For Type 1 diabetics, their bodies no longer produce insulin. An autoimmune condition that has resulted from one’s immune system over-compensating its attack on a virus, Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong condition, for which there is no cure. And, from first-hand experience, I can tell you this makes for one crazy rollercoaster ride!

I have some pretty clever gadgets which make the journey a more palatable one, including a continuous glucose metre (CGM) that reads my blood sugars 24/7 and this is connected to an insulin pump, both are attached to my stomach at all times.

They’re a bit like having an accountant do your taxes; you still need to feed the accountant the right numbers or you will end up in a world of hurt, but they take the pain out of the job – quite literally when it comes to blood testing!

So, while you hear about people who wear their hearts on their sleeves, now you can say you know of someone who wears their pancreas on their hip.