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The Influencers: Paul Lonsdale


Central City Business Association Central City Manager

Going back into Alert Level 2 certainly re-tested the resilience of our business community. Survival seems to be the theme as 2020 continues to test us all in one way or another.

That said, watching any of the David Attenborough Planet Earth series, I am always in awe of what the animal kingdom has to do on a daily basis just to survive. It’s survival of the fittest, smartest, strongest, the most determined every second of their lives.

In my view, determination and having a goal are key aspects of business survival and often these attributes drive certain people to overcome adversity.

I recently spoke to one businessperson who said “failure is not an option” as he has a young family and cannot afford to fail.

He has had to rethink all he does within his business and look for additional opportunities to help overcome Covid-19 related adversity.

However, you should never be afraid of failure, as often this can be a precursor to success.

Successful people often have a multitude of failures before finding the right mix to success.

Having determination and an end goal drives them to pick themselves up and start again.

With the work I do, I get to see firsthand how difficult it is for people out there at the moment.

I have said this before but I will say it again, support your local, and be kind to each other, as you never know what someone is dealing with.


 

The latest reborn beauty: Stockman Group


An alluring staircase entrance with warm heritage colours and brass treads leads past a dazzling chandelier to the bespoke new office spaces of Ruby Black.

 

 

The latest reborn beauty from Stockman Group at 201 High Street melds cherished history with perfect contemporary function.

This rebuild was a passion of two halves.

The original Ruby building has become contemporary-themed office spaces on two levels, with the ground floor poised for retail or hospitality.

Adjoined, is the reconstructed former Victoria Black building which parades the original façade of two beautiful arched windows, above Kilt fashion store.

For Director Shaun Stockman, reinstating the iconic window features was a rewarding labour of love, and cash injection.

Now fully double-glazed and extensively repaired, the landmark lights up the Salt District by night.

The project started February last year, with Shaun adding the final touches during lockdown.

Now of the nine affordable office spaces from 26 to 60sqm, five remain for tenure.

All include practical desk configurations, separate meeting spaces, and full kitchens, including wine racks and dishwashers.

Some of the black and white chic offices have expansive windows and high-raked plywood ceilings, two with spacious balconies above High Street.

A southside office has wide vistas to the hills. Some may prefer a coveted arch-window view, with a juxtaposition of modern and yesteryear detailing, such as stamped-tin ceilings.

Every office has its own personality.

And no corners have been cut here, in fact every corner exudes character. Gold cornices, chandeliers, tropical Victoriana wallpaper and glossy black paint work embellish the vestibules.

Even the shower room has Spanish tiling.

The Victoria Room is a boardroom of grandeur, complete with audio-visual screen. It feels comfortably warm here, even though high ceilings and doorways abound.

“People are not quite sure if it’s an old building or new,” he says. But this was Shaun’s intention.

“It’s a fantastic location, especially for young staff, amongst bars and cafés. We also offer parking nearby for $30pw.”

If staff numbers fluctuate, he can always negotiate a larger or smaller-sized office from his unique Above Your Space CBD portfolio.

Ruby Black is a rare, enviable work-home that will be very hard to leave.

Visit the website below or phone Anna Morawiec on 022 059 7620.


 

Central city streets get $13.3m upgrade


Drawing the masses into the central city has long been the mandate of the agencies tasked with the city’s rejuvenation, with creating a vibrant, thriving central city at the very heart of this directive.

 

PHOTO: CCC NEWSLINE

 

As such, we’ve seen ongoing investment into both the form and function of this central space.

Next on the infrastructural list is Victoria Street and Hereford Street, between Oxford Terrace and Manchester Street, which are set to receive a $13.3 million upgrade.

Approved by Christchurch City Council last year following consultation with local property owners, businesses and the wider community, the upgrade will address the damage caused by the earthquakes and the subsequent demolition work.

“Hereford Street is in a substandard condition and needs to be reconstructed to bring it up to a standard that supports the vitality of the central city,” Council Transport Planning and Delivery Manager Lynette Ellis says.

“Most businesses have indicated they would like the work done as soon as possible so we’ve decided to start the project earlier than originally planned.”

Hereford Street’s badly damaged footpaths will be replaced with new paved footpaths, with extra space provided for street furniture and planters for trees. Spaces will also be provided at nights for ride share services and taxis servicing the bars and restaurants along Oxford Terrace and Hereford Street.

The Council is also taking the opportunity to renew the water main along Hereford Street, which is coming towards the end of its life, and to repair the storm water culvert under the northern footpath.

Contractor Fulton Hogan has already begun some preliminary work along Hereford Street and expects to get fully under way on the project in the next week or two.

Lynette says they will be working in multiple locations along Hereford Street at the same time in order to progress the project as quickly as possible.

“It is estimated the upgrade of Hereford Street will be completed by early 2021 but we are exploring options to fast-track the completion.”

Victoria Street Upgrade

Fulton Hogan is also reconstructing Victoria Street; replacing dilapidated storm water drains, kerb and channel, footpaths, road surface and street lighting, and improving the street’s appearance through the addition of more trees and landscaping.

Widened footpaths, coloured surfacing, cycle lane markings, raised platforms and traffic calming measures are also going to be added to Victoria Street to create better definition for road users and a safer environment for pedestrians and cyclists.

“We did consider doing the work on Victoria Street in stages but the feedback we’ve had from the local property owners and businesses is that they would prefer the work to be all tackled at once,” Lynette says.

“As a consequence, work is now happening all the way along Victoria Street – on both sides of the road. It is disruptive but we are trying to get the project done as quickly as possible.”

Traffic on Victoria Street is restricted to one-way only between Bealey Avenue and Kilmore Street.

On street parking is currently available between Dorset Street and Corcovado, while two hours free parking is available on Peterborough Street, opposite Christchurch Casino.


 

What's in the building?

What’s in the building?


Peter Walker checks out the architectural renaissance taking place in the central city and what we can expect to find in these pockets of awesome.

 

What's in the building?

 

You can’t possibly miss Deloitte House in your meanderings along the Avon River. With office space filling up down town and the commercial lifeblood of the city flowing again, this spectacular architectural icon was one of the first developments to be completed and has, since 2015, overlooked the completion of many others.

It is an impressive structure, home to the Christchurch offices of the accounting and professional services network, as well as firms such as Simpson Grierson, Forsyth Barr, QBE Insurance, the Decipher Group and Tailorspace, and the Ben Gough Family Office, among others.

On the ground floor is embattled, and now closed, eatery Bamboozle – watch this space – whose lesser infamous neighbour is Johnny Sausage, a neat little coffee and bagel joint slash pizzeria, inspired by New York mobster John ‘Johnny Sausage’ Barbato.

Just along the lane is the Whet Drinking Room. Open 4 ‘til late Tuesday through Saturday, it is “an exquisite curation of gin, whisky and craft beer”, and boasts a pretty good looking menu, too.
On the opposite side of the Avon, The Terrace continues to expand with food, drink and nightlife venues tucked into dark, intimate corners.

Paddy’s and The Little Fiddle have takeaway or eat-in carvery foods and an entertaining Irish pub scene. Across Oxford Lane is the Bangalore Polo Club, “home of the infamous Bangalore Badgers and the most unique hospitality experience this side of the equator” according to its Facebook page.

 

What's in the building?

 

On the corner of Cashel and Oxford, under the Westpac logo, is Hawker & Roll, Malaysian inspired street food with “vibrant and authentic flavours”. Next door to that is Amazonita, a “refreshing gastronomic paradise” with a dash of Mediterranean influence.

This is the tip of the city’s burgeoning culinary iceberg. New Regent Street continues to offer more and more eating and drinking options, and the Street Food Market in Cathedral Square every Friday is very popular. With food stalls such as Nanny’s Food Truck, Kung-Fu Dumpling, and the Vagabond Chefs, one can only hope the food is as good as the names (hint: it is!).

North of the CBD, at 76 Victoria Street, is the home of Craigs Investment Partners. It is also the offices of lawyers Rhodes & Co., Rockwell Automation, EQI Global, Olympic Software and Aspiring Asset Management.

On the ground floor, looking out onto the busy intersection, is Khao San Road and Spice Paragon, Thai style cocktails and cuisine. On the corners of the building are Apollo Power Yoga (Salisbury Street) and, on the other side, arguably the most unique function venue, Beam Gallery. As the name hints, it’s a massive collection of Jim Beam decanters, memorabilia and collectibles. It’s by appointment only, so have a look at www.beamgallery.nz.

Tucked in behind the Craigs building is Casamassima Italian Fare, “real Italian” foods, coffee, wine and products. Craft beers, too! The future of food in the CBD is looking pretty good. When are you heading down town to eat next?

 


 

The Crossing

Crossing Over in the city: Exciting new spaces continue to open up in the heart of the city

From a conservative post-Victorian city to a bold and innovative urban hot spot, Christchurch has emerged as a province that packs a proverbial punch.

The Crossing
Alfred Wong (L), The Crossing developer Philip Carter and Jimmy Hsu at The Crossing in the central city

The exciting new spaces that continue to open up in the heart of the city are driving this exciting change and commanding attention, not just on a national level but also an international one as the central city plays prestigious host to increasing tourism numbers.
Yes, it’s true; Christchurch has a long way to go, but the metamorphosis at street level is palpable as we witness the rebirth of a cosmopolitan city characterised by buildings and businesses with personality.
We’re certainly not short of inspiration when it comes to finding something to do within the Four Avenues and even more so closer to the city’s heart. The internal courtyards and winding alleys that are emerging within the greater developments, such as the BNZ Centre, are packed with incredible offerings, both large and small, the operators of which are putting heart and soul into reinvesting in our city.

The Crossing developer Philip Carter has played an integral role in this evolution, now his development The Crossing is one of the strongest drawcards within the central space, with more than 60 retail tenancies, combined with hospitality, office space and a 630-space onsite car park.
One of Christchurch’s largest private developments, the $140 million project covers 44,000sqm across different levels within a hectare block between Cashel Mall, and Colombo, Lichfield and High streets. And it continues to grow.
Now two of Christchurch’s most popular modern Asian restaurants are joining the development and returning to the central city seven years after the Canterbury earthquakes, marking almost 25 years of friendship for two local men.

The Crossing is the new home to Alfred Wong’s refurbished Cookai (situated pre-earthquake in Cashel Street, with former sister restaurant Blue Fish in nearby Cathedral Junction), returning to town after operating from premises in Riccarton. Adjoining 80-seat Cookai and its renowned sushi train is Joyful Express, both designed by Alfred’s best friend Jimmy Hsu.
It marks the beginning of the next exciting era for Alfred and Jimmy, who have been friends since the serial entrepreneurs met in the early 1990s as Papanui High School students.
During Canterbury’s rebuild period, the pair made sure they got away each year travelling and gathering ideas for the eventual move back into the city. Jimmy also worked with other restaurant entrepreneurs, designing their refits in Christchurch, Queenstown and South Canterbury, including The Camden Restaurant and Bar in Riccarton Road’s Clyde Building.

When choosing the central location for their new businesses, Alfred says he wanted to get away from what he saw as “vanilla mall culture” parts of Christchurch which had developed during the rebuild, instead yearning for a dynamic space back in the city that matched the vibrancy of the food.
“We’d been offered a number of potential locations, but it wasn’t until we saw the vivacity of The Crossing that we felt that the timing was right for Cookai to return to the city, joined by an adjacent and energised Joyful Express,” he says.
Cookai opens this week followed by the smaller neighbouring Joyful Express, opening in August 2018.