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Must-see exhibition


Giant birds and ancient crocodiles are taking over Canterbury Museum these holidays in an exhibition that has to be seen to be believed.

 

Canterbury Museum curators Dr Paul Scofield and Dr Vanesa De Pietri with a life-size model of Mannering’s Penguin, a 1.2 metre penguin that lived around 62 million years ago.

 

Ancient New Zealand: Squawkzilla and the Giants is the result of more than 20 years of collaborative research by scientists working in Central Otago and North Canterbury, to uncover the animals that once roamed our land.

One of the most exciting discoveries was a metre-tall parrot Heracles Inexpectatus – nicknamed Squawkzilla by scientists – which lived in New Zealand about 20 million years ago.

The bones of Squawkzilla, and a life-size model, have been put together for the exhibition, so visitors can now come face-to-face with our past in never-before-seen detail.

Also on display are giant penguins that inhabited the oceans near what is now Waipara more than 60 million years ago. At a Central Otago site with fossils from around 20 million years ago, they uncovered many different types of birds that have never been seen in New Zealand before; bats that walked along the forest floor as well as crocodiles and turtles.

The exhibition runs from 13 December 2019 to 12 July 2020.

“It will be a summer blockbuster,” Museum Director Anthony Wright says.

“We think visitors will be blown away when they see the life-size models of the penguins, the parrot and the crocodile. While the exhibition will be entertaining, it’s grounded in science and we hope people will come away having learnt a little more about the ancient past of Aotearoa New Zealand.


 

The Influencers: Lianne Dalziel


I love the fact it’s 2020! When applied to eyesight, 20/20 refers to clarity of vision and that is what I am sure the year 2020 will deliver to our city and region. I am hugely optimistic for what this year holds.

 

Christchurch Mayor

 

Not only will we continue to see the benefits of private and public investment in our city, we will see major projects fully completed and others underway.

Christchurch’s Convention Centre, Te Pae, will open in 2020 and what a difference that will make for the region as a whole.

When I think of the conferences we will be hosting, I don’t just think about the delegates attending, I think of the extra days that they pack in on either side of the conference, the family they might bring along for the ride, or bring back after the conference when they’ve had a taste of what the region has to offer.

And what about the American Airlines announcement that will connect North America and our region with Los Angeles to Christchurch direct flights three days a week?

I am so grateful we have such an active airport company that continues to invest in building international connectivity.

We will see the Metro Sports Facility starting to rise from the ground this year, and this will bring huge benefits, especially to the accommodation sector, due to the national events that will be held there.

The signs of visible progress we will see this year will really help to restore confidence in what is the heart and soul of our city.


 

Summer of discovery in Otautahi Christchurch


Our urban city centre is becoming a vibrant, interesting place. As you prepare for the summer break, architect Craig South, of Allfrey + South, recommends including Christchurch in your plans.

If you haven’t visited the central city for a while, I’d suggest making some time over summer to go and explore it. You’ll find a lot has changed for the better, with so many new buildings and developments up and running.

A good starting point is Tūranga, the city’s new main public library. Tūranga is the largest public library in the South Island, so there is plenty to see and do just in this building alone.

Our practice recently hosted one of our social forums on architecture (ArchiChat) there at Auaha Hīhī (Spark Place), a ground-floor meeting space.

This world-class facility is truly multi-purpose, serving not just as an information hub, but also as a fit-for-purpose centre of engagement and interaction.

Christchurch’s new waterfront is flourishing. The City Promenade – part of Te Papa Ōtakaro/Avon River Precinct – opened just over a year ago, running along Oxford Terrace.

If you do nothing else this summer, do take a stroll along this well-paved riverside walk that passes by the Canterbury Earthquake Memorial, the Bridge of Remembrance, Te Pae Christchurch Convention Centre (scheduled to open in October 2020) and Victoria Square to the Margaret Mahy Family Playground.

Along the way, you can stop and visit Christchurch’s hospitality hotspots at The Terrace or the bustling new Riverside Market development that boasts an indoor farmers market, linked with boutique shops, restaurants, cafés and bars.

The market’s lively mix of local growers and small traders makes this place a real stand-out. It’s on an intimate scale that people just love and it certainly makes a change from the suburban malls.

It’s exciting to see Christchurch evolving into an innovative, liveable city that includes these sorts of hubs or small communities of businesses offering something different to the big chain retail approach.

The Welder complex on Welles Street, with a health and wellbeing focus, is another great example of this.

You’ll also find a dash of character in the SALT district, home to some cool heritage buildings and alternative eateries such as Little High Eatery. The inner city is now generally well set-up for shopping, enlivened by Melbourne-style laneways.

Of course, the Arts Centre, Christchurch Art Gallery and Canterbury Museum are other familiar drawcards, along with the Christchurch Botanic Gardens.

Not everything has happened as quickly as hoped in the city. Yet at least the end is in sight for some big projects, such as Te Pae and the new Metro Sports Facility (due to be finished in late 2021). Stabilisation work is soon to begin on Christ Church Cathedral and the council plans to put an investment case to Cabinet for Christchurch’s new stadium by Christmas.

There is much else to be excited about, such as the planned new Court Theatre in the city’s performing arts precinct. While we wait, there’s a nearby colony of black-billed gulls, tarāpuka, in the flooded foundations of the former PWC building site providing quite a show.

If you’re here over summer with family, I recommend adding it to your itinerary of things to see and do in Christchurch! www.allso.co.nz


 

Archibalds Motors

A high-performance rebuild: Archibalds Motors


One of the most highly respected vehicle brands globally, Porsche has long represented luxury in its high-performance sports cars.

 

Archibalds Motors

 

So not surprising then that Archibalds Motors would seek to capture these same elements in its new Porsche showroom in the city, the delivery of which was tasked to award-winning Map Architects and construction company Hanham & Philp.They have definitely delivered on that. The luxury vehicles that come under the Porsche marquee are certainly at home in their new flagship dealership on the corner of Tuam and Antigua Streets, where the floor space covers some 1500 square metres and is framed by steel and floor to ceiling glass.

Plans for the new development – which opened in November – have been on the drawing board for 10 years, with the post-quake need to rebuild its site and the area around it being rezoned as the Health Precinct ramping up a long-held vision for an innovative mixed-use building. Today the exceptional two-level high curved façade stands just 200 metres from where Alex Archibald founded his family’s Christchurch motor company a century ago.

 

Topped with three floors of medical tenancies, including the Christchurch Clinical Studies Trust on the top floor, the building covers a total of some 6700 square metres.  Much like the top of the range vehicles are right at home in the new surroundings, the exceptional space of the new Archibalds Porsche showroom is right at home in the rebuilding city. After all, what better fit than a world-leading marquee in a world-leading CBD?

 



 

What’s in that building?

What’s in that building?


The CBD is buzzing. Even two years ago that could not be said with confidence and the fear was it may never be said again. But those fears are officially unfounded.

 

What’s in that building?

 

Sure, there are some large holes to still be filled, and a few spaces and broken facades to be decided on and reinvigorated. And, while some of the city’s most iconic buildings sit in ruin with many gone forever, all but the most pessimistic can take heart that some have been and are being restored, with some beautiful new buildings being erected to replace them.

In October, Turanga officially opened; five floors of knowledge, cutting edge digital technology, modern design features and displays of art and culture. The bus interchange on Colombo Street has already become an important feature of the new cityscape. Stylish and user friendly, as the city has come alive around it, it has become the central hub it was intended to be.

As more retail outlets, cafes, restaurants, and nightlife venues open, and with some very high profile projects scheduled to open in the next few years, the already buzzing city is set to erupt! With so many changes, however, navigating the city can be tricky. If you venture into The Crossing – a “diverse yet intimate, one hectare precinct of heritage facades… enticing laneways and open public spaces” and, of course, shops, shops and more shops – be sure to take some breadcrumbs because getting lost is a real possibility. It is however, a pretty nice place to be lost in for a couple of hours.

 

Christchurch

Plymouth Lane is a retail space, conveniently located under a multi-storey parking building with a huge cycle lock-up area and individual lockers. At the river end of Cashel Street there are cafés and eateries, including a Black & White Coffee Cartel, a Metromart and The General Store, popular with tourists and locals, for gifts and homewares.

If you have driven or walked along any of the main city routes and wondered what is in that shiny new building, you are not alone. Naming rights offers some indication, but more often than not, there are gems inside that may not be so obvious.
For example, Grant Thornton House on Oxford Terrace is not only the striking new home of the global accounting giant, it also houses Amaterrace Teppanyaki Japanese Steak House and, on the street level, the newly opened (early Jan) Chiwahwah Mexican Cantina and Bar.

Across the river is 93 Cambridge Terrace, a four-storey black-glass, nondescript building called Iwikau. Inside are Aurecon and EY. On the ground floor, West End Pharmacy, West End Expressmart, and West End Stories Café. But Iwikau’s surprise lies on the opposite side of the building, invisible from the busy thoroughfare. It is Ngā Mara a Te Wera, The Gardens of Te Wera.

Te Wera was a Ngāi Tahu warrior chief and had a long association with the area that came also to be occupied by the King Edward Barracks. It is a beautiful, quiet, shared seating space that respects its deep Maori and European histories. You can read more about it on the storyboard in the garden.

 



 

Architectural Alchemy

Architectural Alchemy


Little by little and project by project, Christchurch’s ever-evolving urban landscape is taking form. No longer the quaint post-Victoria spot it once was, it is rising from the rubble with a dynamic new edge.

 

Architectural Alchemy

 

The emerging Christchurch will be an overlay of the new upon the old – one that preserves heritage while embracing modernity. The result will be a 21st-century ‘Garden City’ that provides a new way of working and living in a city within a contemporary and vibrant environment. It is perhaps best exemplified by the raft of awards earned on the local level at the recent ADNZ | Resene Architectural Design Awards, one of the most coveted architecture awards in the country. Cymon Allfrey of Cymon Allfrey Architects has taken out yet another prestigious architecture award for ‘The Family Bach’ when it was named the supreme winner.

The ADNZ award win means The Family Bach has received recognition at five separate architecture awards programmes in 2018 – making it one of the most recognised designs in the country ever. Set in the idyllic Hanmer Springs, it was created as a retreat for Cymon’s own family to enjoy and ADNZ judges described the playful collection of three hovering buildings as a place for making lasting memories. The Family Bach was not the only winner on the night from the Canterbury region. Out of nine projects recognised with ADNZ | Resene Architectural Design Awards in New Zealand – four were from Canterbury.

The other winners were ‘Latimer’ by Kelly Rush of Krush Architecture, ‘Redcliff Village Library’ by Greg Young of Young Architects and ‘Glandovey Home’ by Cymon Allfrey of Cymon Allfrey Architects Ltd. Redcliffs Village Library – designed by Greg Young of Young Architects won the Commercial/Industrial Architectural Design Award. The brief was to deliver a small, fit for purpose, community hub facility that supports both the voluntary library function and a multipurpose community space. Cymon Allfrey had another winning home, this time in the Residential New Home over 300m2 Architectural Design Award. A residential home on Glandovey Road with a soaring pitched roof that runs the length of the house, Glandovey Home was praised by judges for being an “individualist” but at the same time sitting nicely with its surrounds.

Kelly Rush of Krush Architecture received the Residential Multi-Unit Dwelling Architectural Design Award for a modern design of three large, high-spec townhouses located in Christchurch’s central city. Judges were complimentary of Rush for creating a sense of privacy in a busy urban setting. Architectural Designers New Zealand CEO, Astrid Andersen, says the four Canterbury projects were worthy winners in a hotly contested awards season. “With home owners taking greater creative risks and putting more trust in their designers and architects – the resulting architecture is more exciting, interesting and bold,” she says.

“Cymon Allfrey’s bach design is an example of this. Cymon was free to design a home that was brave, adventurous and a work of art. We only hope that this trend continues and more of our members are given the opportunity to push the boat out and let their creativity take sail.”

 



 

FESTA

Celebrating Urban Creativity: FESTA

Bringing life to the central city has been the remit of city planners, policy makers and even the public post-quake, as we seek to reinvigorate and reimagine this space.

FESTA
FESTA 2016’s headline event, Leans Means. Image by Peanut Productions Photography.

It’s a brief that has been met by FESTA, the vibrant biennial festival of urban creativity and community, which is set to once again bring thousands back into the city’s heart this Labour Weekend (19-22 October).
This year’s festival explores the interconnections between food and the city. Food has historically been the foundation of our urban spaces and has played a crucial role in bringing life to this central space, with new and relocated restaurants, community gardens and food trucks keeping the city’s fires burning.

On Saturday 20 October the headline event, FEASTA! – a free and spectacular celebration of food and city-making – will be live for just one night in and around the city’s new public spaces. Christchurch’s biggest and brightest street party, it will feature large-scale installations, performances, artworks, activities and lots of wonderful things to eat and drink.
The Associate Programme, which runs over the course of Labour Weekend, builds on the theme of feasting and explores food’s role in the urban fabric through workshops, performance, art, talks, tours, family events and more. Some of the highlights include Freerange Press’s symposium hosted by Simon Wilson, an outdoor film screening put on by The Community Gardens and Food Resilience network, a food foraging tour and a Friday night disco of funk and food.

Save the date and keep your eyes peeled for the full programme by visiting.

www.festa.org.nz.

CBD A CULINARY HOTSPOT

CBD a Culinary Hotspot: The CBD is emerging as a space that packs a culinary punch

Amid the concrete and glass of Christchurch’s sparkling new city, the CBD is emerging as a space that packs a culinary punch. Because, although deciding where to have dinner can be a tough decision, the central city has become a hotspot for the hungry with all types of foods and cuisines including Thai, Mexican, Indian, Italian, Japanese and everything in between.

CBD A CULINARY HOTSPOT
The central city has become a hotspot for the hungry

The city doesn’t just have a plethora of cuisines to offer hungry people, it also has unique options that give customers a different dining experience. For instance, The Little High Eatery, located on Saint Asaph Street, is a classy food court that houses eight local and family-run businesses. Basically, it’s a one-stop shop for filling your mouth with tasty food – Thai, sushi, pizza, burgers and more!
Just around the corner on High Street, The Monday Room is another eatery that has made a splash in the central city dining space. You’ll feast your eyes on a range of elegantly prepared, meat and seafood-focused dishes such as braised lamb shoulder served with a mouth-pleasing mixture of orange, watercress, mint and pomegranate.

Culinary Hotspot
The establishment encourages its patrons to have a social dining experience while they savor shareable-sized meals. Its distinguished ‘Trust the Chef’ menu, where the chef crafts special dishes for each customer, sets it apart from other establishments in the area.
Meanwhile, a couple of blocks down, Welles Street too is making its culinary mark after local firm Box 112 repurposed six former industrial buildings, including a former blacksmith’s workshop, transforming them into a complex of artisan businesses known as The Welder after a former tenant.

Culinary Hotspot
Interesting, quirky and raw, the spaces in The Welder are engaging and authentic, headed by operators who have a shared vision for raising the standard of healthy, locally produced food in the city.
New Regent Street too is a culinary destination worthy of its prestige, with cafés, bars and restaurants making their commercial homes here, including 27 Steps, Moko Café, Caffeine Lab, Sushi Sachi, Shop Eight Food and Wine, Coffee Lovers and The Last Word.
Keep in mind that these are just some of the examples of the many eateries around the central city. Christchurch’s inner circle has a lot to offer, you just have to be willing to experience it. So the next time your stomach starts rumbling, step out of your comfort zone and into the CBD to try something new.

Public Parks

Growth of green spaces: nature is taking over cities around the world

The human populace has been known to push the boundaries to the extreme when it comes to the creation of urban greenspaces, with public parks springing up in the most unusual of places; on the tops of tall buildings, in the middle of stormwater management areas and now, in abandoned underground spaces

Public Parks

Yes, abandoned rail corridors throughout the world are now being repurposed into linear parks and unused rail lines are being transformed into hiking and biking trails.
The conversion of an abandoned underground trolley terminal scheduled to open in 2021, New York’s Lowline has been billed as ‘the world’s first subterranean green space’ after laying unused for more than 60 years.
Plans consist of a 9m wide aluminium solar canopy distributing natural sunlight onto a live cultivated landscape ‘park’.
Further west, advocates fighting to keep the now-closed Battery Street tunnel in Seattle from being filled with rubble from the demolished Viaduct hope to transform the underground space into a unique public park. Food for local thought?