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Surprising & Smart


There is nothing so gripping as a mystery slowly revealed and that is what you get with this surprising and smart Marama Crescent home, designed by Ben Brady of Linetype Architecture and built by Dean Harrison from H3 Builders.

 

 

At street level, the observer sees the garage and entry way, angular and facetted in stack bond concrete block.

Those who make it across the threshold then see the home expand into the courtyard downstairs, with a stimulating range of spaces and orientations.

The sloping site generated three levels: entry, down to main living and master bedroom, down to two further bedrooms on the lowest level.

Extensive glazing provides sight-lines through the building to capture views of the city around to the Kaikoura Ranges, from that vantage.

Large windows frame the vistas from each room while clerestory glazing above the living room captures light.

With easy care in mind, the owners sought low maintenance and solidity, choosing cladding in powder coated aluminium in Bronco and Canvas Cloth, with colourfast timber composite Innowood.

They also briefed a concrete floor to provide solidity, building performance and heat, but this required a robust structure involving plenty of steel with panels underneath, designed by Ben.

“There are almost as many structural drawings as architectural drawings for the house,” he says.

Connected yet separate spaces are a feature, as is a blurred concept of inside and out.

Concrete block is used inside as interior pillars, and an off-form concrete beam plus the courtyard extend in to support the top-level landing.

Vaulted stagger patterned poplar plywood ceiling, in the living areas connect them to the upper level.

Ben found Dean impressive to work with. “He needed very few calls to get his head around the structure. He is so enthusiastic, with high standards and close attention paid to sequencing.”

Dean says, “We loved the build complexity: angles, three-storeys and the sheer variety of elements, which included exposed insitu concrete beams, honed concrete blocks, pre-finished cladding and timber ceiling.”

Hands-on every day from shovelling mud, to project management, Dean loves the challenge of a hill site.

“Ben’s plans were great and he is easy to work with: always ready to discuss ideas and solutions. The enjoyable challenge created a really great house.”


 

Embracing Design Practice


From small scale pavilion installations to large multi-unit developments, digital design technologies are radically shaping new avenues of design in architecture.

 

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY FIRTH

 

Imagine being able to seamlessly collaborate between designers, clients, iwis, artists, consultants, and the council; produce designs without having to ‘draw’ a single line; undertake multiple design explorations in a fraction of the time of conventional methods; optimise material usage; minimise project waste and cost; and immerse yourself virtually in the design from concept to completion.

These are just a few of the real-world applications of digital design technologies available to designers today and this is just the tip of the iceberg.

By utilising digital design technologies in partnership with digital-led fabrication methods, we will start to see a challenge of the status quo on a commercial scale.

Instead of mass production we will see mass customisation, a process of file to fabrication, a reduction of time it takes to construct a building and a reduction of misinterpretations between those involved.

I believe that applying these digital technologies balances the ever-increasing demands of the built environment and produces refined architectural outcomes.

Be it a house extension or a new multi-unit development, why not take advantage of all the tools at hand and create something truly rewarding with a tailored fit?

 

BY WSP ARCHITECTURAL GRADUATE DANIEL CROOKS

 

Collaborative Luxury


CoLab Architecture proved itself the superlative choice to design the three luxury homes on the stunning site vacated by historic Parkdale. CoLab Director Tobin Smith designed styles complementary to the outcomes the developers sought for this very distinct niche and, as the name over the door suggests, collaborative work is a specialty.

 

 

The Heaton street frontage forms part of the city’s character assessment area.

Tobin wanted to keep the scale of the original homes in the area but not replicate them.

“CoLab is creating a new heritage that we hope will still be celebrated in 100 years’ time,” Tobin says.

“We have a style that is becoming recognisable and you can see it particularly in the rear house with its strong gable forms that are part of the illustrious Christchurch school of architecture. Brick cladding honours the original homestead, it is soft and in keeping with the area.”

Each home is distinct: “Resorting to three identical builds for efficiency’s sake was never contemplated,” Tobin says.

“The site and the community deserved the best in design and construction.”

Each home does however have a generous envelope, with the beautiful stream and surrounds as the focus.

“The art of it was the design and position to maximise privacy and outlook.”

Takahe Construction led on bringing the homes to life.

“They brought a proven track record to the project and there is such strength in collaboration. There was incredibly valuable feedback going back and forth between us as we put the houses together – it creates a learning environment all around,” Tobin says.

“The level of finish achieved in these homes and the quality craftsmanship are second to none.”

Tim Forman of Takahe says, “In partnership with CoLab, the team at Takahe and its subcontractors were driven by quality throughout these builds, with a clear understanding of CoLab’s vision. It’s been a real pleasure to work with such a positive and encouraging team.

“The architecture was challenging and extremely detailed and, by all accounts, an incredible experience to bring this to life. V grooved cathedral ceilings with clean negative details are a real feature that continue throughout the form of the houses,” Tim says.


 

Big plans for redevelopment


The appointment of Weir Architecture to transform the Hereford Street office block that once housed Scorpio books into a stylish boutique hotel, assures Christchurch of a delicious treat to be sampled in around 18 months. National Award Architectural winner in 2019 for The Crown Plaza Christchurch project, Weir Architecture has stunning plans for the building which forms part of the Hilton Tapestry group.

 

Strengthened, remodelled and with a top floor added, the hotel will be named The Modern.

Destined to become one of the city’s treasures, it will feature a retro interior – a fabulous take on the 1960’s modern era of interiors. Robert Weir, Director of Weir Architecture says the company sought something completely unique to Christchurch and realised the proponents of art, architecture, furniture and interior design of the 1960s in Christchurch should be celebrated.

Inspired by local artists’ works stored at COCA, as well as local titans Miles Warren and Peter Beaven, plus international architecture stars of the 60s, the furniture and artworks will be authentic.

The theme dictates the colour palette, the use of timber, leather, carpeting, and wall finishes in panelling and wallpaper.

Robert is lead consultant, working with developer Tailorspace and the hotel will be operated by the Sarin Group.

Hosting 70 rooms, the ground floor restaurant and café bar will be operated by the hotel, and we can look forward to a visit in 18 months.

“It’s really exciting to be working on this sophisticated hotel redevelopment and it’s always wonderful to work with a strong brand such as Hilton,” Robert says.


 

The story of an icon


Christchurch’s proud tradition of exceptional public architecture is evident in one of the city’s favourite buildings – the Christchurch Town Hall.

 

 

Playing prestigious host to numerous celebrations, concerts and civic events over the years, the building once described as the city’s ‘public living room’ reopened triumphantly in 2019 after a successful campaign for its restoration.

Through the tortuous beginnings of the original project, to the battle to save the complex post-quake, a new book published by Canterbury University Press, captures an intimate story of the building’s survival.

It was a fitting project for former Associate Professor of Art History at UC Dr Ian Lochhead who edited The Christchurch Town Hall 1965–2019: A dream renewed.

Dr Lochhead was an early advocate of repair and restoration, expressed his views in a piece titled ‘Let our public living room live again’ published in The Press on 20 March 2012.

When the facility opened to much fanfare and civic interest in 1972, the auditorium in particular was unlike anything seen in New Zealand before, Dr Lochhead explains.

While Sir Miles Warren led the creative architectural team (establishing the reputation of Warren & Mahoney nationally), it was Sir Harold Marshall who was responsible for the world-class acoustics that changed the way concert halls around the world were designed from that point on.

The quality of Marshall’s acoustic design attracted performers of the calibre of Leonard Bernstein, Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Carlos Santana and, just last month, renowned cellist YoYo Ma, and saw Christchurch recognised alongside the great concert halls of Vienna, Boston and Lucerne. The Philharmonie de Paris, which opened in 2015, took its design cues from the Christchurch Town Hall, to the extent that the French employed Marshall Day Acoustics, the practice established by Harold Marshall in 1981.

The compelling story of the incredibly challenging restoration is recounted in chapters by Peter Marshall and John Hare and captured in photos by former UC photographer Duncan Shaw-Brown and by Olivia Spencer-Bower.

UC returned to the Town Hall for its graduation ceremonies in 2019, one of many key Christchurch organisations to again use this much-loved space for their most important celebrations.

The Christchurch Town Hall 1965–2019: A dream renewed, edited by Dr Ian Lochhead, is available now in hardback edition and online.


 

Designing beautiful spaces


To celebrate their new Christchurch studio, Ignite Architects hosted clients and industry partners at their innovative Sudima Laneway home.

 

At the event, Ignite commissioned local artist Mario Luz to create a live art work for a charity auction, with proceeds going to the Laura Fergusson Trust Canterbury.

The studio is part of a mixed-use project designed by Ignite, with the stunning new 5-Star Sudima Hotel complementing the commercial and hospitality spaces.

During the opening, Ignite Managing Director Jeremy Whelan told guests, “We’re very proud of our contributions to the urban design fabric of Christchurch and the ongoing development of the South Island region. This year, we’ve invested further by opening our Queenstown studio.”

The team in the South Island continues to grow and the diversity of their experience and strong team culture allows them to take an integrated, holistic design approach to projects of varying scale and complexity, both local and international.

“Our point of difference is a rigorous design process that marries creativity with functionality. We pride ourselves in our ability to work empathetically and collaboratively with all stakeholders,” Ignite Director Grant Armstrong says.

“And we’re very happy to share this milestone with our community here in Christchurch.”

 

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1.JEREMY WHELAN

2.JULIAN BUTSON, SAM YAU, PETER McMENAMIN

3.JAKE ABBOT, SZYMON GOZDZIKOWSKI

4.TAINA SCUR, RODRIGO HEPP, WAYNE O’DONNEL

5.KIRI SHUKER, SAMIR GOVIND

6.ENRICA FLORE, SARA O’DONNEL, JEREMY DUNLOP


 

Approaching alterations: Linetype Architectural


Having recently received a National Award at the 2019 ADNZ Resene Architectural Design Awards in the Additions and Alterations Category, I thought it timely to share a few thoughts on my approach to altering houses. Often there is already a good amount of dollar value in the existing house, so one needs to be careful and pragmatic about where and how to spend any money on it.

 

PHOTO: DENNIS RADERMACHER

 

I like to explore the ways in which the house is currently working, both aesthetically and functionally. To love what is there avoids a fight to change it into something it is not. A 1950’s bungalow, unless a lot of money is spent, will always look like a 1950’s bungalow.

Commonly, a house has been altered in the past and it is first an exercise in restoring logic. Why is there a porch halfway down the corridor when the entrance is now through the living area? Sometimes it is a very simple case of relocating a couple of doors and internal partitions to make a major difference. The aspiration, once work is complete, should be to have the house feel like it was always meant to be that way.

When looking at any new requirements, the house needs to deliver for its occupants, so my first study is where these needs can be accommodated within the building footprint. If possible, major cost can be avoided by redistributing spaces within the house. If there is a need to push out, do it carefully so that it complements the existing house.

 

By Linetype Architectural Architect Ben Brady

 

 


 

It’s all in the detail: Davinia Sutton


Multi award-winning Christchurch designer Davinia Sutton’s stunning kitchen and bathroom projects for two Canterbury homes were recognised at the recent 2019 National Kitchen and Bathroom Association Awards (NKBA) New Zealand, where she was also named 2019 Designer of the Year.

 

 

Held in Melbourne, Davinia Sutton of Detail by Davinia Sutton attained 12 awards altogether on the night, with the majority of the accolades won for the two homes. One of the projects (pictured), constructed by Ainsworth Builders and manufactured by Ashburton Joinery, was a large open kitchen featuring traditional cabinetry, a custom-made steel rangehood, a dark-stained solid timber island bench top, brick bond tiled splashback, off-white joinery and engineered stone.

Described as elegant, well-proportioned and textural, the design incorporated the early 1900’s architecture of the home. The ‘elegant and refined’ bathroom ensuite from the same home renovation also received two awards, featuring a ‘stunning tessellate tile floor of white and charcoal.’

The second award-winning kitchen, constructed by Mike Greer Architectural and manufactured by Woodshack Kitchens, blended effortlessly into the beautiful architecturally designed family home – sleek and modern, with an urban edge. The home’s award-winning bathroom featured a bold palette, with the selection of finishes providing a sense of sharpness and personality.

Davinia says the awards are a great reflection of local workmanship and it’s a privilege to be recognised by industry peers. “NKBA is an amazing organisation that really supports designers and the awards provide a fantastic launching pad and exposure that can lead to international recognition.”

Contact Detail by Davinia Sutton on 03 356 2722 or visit www.daviniasutton.com.

 

 


 

Real lives behind the architecture: Allfrey + South


From the outside, the practice of architecture may seem a little formal. Architect Craig South, of Allfrey + South Architects, says greater openness can change perceptions and promote positive outcomes.

 

 

When I first started out in this industry more than 20 years ago, I’m sure I would have thought that creative skills alone held the key to great design. In fact, as I’ve discovered, it invariably evolves out of building good relationships with clients; spending time with them on-site and getting to know their lifestyle and aspirations. You really can’t do that effectively without also sharing something of yourself along the way. Equally, good open communication is fundamental to building a healthy, friendly work environment. Once barriers start coming down between people, the relationships that form are generally very positive and productive.

As barrier busters go, my family’s Newfoundland puppy, Murphy, is proving a real champ. I’ve recently started bringing him into the studio with me. What a great experience it has been for everyone – so far, at least! Studies suggest that pets in the workplace are fantastic at relieving stress and encouraging social interaction. Dogs have been a fixture at Amazon for many years now and I can see why; having Murphy around the office encourages the team to take breaks away from their desks and lifts the overall mood. Of course, he’s a distraction to an extent, but a happy one and I think ultimately, we will all benefit.

I’m impressed at how chilled and relaxed Murphy is, both at home with my three daughters – aged 15, 13 and 10 – and in the studio, his calm nature seems to rub off on everyone that meets him. The plan is to have Murphy in the studio three days a week and, until he’s fully trained, he will spend most of his time hanging out in the office courtyard awaiting cuddles and pats. I’ve yet to meet anyone who can resist his ineffable ‘Newfie’ charm.

He will also be joining us at Allfrey + South’s Open Studio session later this month (29 November). This is an informal opportunity to drop by, ask a few questions and get to know us all a little better. Those with an interest in craft beer might be interested in the ‘brew day’ feature of the afternoon as I experiment with a new batch, and there may be an opportunity to sample some of my other home brew too!

During our Open Studio, you will find all of the Allfrey + South team are happy to share perspectives on architectural trends and innovations, as well as interests outside the office. Our website has been running some interesting stories from staff this year with blogs on a variety of topics from furniture restoration and small apartment living to travel experiences. It has made me appreciate what a diverse group we are, with many different outlooks and hobbies. While we are all employed in the same architecture sphere, we bring a range of experiences and talents to the practice.

All of this feeds back into an exceptional service for our clients, focused on celebrating their uniqueness in turn so as to create truly bespoke homes.

Meanwhile, I’m sure there will be many more updates to come on Murphy, who is still only at the start of his very own journey towards becoming a fully-grown dog! He may be small now, but he may eventually tip the scales at around 70kg!

www.allso.co.nz

 

Architect Craig South
Craig South

 


 

Canterbury designers take a bow


Six out of the 10 award-winning projects at the 2019 ADNZ Resene Architectural Design Awards, one of New Zealand’s most prestigious architecture awards, are by Christchurch designers. 145 entries were received from some of the most talented designers across the country. The awards were held on Friday 18 October in Queenstown.

 

A. HEREFORD APARTMENTS

 

The Christchurch winners were Greg Young of Young Architects, Nic Curragh of Objects Ltd, Ben Brady of Linetype Architectural, Robert Weir of Weir Architecture and Chris Wheeler of Hierarchy Architecture.

Greg Young from Young Architects won two awards for two different projects; the 2019 Residential New Home over 300m2 Architectural Design Award for a Merivale project titled ‘Gable Silhouette’, and the Residential Multi-Unit Dwelling Architectural Design Award for ‘Hereford Apartments’.

 

B. GABLE SILHOUETTE

 

A simple family home, ‘Gable Silhouette’ is all about the enjoyment of living. The aesthetic has been inspired by the early work of Sir Miles Warren and the architecture of Central Otago. The other award-winning project, created by Young, was the design of four one-bedroom apartments on a 405sqm site in the inner city, with judges describing the four tiny single-bedroom units as being of rare spatial quality.

Nic Curragh of Objects Ltd won the Residential New Home between 150m2 and 300m2 Architectural Design Award for his project ‘Red Rock Lane’. Nestled into a terraced hillside site in Redcliffs, this two-bedroom house has been positioned to enjoy the view east to the Southern Alps. All living spaces are accommodated on the first floor within two dark-stained cedar box forms. The more dominant north box, with its extensively glazed lounge, cantilevers out dramatically over a 13m lap pool and pool room.

 

C. ESPLANADE ALTERATIONS

Ben Brady of Linetype Architectural won the Residential Alterations and Additions Architectural Design Award for his Sumner project titled ‘Esplanade Alterations’. A light hand was required on this 100-year-old arts and crafts villa. Although already renovated and earthquake repaired, the home required an alteration with more foresight and a big picture perspective to make it suitable for modern life while retaining and enhancing its character features.

Judge’s said Brady had given the grand old house a new lease on life through an alteration that brings out its best.

“Restrained interior choices give it lightness and foregrounds the original features of the house. The entrance deftly makes a sculptural statement out of an inconveniently located tree. The house unfolds on arrival. A new spiral staircase in black steel at the rear of the house juxtaposes sympathetically with the white timber walls and leads to a detached studio.”

 

D. COFFEE CULTURE THE CROSSING

The Crowne Plaza by Robert Weir of Weir Architecture received the Commercial/Industrial Architectural Design Award. Weir Architecture was tasked with transforming an existing damaged office building into a new dynamic luxurious hotel. Featuring 204 spacious and modern hotel rooms, combined with the best views that Christchurch City has, the hotel sits proudly within the Performing Arts Precinct, bringing life and vitality back into the city.

Meanwhile, the 2019 Resene Colour in Design Award went to ‘Coffee Culture The Crossing’ by Chris Wheeler of Hierarchy Architecture. The judges said that the stunning, neutral palette evokes style, warmth and grace.