metropol » Editor

Tag: Editor

From the Editor: 17 September 2020


We’re living in a uniquely stressful time. Between the fluctuating number of community Covid-19 transmissions, oscillating government alert levels and a general air of uncertainty – the bright side can seem hard to find.

 

At Metropol we’re all about celebrating and supporting the community, and this raison d’être has taken on more relevance in present climes.

Evidence shows optimistic people are less stressed, healthier and can even live longer, so on page 10 we share practical tips from world-leading experts on how to build such a mindset.

We also share inspiring stories from closer to home, of people who live these ideals every day.

Jazz Thornton, a 22-year-old mental health advocate who, by sharing her story, is saving lives and changing the way we talk about such important issues.

And Octogenarian John Winkie who will bike across Banks Peninsula to raise money for an important cause.

We learn about a local business, Cactus Outdoor, which is pivoting in the face of the global pandemic by using its local manufacturing facilities to create high grade face masks.

We find out what Addington has in store for a new-look racing festival, and what boutique hotel The George has on offer for those planning a way to commemorate the end of an unforgettable year.

However, I would also like to extend the invitation to our readers to send in your own suggestions for stories you, too, think Metropol should be celebrating in its pages.


 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

From the Editor: 06 August 2020


“You’ll miss the best things if you keep your eyes shut” – Dr Seuss

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

 

I have interviewed and written about some of this city’s most passionate and inspiring people over the past seven years working across Canterbury Rebuild and Metropol magazines. But it is perhaps the words below that are some of the most poignant – and daunting – as it will be the last time I title a blank word document with ‘Editor’s Perspective’.

I am sad to announce I am hanging up my editor’s cap and this issue will be my last in the hot seat.

It’s been an incredible ride and I’ve met some beautiful and inspiring people along the way.

I have been part of a wonderful team of people that are equally as passionate about what we create every fortnight.

I am leaving my post in very capable hands, with our new Editor, Morgan Tait taking the reins from our next issue.

Having spent the past few weeks working alongside Morgan, I know we can expect to see more of the interesting and engaging reads that Metropol has become renowned for and I look forward to tuning in every fortnight to get my Metropol fix, just as you all do.

It will be unusual experiencing this from the outside in, without seeing the heart and soul that goes into Metropol’s production, but I know that the same passion and dedication that has seen this prestigious publication thrive for 22 years will still be there.


 

Editor’s Perspective: 09 July 2020


“Just living is not enough… one must have sunshine, freedom and a little flower” Hans Christian Anderson

 

 

We’ve just waved goodbye to the gloomiest month of weather in more than two decades.

Yes June, we’re talking about you and since you’ve given us the least amount of recorded sunshine hours in more than two decades and thrown in a violent 11.82 metre storm wave, we’re not sorry to see you go!

But then June, in all its gloomy glory did give rise to some inspirational conversations here at Metropol headquarters.

Namely, just how much more we appreciate the sun when we’ve had a little – or a lot of – rain. Because, in the words of J Cole, I’m Coming Home, “in order to appreciate the sun, you gotta know what rain is”.

If you’re bracing yourself against the cold right now and struggling to see the positive side, New Zealand has plenty.

The Pancake Rocks in Punakaiki featured on page 12 are something special in winter.

The water forced through these limestone formations makes tiny geysers and blowholes.

Follow in the footsteps of Sir Peter Jackson and film the beautiful snow-covered peaks surrounding the Lindis Pass (home to the Misty Mountains).

And don’t forget the jewel in winter’s crown – Queenstown, where everything is exquisite in the chilly months.

Staying home? Nothing comes close however, to rugging up by the fire with a copy of Metropol and a cuppa.


 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 25 June 2020


“The human capacity for burden is like bamboo – far more flexible than you’d ever believe at first glance.”
– Jodi Picoult, My Sister’s Keeper

 

Did you know that an event is neither positive or negative and that it is through our perception that we assign feelings to it?

It’s a powerful concept, because it is extremely easy to hear of a break-in and to make an assumption about the perpetrator.

But imagine if you knew of the extreme hardship that perpetrator came from; that they were resorting to what they thought was the only way to provide for the young children in their care or if you knew of the mental health difficulties, abuse or trauma they themselves had suffered?

What better time to choose to re-frame our narrative than a time when we’re surrounded by negativity?

Yes there are some extremely sad stories out there right now, but I like to think that things happen for a reason.

Because I’ve also heard some incredibly uplifting ones; people who have discovered their passion and created successful businesses from redundancy; those who have become aware of their health and embarked on a new fitness regime; and those who have simply become more empathetic and got to know their neighbours.

Sometimes we just need to remember that regardless of whether the glass is half full or half empty, the fact is, it’s refillable. And if you’re after some more uplifting content, the pages ahead are jam-packed!


 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 11 June 2020


“Everyone is fighting a battle you know nothing about. Be kind. Always” Anonymous

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

There’s a kindness epidemic that has been spreading throughout our community.

From conversations between neighbouring teddy bears in house windows and Kiwis providing food boxes, to businesses chipping in and NGOs helping communities in need, Kiwis have turned a threat to our health and happiness into acts of solidarity and hope.

New Zealanders have shown time and time again their capacity to care for one another.

But now that the immediate threat is over and life for many of us is getting back to normal, it’s important that we don’t lose the momentum of kindness, because for many of us, life isn’t back to normal.

These are trying times and many are being forced to adjust to a new normal.

“We will get through this,” Jacinda Ardern said in her address to the nation on 21 March to outline the structure the government put in place to handle the crisis.

“We know how to rally and we know how to look after one another; and what could be more important than that? Be strong, be kind and unite against Covid-19.”

We stayed strong; we stayed home and we stayed safe. Now it’s time to stay kind.


 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 28 May 2020


While medical experts have been encouraging physical distancing for the past three months, mental health experts have been encouraging us to stay more connected than ever before.

 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

 

Social connection is understood to be a fundamental human need; as crucial for mental development as it is for physical development.

The subject of human connection is even more poignant for the Metropol team, as we compile our annual bridal issue.

It hasn’t been without its challenges, as we put together what is one of our favourite renditions of our fortnightly pilgrimage to showcase the very best of what Canterbury has to offer, as our team operates remotely, around our bubble families, both young and old.

It’s also a poignant reminder of the weddings that have been postponed and the plans that have changed.

We think also of those for whom border control measures will prevent from sharing those special times with us physically and especially those of us we have lost, but who will be with us in both mind and spirit.

We are reminded too at this time of the sweet sentiment that ‘absence makes the heart grow fonder’ and such is how we feel as we count down to all the big days that are in the works both now and in the future as life slowly, but surely, gets back to some degree of normalcy.

Soon we will once again be able to share those special moments with our loved ones, mentally, spiritually and physically, and these special times we’re sure will be that much sweeter after the wait.

From our bubble to yours, we bring you all the inspiration for your special day.

With love,
Metropol


 

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 21 May 2020


In New Zealand, a small business is a big deal. There is, after all, more than 500,000 of them. Those 500,000 small businesses employ upwards of 600,000 people and contribute 28 percent to our gross domestic product (GDP), so that makes them a big deal, to all of us!

 

Editor: Melinda Collins

 

And they need us right now. We can all play a small part in getting Canterbury back on its feet.

There’s a symbiotic relationship between small business and community – an important one! Local businesses are the backbone of a strong and vibrant community; both need each other to survive.

The most effective way to help local businesses survive is, quite simply, by supporting them in any way you can.

So why should you? There are plenty of reasons!

For every $100 of local spend, $68 will stay local.

That’s because local businesses stock local products and use local services.

Small local businesses are also big local employers and, with a smaller footprint, it’s also the sustainable option.

Now’s the time to spend every dollar we can locally, but it’s not just opening your wallet that can support our small local businesses; we can shout their names from the rooftops – virtually or literally, if you have the lung capacity.

Follow them on social media, share their posts, tell your friends about them… better yet, take your friends to them – when it’s safe to, of course!

If you can’t visit a local favourite now, but know you’ll want to later, buy a gift voucher!

Got an event planned with local businesses that can’t go ahead right now?

Why not work out how you can reschedule instead of cancel?

And always consider a local option before you hit ‘buy now’ on that website.

After all, you may not be able to buy happiness, but you can buy local and for
that local businessowner, that’s kind of the same thing.


 

Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: 19 March 2020


“Accept what is, let go of what was and have faith in what will be” —Sonia Ricotti

 

New Zealand could become a “lifeboat to save humanity from extinction” if there was a catastrophic pandemic, according to an Otago University report pre-dating COVID-19, just a few short months ago.

Although it was a fictional genetically-engineered pandemic threatening human survival that formed the basis of the report, the World Health Organisation has officially declared COVID-19 as a ‘pandemic’ and global panic surrounding the spread of the virus has since reached epic proportions.

Although it makes absolute sense for countries to take urgent and aggressive action on border control to contain its spread, it is equally important that we adopt a ‘business as usual’ approach when it comes to our domestic activities; our economy relies on it.

COVID-19 has spread from biological to financial and economic parts of our lives.

But it’s in our hands how this affects our domestic trade. It’s not time to stop going out for dinner, to stop heading to the movies, or to stop spending time with friends; it’s time to support our local businesses, while following the Ministry of Health’s hygiene guidelines of course.

It’s an unprecedented time in the travel industry and we’re in uncharted waters; airlines have cancelled routes, cruise companies have postponed trips and countries have closed their borders.

But at the time of print, New Zealand has had no community spread of COVID-19.

While it might be time to reconsider long haul travel, maybe this is the opportunity to realise just what we have in our own backyard.

Why not head into your local travel agent and get planning your Bay of Islands escape, a Queenstown vacay, or perhaps this is some extra time to plan a bigger, better overseas sojourn… for next year!

In the meantime, our younger generations are watching us and learning about how to respond to stress and uncertainty. Let’s wire our kids for resilience, not panic.


 

Editor’s Perspective: 20 February 2020


I’ve long been a ‘project person’. While this makes me highly efficient when it comes to getting things done, it means I’m not very good at relaxing.

 

Even my housework is broken up into ‘sections’ so rather than feeling overwhelming, it becomes heaps of little ‘goals’ that result in a mammoth job getting done.

But when those projects start to take over the weekend and more projects than fun is getting done, that’s when I know something has to change.

In my defence, we have been smack bang in the middle of selling a house and building a new one, which is particularly challenging when you throw three dogs and three kids in the mix, but nevertheless, I’m ready for something to give in the all work no play continuum.

The world is currently suffering from a global rest deficit; we crave rest and relaxation, but then feel anxious that we’re being lazy when we attempt even 10 minutes for a cuppa.

Whether this rest deficit is real or perceived, it’s damaging. We’ve long recognised the harmful effects of sleep deficit but, until now, it seems we’ve underestimated the effects of not resting.

Yet research tells us that spending time relaxing not only helps our decision-making abilities and lowers our risk of depression, but it also boosts both our memory making abilities and our immune system response.

Whether it’s a cup of tea and a copy of Metropol, some diaphragmic breathing and mindful meditation, powering it around the block with some headphones on, or curling up on the coach for a Netflix marathon, there’s a way to relax that will be just for you.

No matter what it is, it needs to be scheduled, after all, rest is not a luxury, it’s a necessity.


 

Editor’s Perspective: 06 February 2020


“We tend to forget that happiness doesn’t come as a result of getting something we don’t have, but rather of recognising and appreciating what we do have.”

Frederick Keonig

 

 

It’s long been said that money doesn’t buy happiness and I’m sure that no truer saying has been said.

After all, some of the world’s most financially-rich are also some of the world’s most happiness-poor.

I think it’s easy for us to forget that happiness isn’t something that is handed to some people and not to others because, as the Dalai Lama once said,

“Happiness is not something ready-made; it comes from your own actions”.

Happiness results, not from circumstance, but how we react to circumstance and the beauty of that is the knowledge and appreciation that our reactions to circumstance are completely within our control.

So in 2020, my challenge to you is, smell the roses, use the good tea set, have the second glass of wine and accept the compliment.

And remember, no act of kindness, no hint of compassion, no good deed – however small – is ever wasted; 2020 is the year of happiness but let’s also make it the year of kindness.