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Canterbury designers take a bow


Six out of the 10 award-winning projects at the 2019 ADNZ Resene Architectural Design Awards, one of New Zealand’s most prestigious architecture awards, are by Christchurch designers. 145 entries were received from some of the most talented designers across the country. The awards were held on Friday 18 October in Queenstown.

 

A. HEREFORD APARTMENTS

 

The Christchurch winners were Greg Young of Young Architects, Nic Curragh of Objects Ltd, Ben Brady of Linetype Architectural, Robert Weir of Weir Architecture and Chris Wheeler of Hierarchy Architecture.

Greg Young from Young Architects won two awards for two different projects; the 2019 Residential New Home over 300m2 Architectural Design Award for a Merivale project titled ‘Gable Silhouette’, and the Residential Multi-Unit Dwelling Architectural Design Award for ‘Hereford Apartments’.

 

B. GABLE SILHOUETTE

 

A simple family home, ‘Gable Silhouette’ is all about the enjoyment of living. The aesthetic has been inspired by the early work of Sir Miles Warren and the architecture of Central Otago. The other award-winning project, created by Young, was the design of four one-bedroom apartments on a 405sqm site in the inner city, with judges describing the four tiny single-bedroom units as being of rare spatial quality.

Nic Curragh of Objects Ltd won the Residential New Home between 150m2 and 300m2 Architectural Design Award for his project ‘Red Rock Lane’. Nestled into a terraced hillside site in Redcliffs, this two-bedroom house has been positioned to enjoy the view east to the Southern Alps. All living spaces are accommodated on the first floor within two dark-stained cedar box forms. The more dominant north box, with its extensively glazed lounge, cantilevers out dramatically over a 13m lap pool and pool room.

 

C. ESPLANADE ALTERATIONS

Ben Brady of Linetype Architectural won the Residential Alterations and Additions Architectural Design Award for his Sumner project titled ‘Esplanade Alterations’. A light hand was required on this 100-year-old arts and crafts villa. Although already renovated and earthquake repaired, the home required an alteration with more foresight and a big picture perspective to make it suitable for modern life while retaining and enhancing its character features.

Judge’s said Brady had given the grand old house a new lease on life through an alteration that brings out its best.

“Restrained interior choices give it lightness and foregrounds the original features of the house. The entrance deftly makes a sculptural statement out of an inconveniently located tree. The house unfolds on arrival. A new spiral staircase in black steel at the rear of the house juxtaposes sympathetically with the white timber walls and leads to a detached studio.”

 

D. COFFEE CULTURE THE CROSSING

The Crowne Plaza by Robert Weir of Weir Architecture received the Commercial/Industrial Architectural Design Award. Weir Architecture was tasked with transforming an existing damaged office building into a new dynamic luxurious hotel. Featuring 204 spacious and modern hotel rooms, combined with the best views that Christchurch City has, the hotel sits proudly within the Performing Arts Precinct, bringing life and vitality back into the city.

Meanwhile, the 2019 Resene Colour in Design Award went to ‘Coffee Culture The Crossing’ by Chris Wheeler of Hierarchy Architecture. The judges said that the stunning, neutral palette evokes style, warmth and grace.

 

 


 

Sustainability in architecture: Allfrey + South

With interest growing in sustainable lifestyles, we caught up with architect Craig South of Allfrey + South Architects for his thoughts on the role architecture has to play in the sustainability equation.

 

 

 

Sustainability means different things to different people. As an architect, what does sustainability mean to you?
I think we all have our own ideas on what comprises a sustainable lifestyle. For some people, it has a lot to do with location and wanting to live close to where they work. For others, it may be about choosing a home with a smaller footprint or wanting to install solar panels. In our practice, we listen closely to our clients and are very happy to work with them to achieve their particular goals in this area.

Discussing sustainability in architecture might once have been considered a little unorthodox, but it is now an almost universal aspiration for people to want to live in well-insulated, energy-efficient homes. We live in a world where we have to make more sustainable choices and, as a practice, this is something we consciously and actively accept. We currently have a number of projects underway from alterations to new passive houses that set very high sustainability standards.


Why is sustainable architecture important?
We want to create beautiful architecture that people can enjoy living in, so there’s still a balance that needs to be struck. It would be a mistake to prioritise sustainability above all else but, of course, it makes absolute sense to include sustainability features because these result in warmer, drier, healthier homes that are more fun to live in. Who wouldn’t want that?

Rather than designing to code, we always aim well above that in terms of insulation, ventilation, solar heating and so on. It’s not just us being ‘eco-conscious’. Many of our clients want to go down this route because it makes so much sense. While above code projects may cost more upfront, the benefits are ongoing in terms of delivering power savings and a comfortable way of life. From a re-sale perspective, homes designed for sustainability will also remain more attractive in the long-term and continue to hold their value.


What is Allfrey + South’s approach to sustainability?
It is part of our baseline commitment to our clients and, by setting the bar high, we hope we can help inspire others to follow our lead. Fundamental elements of sustainable architecture include orientation that appropriately considers sun, shade and wind; and having high standards of insulation (including the slab) and ventilation. By ventilation, I don’t necessarily mean mechanical ventilation; good natural ventilation can be achieved through effective window design that promotes air flow and air quality. Recycled materials can come into the sustainability equation too, though often we find it is the heritage value of such materials that are particularly valued.

Fundamentally, we are guided by respect for our clients and will always work to achieve their lifestyle goals. How far we can go down the sustainability road is largely dependent on the conversations we have with them. It is a real pleasure to work with clients who are passionate about sustainability and want to share their journey towards a better way of life with us.

www.allso.co.nz

 

Architect Craig South
Craig South

 


 

Naked Architecture


Choice – that’s what we need; a way in which each of us can individually live happily in our increasingly complex world.

 

 

 

Now, more than ever, people really do want greater choice around how they live in the urban environment. And internationally, a growing array of solutions are emerging to answer that urgent need. We are diverse, our needs differ and the days of the one-stop solution are long gone. In architecture, a new trend is allowing buyers individual choice even within the walls of one block.

‘Naked Architecture’ offers its end users the exciting ability to buy ‘shell space’ with no pre-imposed layout, giving them the opportunity to think about their own individual requirements within the space. The shell can then be fitted out to suit any individual’s needs and budget. In an inspired move towards individual choice, buyers can now tailor-make their own solutions and configure their own designs, with the assistance of the resident architect.

This innovative new architecture means that no two units need be the same, and each unit can work with the light and boundaries of its individual space – the possibilities are as varied as the buyers.

In a city such as Christchurch, which has already embraced massive change after the earthquakes, the opportunity to create anew has caused many of us to re-think our needs. ‘Naked Architecture’ embraces the need for individual choice – a chance to make personal decisions about personal space, and an opportunity to live more comfortably in our urban environment. Everybody benefits, happiness spreads – and Christchurch becomes an increasingly interesting and diverse city.

 

 


 

Head-turning Homes: Metro Advances


Five high-end townhouses at 55 Bishop Street have the best of everything – a head-turning design in cedar, with distinctive extras in the mix.

 

 

In the tranquillity of a quiet tree-lined St Albans street, these freehold three-bedroom apartments have just been completed – with two having sold already.

Nigel and Julie Lundy of Metro Advances Ltd chose the sizeable parcel of land, once the site of a derelict villa, for its fantastic location. The company has completed a large number of quality builds in recent years, including, in addition to their specialty quality housing, commercial investments such as the office building at 254 St Asaph Street (Unknown Chapter café), the popular Southwark Apartments hotel complex, and the Stor-Ezi storage units at 62 Factory Road, Belfast.

The company’s Project Manager Gabby Stockman says after a carefully executed design and consent stage, the build has taken a full year. “No shortcuts have been taken with the build; it’s quality all the way. They are on the right side of the street for really good sun in the living areas, and are a short walking distance into town. And the cafés of Edgeware village are not far either.”

 

Gabby has another strong family connection to property, as she is Shaun Stockman’s daughter. Shaun is renowned for developing CBD icons such as the award-winning Billens Building.

Both Metro and Shaun utilise the talented flair of architect Andrew Evans.

Under a pitched iron roof, the sumptuous golden cedar blends effortlessly with Rockcote. This exclusive, no-expense-spared design culminates in a striking street appeal. Builder Jack Forrest has also crafted some stunning boxed windows for extra space.

“One great feature is the really good-sized bedrooms, which is a rarity in new townhouses these days,” she says.

“The thick double-framed inter-tenancy walls are well-insulated for warmth and privacy. We have kept the interior décor light and bright with LED lighting, light-grey tiling, carpet and ‘Mt Aspiring’ painted walls.”

 

For the kitchen, Gabby chose either a timeless light walnut grain or natural wood, with all-white stone benches, pendant lighting, induction hobs, and reliable Omega appliances. “An architectural-designed steel rail leads to the ample landing space, which is large enough for a study nook. We always utilise every space as best as we can.”

The fully-tiled bathrooms have had no expense spared, with Italian-made black tapware, light timber-veneered vanity and a separate stone wash-bowl. The concrete-look tiled walls are simultaneously modern, classic and practical. The entrance is a beautiful cedar door, giving a Scandinavian-spa touch and that calming woody scent.

The middle units of the freehold townhouses are a comfortable 145sqm with single garaging, a private courtyard of aggregate and grass, and a tenancy fence of hardwood horizontal slats.

The larger back unit has a 175sqm footprint and two-car garaging. The wooden patio is built around an existing fruit-bearing feijoa tree. One of its three bedrooms is conveniently downstairs, and the main bathroom is embellished with a feature wall and a double-sized shower.

“These townhouses will suit so many people – young families, families with teenagers, retirees or professionals; anyone who wants an extremely low-maintenance home for years to come.”

Priced affordably for its unique quality, 55 Bishop Street (55B and 55E) in St Albans can viewed at www.harcourts.co.nz or contact Richard Dawson of Harcourts on 021 387 105.

 

 


 

Opening new doors on city living: Allfrey + South Architects


Buyers seeking a newly built city apartment will find plenty on the market. But what if people want something else, something more connected and affordable? Architect Craig South explores what this ‘something else’ could look like and how it could transform how we live.

 

PHOTO BY CHRISTCHURCHNZ

 

I was recently invited to contribute to a New Zealand Institute of Architects’ forum on the subject of emerging trends in city living in Christchurch. As one of the speakers, I was pleased to give a talk on co-housing and the work our practice has been doing in this area for the Peterborough Housing Co-operative. We have been privileged to lead the design of this new pocket neighbourhood over the past three years as the project has evolved. The development includes both private homes and shared facilities, clustered around a large central courtyard.

The co-housing approach is instinctively attractive because it connects with our ideals of wanting to live well in small communities and of wanting to live more simply and more sustainably.

Now more than ever, people really do want greater choice around how they live in the urban environment. Internationally, we are seeing the emergence of a growing array of solutions to answer that consumer trend. For example, ‘Naked Architecture’ offers buyers the ability to buy ‘shell space’ with no pre-imposed layout so that it can then be finished and fitted out to suit personal needs and budget. The idea is that two different potential buyers will likely have two very different sets of lifestyle priorities, so it makes sense to let them decide how they want to configure their own space.

Sparking a lot of interest in Australia right now, too, is the Nightingale model. This is an innovative, architect-led approach to apartment development that seeks to prioritise social, environmental and financial sustainability. With profits capped, projects are crowdfunded through an ethical investment model and transparency around costs and governance – it’s an approach that is proving very popular (each project to date has been completely pre-sold via ballot).

Of course, the reason why models like this resonate so well is they offer more control. Future residents have a say on key design decisions, such as how much car parking to include or whether to have any shared facilities. They call the shots on whether to have a swimming pool or communal barbecue area.

In my view, any kind of shared, multi-residential arrangement could only succeed if all those buying into it were on the same page, sharing a similar vision. As well, there would need to be clear and effective ground rules in place to minimise any potential misunderstandings or conflicts.

Could something like the Nightingale model work in Christchurch? Certainly, I think it offers some exciting potential for those interested in pooling their resources to get the kind of city lifestyle they want within a multi-residential setting.

Having held a number of interactive forums on architecture this year, through our ArchiChat Group sessions, I’m aware that many people would certainly welcome more choice in this area of urban housing development. At our next round of ArchiChat in November, we will be seeking to gauge interest in potentially trialling this approach at a Christchurch site. Whether you are a developer, builder or potential home buyer, we would welcome your input – register at info@allso.co.nz.

www.allso.co.nz

 

Architect Craig South
Craig South

 

Exceptional versatility: Weir Architecture


One word encapsulates the work of the team at Weir Architecture – versatility. “We are working all around the South Island at the moment,” Managing Director Robert Weir says. “There are projects underway in Nelson, Wanaka, Queenstown, the West Coast, Akaroa and in Christchurch and every one of these projects is different.”

 

 

The locations demonstrate versatility and so does the work – from a large rest home, apartments and other industrial projects in Nelson, to architectural homes in Queenstown, baches in Akaroa, houses on the West Coast and hotels and restaurant fit-outs in Christchurch.

“It is so easy today with our communication systems to undertake work anywhere. Simple too, to just jump on a plane, or into a car and drive to site if we need to. I’ve driven to Wanaka and back in a day a number of times.”

As can be seen from the range of projects underway, Weir Architecture doesn’t specialise in any one sector of architecture, but works across all aspects. “My associates Raymond Barnes and John Pettersen and I have decades of experience in all forms of design and construction to offer clients.”

One thing that is a constant at Weir Architecture is listening to what clients want. “Our clients are at the centre of all our processes. Taking the time to understand their requirements is crucial to producing designs that fulfil a brief. Each project is looked at on its own merits and with an absolutely open mind.”

This client-focused approach has resulted in many architectural awards over the years. “We are thrilled to have won this year’s regional architectural design award for ‘Residential New Home over 300m2’. It’s a beachside house on Christchurch’s North Shore and it was designed to harmonise with the clients’ family lifestyle and use of spaces.”

On a larger scale, but still very much in accordance with the client’s brief, is another 2019 award winner – the transformation of the former Forsyth Barr office tower into a dynamic luxurious hotel – the new Christchurch Crowne Plaza. “This was definitely a challenging project requiring lateral thinking and all our combined experience to resolve – but the outcome earned us a commercial/industrial design award.”

 

 


 

Salvaging a local landmark: The Pump House


The restoration of the historic Pump House on Tuam Street is complete, after an extensive two-year repair and earthquake strengthening project – salvaging a unique link to our city’s heritage.

 

 

Originally built more than 100 years ago in the 1880s, the Pump House is a collection of five buildings that once served as Christchurch’s purpose-built sewerage system. By the end of the 1950s, the plant was no longer used and in the late 1980s, City Salvage Contractors co-owner Paddy Snowden and his wife Jackie bought the property to use as a demolition yard.

The Pump House is a local landmark. Set amongst a spacious yard filled with various items saved from demolition, or bits and pieces Paddy has purchased and collected over the years – from hand-painted stained-glass windows and old movie props to salvaged timber, iron gates and church pews – the picturesque buildings have also been used for a fashion shoot and a wedding photo backdrop.

 

 

Featuring brick and Oamaru stone construction, attractive arched windows and gables with round windows, the buildings have a distinctive charisma. Remarkably, they stood up to the 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes, but were no longer safe. While the stonework had slowly deteriorated over the years, it wasn’t until the repair began that it became clear how much other serious maintenance was required.

Once the earthquake strengthening plan – designed by CGW Consulting Engineers – was finalised and the tender let, the work began in earnest, in late 2017. Each building needed an individual approach, including foundation re-enforcement, core drilling, crack stitching and rebuilding of gables. Three of the buildings needed total roof replacements and a completely new timber ceiling was installed in one of them.

 

 

In addition, crumbling stonework was replaced and extensive plaster finishing applied. Internal walls with mismatched, patchy paintwork cleaned up beautifully with media blasting. The multipaned metal windows throughout the buildings were painstakingly stripped and painted. Downpipes and rainheads, salvaged from the former Sunnyside Hospital 25 years ago, were used to replace the deteriorated or missing ones.

While in keeping with the industrial design, Paddy, who has a passion for old buildings, incorporated historic detail and character where he could, such as antique rosebricks and handrails. In addition to their own investment in the project, Paddy and Jackie are grateful for grants from Christchurch City Council and the Ministry of Culture and Heritage. “Much more work was needed than was originally budgeted for, so we wouldn’t have been able to complete this without them.”

 

 

Now that the five buildings have been fully earthquake strengthened, they have fantastic potential for future use – perhaps a functions venue, a gallery, workshops or offices – who knows? Jackie says the project has been a huge learning curve. “As well as being an important link to our past, we hope the buildings will remain a unique part of the cityscape for many years to come. We are so pleased to have played a part in their story.”

 

 

 


 

Affordability and the culture trap: Linetype Architectural


When it comes to houses, there are certain ergonomic features that make a space function, but it’s hard to argue for a need when spaces get larger than necessity dictates. However, strip a design back to necessity and we might be disappointed with what we are presented.

 

A HOUSE ON A HILL BY LINETYPE ARCHITECTURAL, 2 BEDROOMS AND 150M2.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY DENNIS RADERMACHER.

 

Therefore, it’s important to recognise we have cultural values overlying some basic needs that tell us when a space is adequate or not. I suspect that growing up in a colony, where land was once cheap and stretching one’s legs caused no harm, has bequeathed a luxurious expectation of space that is hard to extinguish. Of the prince and the pauper, the pauper seemed to have it good, but when life is going in the other direction, it causes much more angst.

This kind of lifestyle has gone unchallenged for several generations but is increasingly coming under scrutiny: climate change; urban sprawl; affordability. If I’m honest, I struggle with an internal conflict that recognises these factors but still wants a generosity of space.

Perhaps it is just a matter of me, and New Zealand culture, naturally growing up from that colonist mentality. Commute distances will cause us to value the density of cities and that value will supersede the one of space. The trouble is that the process doesn’t happen uniformly. Plus it happens slowly, and time is not on our side. The temptation may always be there to look to your neighbour with twice as much space. If you are building, challenge yourself. Big is not better, enough is enough.

 

 

By Linetype Architectural Architect Ben Brady

 


 

A Home with Hygge: Fleetwood Construction


If the Danish term ‘hygge’ is defined as a quality of cosiness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or wellbeing, this Gold Award-winning home built by Fleetwood Construction has it, well, in bucketloads.

 

 

The home – a happy collaboration between the homeowners, Matt Gutsell of Sheppard and Rout Architects, and Fleetwood Construction – is the fourth Gold Award win in the Master Builders House of the Year competitions for Directors Sam and Charlotte Fleetwood, and is amongst the top 100 in New Zealand to get a Gold Reserve Award, putting it in the national finals for the competition later this year.

While it helps that one of the owners hails from Denmark, this home’s innate hygge is a reflection of the couple’s passion for the home and their detailed design choices, which included bringing light fittings back from Denmark. Feelings of home, comfort and welcome are encapsulated in the setting, exterior, and interior of the Governors Bay split-level design.

With the house as the stage, the view down Lyttelton Harbour to the heads leads a starry cast of features. “Matt did an amazing job of designing the home and maximising the view,” Sam says.

 

A stunning slender veranda acting as both viewing platform and outdoor hallway is fitted with attractive vertical metal privacy panels on rollers. “They look like a design feature but are actually practical for shade and wind protection,” Sam says.

The custom-made floating staircase leads you to the entrance of the home and in to the combined kitchen living area which reveals the amazing view. The chic kitchen shows great attention to detail and is a perfect design fit for the style of the home. “The island bench in matte black with a slim stainless steel bench top and modular detailing really draws you in, the hygge is here,” Sam says.

Sleek floor to ceiling sliding doors frame the living rooms’ view and again in the master bedroom, “you just don’t want to leave”.

Sam says skilled hill-builders Fleetwood Construction loves building architectural homes. “The team loves the attention to detail and craftmanship required.”

 

With Sam onsite every day overseeing the details, any challenges run smoothly and it gives clients confidence and the great service they deserve. “This home had eight different types of foundations and retaining walls, a 22-metre long steel frame and a 4.6-metre precast concrete panel, which all had to be fitted with precision. The access to the site made this challenging but the team totally nailed it. It was great to have this hard work and craftmanship recognised at the awards.”

With plenty of architectural masterpieces in the pipeline, Fleetwood Construction is looking forward to next year’s competition. “We work hard everyday to create Christchurch’s most personalised building experience.”

 


 

Celebrating the city’s architecture


An executive home inspired by the work of Sir Miles Warren and a school playground in the sky were just two of the award-winning designs celebrated on Friday 2 August at the Canterbury/Westland Regional ADNZ Resene Architectural Design Awards.

 

CRAIG SOUTH HOME AWAY FROM HOME

 

Every year, the ADNZ Resene Architectural Design Awards celebrate innovative, sustainable and exceptionally designed projects from around New Zealand. Awarding designs in multiple categories, the awards programme recognises residential, commercial, alterations, interiors and multi-use projects designed by members of Architectural Designers New Zealand (ADNZ).

This year, 22 awards were given to 13 designers from the Canterbury region. The award winners were Julie Villard of Bob Burnett Architecture, Nic Curragh of Objects Ltd, Greg Young of Young Architects, Ben Brady of Linetype Architectural, Robert Weir of Weir Architecture, Pippin Wright-Stow of F3 Design, Aaron Jones of Urban Function Architecture, Chris Wheeler of Hierarchy Architecture, Barry Connor of Barry Connor Design Limited, Bob Burnett of Bob Burnett Architecture, Craig South of Allfrey + South Architects Ltd, Gary Todd of Gary Todd Architecture Ltd, and Fiona Macpherson of Fiona Macpherson Architecture.

 

ROBERT WEIR CHAMBERLAIN, BEACHSIDE

Greg Young of Young Architects was a major award winner on the night, taking home three regional awards for two projects.

Aaron Jones of Urban Function Architecture received four awards for four projects. He received a Commercial Interior Architecture Design Award for the work on his own design studio, titled ‘Urbanfunction + Zerobag Studios’.

Julie Villard of Bob Burnett Architecture won the Residential Compact New Home up to 150m2 Architectural Design Award for ‘Boat Shed House – Lyttelton’.

Nic Curragh of Objects Ltd won the Residential New Home between 150m2 and 300m2 Architectural Design Award for his project ‘Red Rock Lane’.

 

CRAIG SOUTH HOME AWAY FROM HOME

Ben Brady of Linetype Architectural won the Residential Alterations and Additions Architectural Design Award for ‘Esplanade Alterations’. Ben Brady also received a Highly Commended Award in the Residential Compact New Home up to 150m2 category for his work on a Little Akaloa bach, titled ‘Sea Call’.

Robert Weir of Weir Architecture received the Commercial/Industrial Architectural Design Award for his work on the Crowne Plaza in Christchurch’s central city and a Highly Commended Award in the Residential New Home over 300m2 category for his work on a modern Waimairi Beach home titled ‘Chamberlain, Beachside’.

Pippin Wright-Stow of F3 Design won two awards for his work on ‘Sky Playground’ located at Cathedral Grammar School. The playground design won the Resene Colour in Design Award and a Highly Commended Award in the Commercial/Industrial category.

Chris Wheeler of Hierarchy Architecture won two awards for Coffee Culture located at The Crossing in the central city. He won the Resene Colour in Design Award and Commercial Interior Architecture Design Award.

 

ROBERT WEIR CROWNE PLAZA