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React, Rebuild, Reminisce


Almost a decade has passed since the traumatic events of the 2011 earthquakes. That’s nearly 10 years of trying to get the city back on its feet. Bit by bit, building by building we’re started to rebuild the heart of the Garden City.

 

 

We’ve hunted out all the upcoming developments and cool things happening around town to get you excited about the year to come – we weren’t short of inspiration!


Christchurch Hospital Acute Services Building:

If you haven’t been into the CBD and seen this colossal 10-storey building creeping up in size near the Christchurch Women’s Hospital, then you may need to look again.

This gigantic project has been in construction since 2015 and, as the largest government project in Canterbury coming in at 62,000 square metres, it’s easy to see why this is such a big deal for the city – literally and figuratively! It’s set to throw open its doors later this year.


Te Pae Christchurch Convention Centre:

The Convention Centre, scheduled to open in October this year, will provide the facilities we’ve been lacking since its predecessor was demolished in early 2012.

Supported by accommodation, retail, hospitality and public transport, it is set to be world-class and it’s certainly got the look down pat; the braided river façade of the new building is already the talk of the town.

With 43,000 herringbone tiles set to be installed on the building… no wonder it’s popping into conversation here and there.


The South Frame:

This project is in construction stage, with around three quarters of it already now complete.

Ōtākaro Ltd describes the site as “a place for markets, events and celebrations – an area to gather, dine, be entertained or just relax”.

The Greenway will be at the heart of this project, providing an oasis in between the hustle and bustle of city life.


3D interactive visualiser:

With all these new developments, you might be keen to look back on just how much this city has evolved in the few years following the earthquake.

The Christchurch City Council can help you do that with their ‘3D interactive visualiser of the CBD’.

Not only can you view the buildings we lost during the quake, but you can also see the revival and emergence of the new CBD.

It really puts into perspective just how far we’ve come in such a short time.


Canterbury Multi-Use Arena:

Labelled a ‘game-changer’ for the city, the multi-use arena will help Christchurch re-establish itself as New Zealand’s sporting and cultural capital.

The 25,000-seat arena is set to come in at $472 million to build.

A small(ish) price to pay to transform Christchurch into a super-host for major sporting and cultural events.


 

Time to regenerate


The Avon River (Ōtākaro) is a Christchurch local that can be described as the heart of the city. Flowing through the centre of the city, it’s a popular recreational waterway for locals and tourists alike.

Now it’s set to get better than ever before, with three footbridges, a riverside landing and a restored band rotunda set to appear alongside the Avon, with the Christchurch Earthquake Appeal Trust approving more than $14.7 million in funding for Council-led regeneration projects.

The Appeal Trust’s $18 million package of grants to the council and community groups includes a $13,765,500 grant to kick-start infrastructure projects along the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor.

The projects in the former residential red zone include three pedestrian/cycle bridges at Medway Street, Snell Place and Aranui and a riverside landing near Dallington, as originally outlined in Regenerate Christchurch’s Regeneration Plan for the area.

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel says the Appeal Trust funding for the Regeneration Area will greatly improve the connectivity of communities and begin transforming the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor into a valuable asset for the community.

“The three pedestrian and cycle bridges mean communities along the river will be more connected to each other, and users will be able to create their own walking and cycling loops as they explore the area,” the Mayor says.

“Installing a landing at Dallington will also enable people to connect and interact with the Ōtākaro Avon River on a much more personal level.”

As outlined in the Regeneration Plan that the Council approved, the footbridges and Dallington landing will form part of a 350-hectare “Green Spine” running the length of the Ōtākaro Avon River from the city to the sea.

It will eventually consist of seven riverside landings, formed and unformed walking and cycle trails, and regenerating native forest.

“With the Global Settlement between the Council and Crown finalised, this grant, together with funding outlined in the Long Term Plan, means we can start the regeneration of the Green Spine in earnest,” the Mayor says.

The Council also received a $1 million Appeal Trust grant for the restoration of the Thomas Edmonds Band Rotunda, along with funding towards many other well-deserving local projects.

Here’s to hoping that the ‘red zone’ turns into a ‘green zone’.


 

New cathedral for city centre


Following an earlier decision not to rebuild the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament on Barbadoes Street, a new Catholic cathedral will be built in the centre of the city, adjacent to Victoria Square.

 

 

As well as the new cathedral, a pastoral centre/community hub, the new St Mary’s Primary School, offices for the Catholic Diocese and residential accommodation for clergy, plus a multi-storey carpark building, will also be built on the site bordered by Armagh Street, Colombo Street, Cambridge Terrace and Manchester Street.

The Catholic Bishop of Christchurch, Paul Martin, says the adjoining community hub will involve the wider public in a variety of activities and provide much-needed social services.

“It is my desire for the cathedral to be in the heart of the city, where our Catholic community can visit on a daily basis to pray and reflect, and for the church to be able to play a part in re-energising the life of the city.”

The cathedral is expected to be able to accommodate up to 1000 people and could be completed by 2025.

It is expected to cost $85 million for the Cathedral, $11 million for the primary school and $30 million for the diocesan share of the joint venture with the Carter Group for the pastoral centre, offices and clergy accommodation, plus the 600-vehicle carpark building.

There is $45 million set aside from the earthquake insurance claim with the remaining funding to be met by both fundraising and the sale of excess property and assets.