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Awards pile up for Millbrook kitchen: Mal Corboy Design


The awards cabinet is full to bursting for Mal Corboy, Director of Mal Corboy design whose Millbrook kitchen and bathroom featured in our October 15 issue showcasing its inclusion in the finalists of the Society of British Interior Designers (SBID) international competition.

 

 

Mal has now added the National Kitchen and Bathroom Association (NKBA) to his trove, taking home the Certified Designers Society (CDS) Kitchen Design Award (open to qualified designers only), for his striking and clever Millbrook kitchen.

Mal’s client frequently entertains guests in the home built by K M Smith Builders.

So in addition to the generous kitchen, Mal created a spectacular scullery behind the kitchen accessed through electric doors, which houses a preparation area, twin sinks, dishwasher, oven and steam oven, and two wine fridges.

The kitchen itself is refined and elegant with a masculine accent. Corian in the specialty colourway Sorrel, is combined with American Walnut veneer and glass cabinetry, black lacquer, and black copper.

The result is an inspiring dramatic scene which also retains an effortless simplicity.


 

Suit-able attire


Thirty-three years after opening its first store in Christchurch, Kiwi suiting experts, Working Style, has launched its new womenswear range here, too. The colourful array of blazers, pants and shirting offer New Zealand women a unique experience to select the fabric, fit and detailing of a custom suit.

 

 

The launch of W, a new custom suiting range for women, coincides with the retailer relocating from Merivale to a modern new store next to Riverside Market on Oxford Terrace, designed by award-winning local architecture firm, PRau Studio.

Founder and Managing Director Chris Dobbs and Christchurch-raised creative director Karl Clausen told Metropol how W is an extension of its bespoke tailored suiting offerings, but now, for women.

The idea for the collection was sparked when staff member, Amanda Vine, had a men’s suit tailored for her to wear to work in the Christchurch store about two years ago.

“That was the catalyst for the women’s collection,” says Chris. “We’ve been working on it for about 18-months now.

“We set out to learn what women wanted from suiting, we didn’t want to dictate to them what we thought they wanted, but we wanted to learn.”

The resulting collection is impeccably tailored suit pants, jackets and shirting, which can be custom made for wearers in an array of luxurious fabrications selected from the in-store library of leather bound fabric sample books, before being made in Portugal.

Every detail of each garment is entirely customisable – from collars to lapels, buttons, pockets, cuffs and leg width.

Karl says Working Style’s philosophy of personalization endures in W.

“Everything we’re doing now is personalized, it’s very, very important. As a company we also value comfort – everything has to be comfortable, easy to wear and can be worn in different environments.”

Current offerings also reflect a more casual approach to suiting – with the garments making their way into more relaxed aesthetics.

“We’re not as formal as the garments we started our life with,” says Karl.

“It’s a contemporary take on a classic, we’re making items which gives the wearer options.”

The launch of W coincides with the recent opening of the new central city store, a fitting milestone for the business – which started its life door knocking Christchurch businesses offer shirt tailoring.

It also follows a challenging period for the world’s retailers, with Covid-19-induced global lockdowns rendering bricks and mortar retailers – and office attire – off limits for many.

 


 

Stand out from the crowd: Magazine Designer Clothing


Walking into Magazine Designer Clothing you’re greeted with an array of colours, beautiful predominantly New Zealand-made clothing, exquisite accessories and most importantly, friendly staff. The store thrives on helping their customers find the perfect style, no matter the size, age or occasion you’re shopping for. Metropol was lucky enough to catch up with owner Linda Savage about what makes her beautiful brand so special.

 

Nicola Mcmahon and Linda Savage (owner)

When they say they have something for every occasion they mean it, covering casual all the way to mother of the bride.

With new styles coming in almost daily, “there’s always something new and always something special,” Linda says.

With those special occasions finally happening again, make this your destination for all of your outfitting needs.

They also offer limited quantities, “so you’re not going to walk onto the street and run into someone wearing the same outfit,” Linda says.

Not to mention Magazine Designer Clothing exclusive designs that will really set you apart from the crowd.

But that’s not to say that everything you buy there has to be for an occasion. Maybe you just wish to treat yourself with a very special investment piece.

The store offers wardrobe builders that serve as a strong foundation for your clothing and lots of “trans-seasonal items that enable you to make the most of your wardrobe,” Linda enthuses.

Garments aren’t the only thing the store specialises in. While looking at the accessories as they catch the light, Linda says “This is a magpie’s heaven!”

We tend to think it would be an accessory lover’s heaven. After all, the perfect outfit must be complemented with some jewellery or even a bag. All can be found at Magazine Designer Clothing.

You can find this gem at the Windmill Centre in Riccarton.


 

A Crisp Collection


Caitlin Crisp first won Kiwi hearts on Project Runway NZ, now she’s transformed reality TV success into a design empire, with a fashion philosophy based on timeless, easy to wear pieces that are elegant but still a bit of fun.

 

 

What attracted you to the design field?

It’s one of those things where when you know, you know.

According to mum I was dressing myself before I could talk!

But I have also always been interested in the construction and technical side of producing clothing, so it all grew from there.


You’re originally from Christchurch before hitting it big on TVNZ 2’s Project Runway, where are you based now?

Auckland! I love both Auckland and Christchurch so will always live between the two but needed to be up here to get a head-start in the fashion industry. It was the right move.


It’s an industry that’s said to take no prisoners, how have you been able to take your reality TV success and turn this into a long term business?

It’s definitely a tough industry but I think the way I handled being on the show is true to how I handle the industry – ruthless positivity and by working with like-minded people that share the same problem-solving and forward-thinking attitude!


What’s the most fulfilling part of what you do?

Oh goodness where to start!? It’s the little things like sitting in my studio in the early hours of the morning thinking, “this is my space, this is my business, how amazing!”

And then the obvious ones such as seeing customers and loved ones wearing and feeling amazing in my designs, coming up with new ideas and working with beautiful fabrics.

Sewing and completing garments is a really fulfilling activity in itself!


What do the next 12 month have in store for you and the brand?

I try to separate the two where possible (it’s impossible!), but for starters, we have a great summer collection coming with our first exclusive print!

I’m very excited for that and often find myself wearing the samples around the studio.

I hope to pick up a few new stockists and do my best to get through what I’m sure is going to be an interesting year ahead.

Personally, the only things that are guaranteed are daily phone calls to my darling mother and many wines with girlfriends here in Auckland!

 

 


 

Small rooms with big impact: Armstrong Interiors


Think small rooms need to eschew style? Then think again! Metropol catches up with award-winning Interior Designer Angelique Armstrong from Armstrong Interiors about how to create small rooms with big impact.

 

 


How do you make small spaces feel bigger?

When decorating a small room, ‘less is more’.

If furniture and accessories block the view into a room, it will look cramped.

Moving furniture away from walkways will open up the space and make it feel larger. Use a few large, simple pieces of furniture or accessories in place of several smaller pieces, which make a space look cluttered.

With open space and large blocks of colour, the room will appear to be more calm and comfortable.

Positioning a large mirror opposite a window will bring the outside in and create depth, while hanging a mirror opposite a doorway will give the illusion of space.


What are the best ways to add colour and flair to the WC or powder room?

Adding colour and texture helps bring the space to life.

Create interest by adding wallpaper, mirrors and feature lighting.

If your bathroom boasts a mostly neutral design with a white vanity, an accent wall behind your vanity and mirror will create visual interest.

Whatever your home’s interior theme is, it is important to have the same continuous design flow with the rest of the house.


What are the golden rules with wallpaper patterns in small rooms?

Nowadays the singular feature wall is just not quite enough and it is popular to wallpaper an entire room.

I prefer two walls if need be; it’s less predictable.

Wallpaper can be very effective in a small space; adding interest by creating a beautiful focal point, creating depth in a room with short walls and making low ceilings look taller.

Wallpaper has the ability to be the hero of the room or subtlety to pull everything together. I like to incorporate colour, depth and texture.


How can you add storage to a small room?

Furniture is a clever way to create more storage.

Look out for coffee tables and consoles with drawers and cupboard space, while a customised wall unit will help clear excess clutter from your useful surfaces and tables.

In the bedroom, invest in bedside cabinets with drawers or ottomans with storage, beds with drawers underneath are handy or you can utilise storage boxes.


Phone: 03 356 2636
Email: office@armstronginteriors.co.nz
Instagram: armstronginteriorsltd


 

Exclusively exceptional: IB Fashion & Bridal


IB Fashion & Bridal extends a warm welcome to try on the exclusive wedding attire by multi award-winning designer, Ingrid Brook.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent additions to her exquisite wedding dress collection, housed in shop 54 of The Tannery’s heritage grounds, are Helen Fontaine International and Pollardi European.

For all beautiful brides to be, and mothers of brides and grooms who cannot find the perfect outfit, book an essential consultation with Ingrid for her exclusive custom-making service for bridal-wear or any special occasion.

Complete the special outfit with an exclusive range of boutique veils, hair accessories and jewellery.

For all enquiries, or to make a booking to try on any of the dresses, phone 021 330 600.

View the latest collections on the website.


 

Dame Trelise Cooper’s: True Colours


The juxtaposition of strength and softness that represents women is something Dame Trelise Cooper always seeks to capture in her designs.

 

 

It’s not unlike the juxtaposition of Trelise herself; the beautiful, elegant and bubbly woman that heads a fabulous fashion empire, with colour at its heart and style in its soul.

It’s also a juxtaposition that was intentionally weaved into her latest collection – both figuratively and literally.

“I think it’s about a new romanticism that transcends the trouble that’s happening in the world,” she says of Trelise Cooper Pre-Fall 2020.

“There’s something kind of romantic, mythical, that takes us out of our every day. The colour palette is soft and strong all at once; it pairs pinks with red; there’s a vibrant green that matches the colour of the earth.

“I think it’s about transcending and going to somewhere dreamy.”

She’s the long-reigning queen of colour and the latest season is no different; there’s pinks, greens, vibrant florals; there’s also polka dots and sequins.

“I definitely have my favourites,” she laughs.

“I really love the green of this season; there’s a green dress that I wear that has a tone on tone embellished ribbon embroidery (Runaway Rudi Dress), I love the Make My Heart Beat Coat and I like the green pinstripe suiting (Like Miss Markle Dress and the Have I Told You Shapely Dress), then I like the red hearts on the tulle (Nothing But Ruffle Skirt) as well actually…

“Towards autumn there’s more oyster and silver together, which I think is a lovely combination; it’s strong and soft at once which captures the strength of women; we can be strong and soft which is always what I try to achieve.”

Though it’s hard to imagine her in black – the day we meet she is wearing the most divine deep tropical pink that is almost impossible to describe in words – she says she has worn plenty of the dark shade throughout her life.

“I love black and have worn a lot of it in my life, I also employ a lot of women who love black and though we are mostly known for our colour, we sell black! All our garments have an option in black just for New Zealanders.”

However, she says, the power of colour is addictive. A couple of the ladies in the Trelise team that were steadfast on their black eventually dabbled in colour and they’ve never gone back.

“When you wear colour people notice and people comment! Those complements become addictive; so many women tell me that story.”

So what are Trelise’s words of wisdom when it comes to going to the colourful side? Start small!

“Stay with your black but try one piece of colour with it, whether that’s a top with pants or one of the girls here wears the bright colour printed kimonos over black.

“Black makes such a lovely canvas for colour. We do a lot of open-front garments that can be worn buttoned up down the front like a dress, or open like a lightweight coat over jeans or when you’re wearing black; that’s a really great introduction to colour.”

She gets her bold inspiration from a life well lived.

“Inspiration is a concept I find really interesting; it’s magical; it’s kind of mysterious. I’m always surprised at how inspiration I’ve come across on a trip whether to Morocco, India, Greece or Mexico, somehow makes its way into my collections through colour, texture and pattern.”

It was domestic travel that has provided that inspiration in recent times.

In Christchurch to give an exclusive preview of her pre-fall collection at Ballantynes, Trelise was impressed by the city’s re-birth.

“It is a slice of heaven! The people are always so welcoming and friendly. This last trip I was struck by how international Christchurch is. I think Ballantynes is the most beautiful department store, at an international level and I was so impressed with how the city has developed.”

She headed to ‘the strip’ for dinner. “All those restaurants along there was so interesting and Amazonita was so cool and casually stylish, I wish we had it in Auckland!
“I think Christchurch has done a really great job of rebuilding and it’s an exciting place to visit.”

Trelise has seen a lot in almost 40 years of business, but nothing has come close to the past six months.

Just before Christmas, her Australian customers were hit with droughts, then the horrific bush fires, then came floods and a retail recession.

As soon as light beckoned at the end of the tunnel, COVID-19 started unfolding.

“This is unlike anything I’ve ever experienced. The ramifications are uncertain so far, though nothing is ever certain in business really.”

Though she has had to hit the pause button on a swag of international travel, Trelise is feeling optimistic about 2020.

There’s plenty of international opportunities in the works, particularly with her eco bag that the brand has been producing since 2008 (it’s sold millions!).

“It’s a changing feast of ideas at the moment; things are changing daily with what’s happening in the world.

“I had travel planned, first to Mexico, then Korea and rural France, but at the moment that all has a big question mark on it. So I guess 2020 is all about keeping business building and keeping things going; it’s a time where making plans is interesting and we’re just keeping on keeping on.”


 

Celebrating Couture in Canterbury


Young emerging designer Natasha Senior was 14 when she won the top prize at the 2018 YMCA Walk the Line catwalk, part of New Zealand Fashion Week. Her winning entry of linen top and neoprene trousers is now being showcased alongside garments from established designers, such as Trelise Cooper and Adrienne Whitewood, at Canterbury Museum in its Moana Currents: Dressing Aotearoa Now exhibition, which opened Saturday, 22 February and runs to 14 June 2020.

 

Photography: Mara Sommer

 

Moana Currents: Dressing Aotearoa Now was developed by the New Zealand Fashion Museum.

Co-curated by Doris de Pont, New Zealand Fashion Museum Director and Fashion Journalist Dan Ahwa, the exhibition looks at how Aotearoa New Zealand’s identity is shaped by our place in the Pacific Ocean (Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa), and celebrates contemporary expression in jewellery, clothing, textile, and body adornment in New Zealand.

Both emerging and established designers are included in the exhibition to explore a range of connecting themes, such as; the adaptation and application of technology, mastery and invention in the use of heritage craft techniques, including stitching and weaving; the applications and evolution of cultural motifs, and the ongoing dialogue between wrapping and structured dressing.

Some of the garments and adornments showcased in the exhibition are streetwear from Bill Urale’s (aka King Kapisi) Overstayer label, a missionary-style dress by Trelise Cooper, a Neil Adcock hei tiki that can dance, Steve Hall’s androgynous dress, and a merino wool wrap that’s reminiscent of a muka kaitaka (flax fibre cloak), created by London-based New Zealand designer Emilia Wickstead, in collaboration with Woolmark in 2019.

Canterbury Museum is the first South Island venue to exhibit Moana Currents. Canterbury Museum Director Anthony Wright says the exhibition is a terrific showcase for the extraordinary work of Aotearoa New Zealand’s fashion designers and the pride we have in the way Pacific cultures have influenced our Kiwi sense of style.

“What we wear really does reflect who we are as individuals and as a nation. We think this exhibition will be very popular with both our local and international visitors.”

Doris de Pont says she’s thrilled to be bringing the exhibition to Canterbury.

“Moana Currents shows how our history of migration and cultural exchange is visible in what we wear and how we adorn ourselves. Aotearoa New Zealand’s identity has evolved over time as generations of people migrated here. Who we are and how we dress is a reflection of those journeys, both past and present, and an expression of our aspirations and how we want to be seen.”

This three-part project includes the exhibition at Canterbury Museum, as well as an accompanying book and online exhibition found online.


 

Wardrobe Wow!


They work closely with New Zealand and overseas designers to source exquisite fabrics and prints with which to create unique clothing that is exclusive to them. Many of their labels are New Zealand made and of the finest quality.

 

 

Magazine Designer Clothing is passionate about making New Zealand women look beautiful, with the point of difference being that the team goes that extra distance for its clientele.

They recognise that every woman is an individual and that her requirements are specific to her.

At their Riccarton store, Nicola and her lovely team ensure that they not only select the right garment, but that they offer genuine, sensitive advice and will happily give guidance on head to toe styling, as well as on those very important accessories to complement the outfit.

For whatever special occasion you have coming up, be it a glitzy cocktail evening, a dress-up work-do, a party or wedding, there’s something here for every lady to make her feel beautiful and confident.

With sizing from 10 through to 26, every shape is covered.

The casual and lifestyle clothing found instore is fabulous too.

For the hectic and demanding lifestyle of today’s woman, who wants to look just as sensational on a weekend as she does during the week, these styles are for her.

The epitome of cool and chic, this is the kind of casualwear that takes her from watching the kids swimming to having coffee with the girls, taking a stroll in the park and relaxing with a wine at the neighbour’s barbecue.

The one thing every woman should treat herself to this summer is a visit to Magazine Designer Clothing because, quite simply, their garments are gorgeous.

If clothes of New Zealand origin, of fine quality, unique fabric, exquisite cut and design are your imperatives, then make space in your wardrobe – it’s about to be dressed as it never has before.

Find Magazine Designer Clothing at 188 Clarence Street, Riccarton. Open Monday to Friday 9:30am to 5:30pm and Saturday 10am to 4pm. Phone 021 686 929 or visit the online store.


 

The crafter of kitchens


Julia Child believed that there is nothing nicer than a kitchen made for a cook and that things that are designed to be used always have an innate beauty. Passionate kitchen designer Sandy Eagle of Sandy Eagle Design could not agree more.

 

 

Sandy’s approach is to get alongside her clients, work with them and create their unique, fun, functional space that suits their lifestyle.

Sandy’s initial consultation is for two hours, getting to know her clients, how they use their kitchen, what is important, how they entertain and play in their kitchen.

Getting the function right is extremely important.

Then Sandy creates a look that reflects her clients’ personalities and surroundings, country, modern, eclectic, industrial, a coloured kitchen or natural tones.

She is passionate about them all.

Having more than 20 years in the building industry, Sandy uses the knowledge she has gained to stand back and really look at the space for her clients.

She creates options that can transfigure any space. Sandy’s passion is designing the heart of every home – the kitchen.

Sandy not only completes the design; she oversees the whole process: design, supply and installation.

Using her trusted suppliers, the whole job is completed ready for her clients to enjoy.

Working in Canterbury, the West Coast, Marlborough, and Queenstown, most of her clients are referrals or repeat clients renovating or building their next home – and to Sandy that is the greatest compliment.

Looking at renovating or building? Sandy would love to work alongside you to create your unique kitchen that reflects your personality.