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Bealey Avenue medical complex

A healthy development: Bealey Avenue medical complex

Contributing to the re-burgeoning inner city, a new medical complex development is underway – set in a prime location alongside other specialist health services on Bealey Avenue.

Bealey Avenue medical complex
Neighbouring Pegasus Health and situated close to Southern Cross Hospital, as well as Sports Med and Avenue Health, the complex was designed by CoLab Architecture and constructed by Buildwell Developments.
Due for completion in September, two out of the three spaces in the building have already been secured by tenants – Bealey Ave Pharmacy and a national dental practice. The remaining tenancy, a generous 253.3m² space, is still available, says CBRE leasing agent Anna Morawlec.

“We are looking for another medical related tenant to complement the others in the building – it’s a fantastic opportunity to be a part of this modern complex and popular medical destination. We’ve had a lot of interest, so now is the time to get in touch.”
Jonathan Hague, of Buildwell Developments, says the unique style of the complex was designed to be single-storey and intentionally low to retain unobstructed views of the Pegasus 24-hour surgery behind, and aid with accessibility in and out of the complex.
“Developed to 120 percent of the building code, the complex is of light weight construction and clad with white cedar. There is plentiful parking and a covered pedestrian walkway provides shelter between tenancies and access through to the surgery behind.”

Regenerate Christchurch

Thinking inside the square: Regenerate Christchurch

Regenerate Christchurch has released its vision for Cathedral Square, emphasising that a return to its original purpose as a gathering place for local people and visitors must be front and centre.

Regenerate Christchurch

Chief Executive Ivan Iafeta says while the vision for the physical regeneration of the Square is aspirational in terms of design, the social regeneration of the square is achievable sooner and should be prioritised.
The design for the square includes a series of interconnected spaces suitable for public events, with a combination of paving and green areas and more trees than in the past. There is an option for three enclosed pavilions connected by a lattice-style structure which Ivan says, would provide a year-round undercover area for markets and other activities.

Ivan says the greater regeneration will need to be delivered in stages as funding and other developments allow, but delivering a comprehensive programme of events, activities and festivals will re-establish the square as a gathering place.
“To be regenerated, the square cannot remain symbolic of the city’s loss and instead needs to be a strong symbol of the vibrant future of the centre of our city. The long-term vision will provide the impetus and drive for the public and private sectors to work toward a common goal.
“But it’s not just about new things. It is about people and we need to get on with making the square a place for the people again.”
Regenerate Christchurch’s long-term vision can be viewed at regeneratechristchurch.nz/cathedral-square and the organisation will now work with Christchurch City Council to develop a delivery strategy.

Lianne Dalzie

Investigating Infrastructural Investment: Mayor Lianne Dalziel’s recommendations

Mayor Lianne Dalziel is recommending Christchurch City Council puts extra money in its budget for improving the city’s core infrastructure.

Lianne Dalzie
Mayor Lianne Dalziel is recommending council puts extra money into improving core infrastructure

Council has met to begin finalising its Long Term Plan (LTP) – the document that maps out the council’s work programme and priorities for the next 10 years and how it proposes to fund the works.
More than 1500 groups and individuals made submissions on the draft LTP. In response to their feedback, the council is considering:

• Bringing forward $25 million in capital expenditure into the next three years to pay for work to ensure Christchurch’s drinking water is safe, secure and unchlorinated. The focus for the first year remains getting chlorine out of the drinking water

• Allocating an extra $16.8 million over the next three years for improving roads and footpaths, including intersections and school safety

• Approve spending an extra $48 million over the next three years on improving the performance of the city’s wastewater network.

“We heard very clearly from the community that people want roads and footpaths repaired faster, so we’ve made changes that allow us to repair those in the worst condition sooner,” Mayor Lianne Dalziel says.

 

Additional recommendations include:

• Bringing forward funding for the city’s planned new stadium by two years

• Providing a $30 million loan facility to support the building of more social housing in the city

• Supporting a range of initiatives in the community, for example Thompson Park, Linwood Pool, Edgeware Pool and additional opening hours for Matuku Takotako: Sumner Centre

• Continuing the Landmark Heritage Grant for three years

• Fast-tracking sections of the Quarryman’s Trail and Nor’West Arc cycleways, which will support a number of schools
• Extending the one-hour free parking offer in its central city car parking buildings until the end of January 2019

• Requesting the Development Forum develops a work programme to maintain momentum in the CBD, focusing on landbanking practices and incentives to develop inner-city residential properties

• Continuing free swims for green prescription holders and preschoolers at council pools during school hours.

To fund this work, it is proposed rates increase by an average of 5.5 percent in the coming financial year (plus $6.52 per property for the special heritage Cathedral grant). This is about $2.80 more a week for a home with the average RV of $500,000.

NZIA

Grandiose Identities: Canterbury Architecture

Like great homes, great cities too are works in progress; their forms nurtured over time, built upon by generations like layers of geological strata, which has resulted in an urban environment that is rich in character. It is after all, what made the post-Victorian city of Christchurch such a striking one.

NZIA
JUSTICE AND EMERGENCY PRECINCT, PHOTO DENNIS RADERMACHER

As the rebuilding city becomes a commercial playground for talented teams to create dynamic, contemporary designs, there are equally talented teams hard at work salvaging and strengthening what they can of our distinct built heritage.
While some exciting new commercial builds usher in a new era of construction in the city, they are rubbing architectural shoulders with some equally grandiose identities.
Both the old and the new have been recognised at this year’s NZIA Canterbury Architecture Awards, with large and complex public and commercial architectural projects, innovative buildings for learning and restored Christchurch landmarks among the winners.
In total, 34 awards were announced at the Awards 2018 event at Christchurch’s Cardboard Cathedral.

NZIA
JUSTICE AND EMERGENCY PRECINCT, PHOTO, DENNIS RADERMACHER

 

The jury convenor for this year’s Canterbury awards, Christchurch architect Melanda Slemint, praised the ability of architects to produce buildings of beauty, which function well and contribute positively to their wider environment.
“What really stood out is the way architects have been able to keep sight of the human scale, and the context within which the projects sit,” she says. “Christchurch is undergoing a period of identity change and some of the new projects speak eloquently about the quality of life we celebrate here.
“The world’s best cities have a fine-grained rhythm that creates interest and variation and prevents streets and public spaces from being overwhelming. As post-quake Christchurch continues to develop, it is heartening to see that the city’s architects are attuned to the needs of people.”
All Canterbury Architecture Award-winning projects are eligible for shortlisting in the New Zealand Architecture Awards. Those awards will be announced in November. For a full list of the winners visit
www.nzia.co.nz.

Harcourts Redwood

Apartments, Christchurch’s inner-city secret: Harcourts Redwood

Back before cell phones, social media, email, fax machines and talking over the fence to neighbours, the history of multi-level attached living within the inner city was the hip way of living without gardens and lawns, minimal maintenance and a strong sense of community belonging.

Harcourts Redwood
By Harcourts Gold Consultant Mark O’Loughlin

Today’s apartments are designed to meet stringent building codes around engineering standards, structural integrity, acoustics and insulation.
Ease of living, a ‘lock and leave’ mindset, plus the sense of safety and security of multiple residents in a complex are strong drawcards for city occupiers. In recent years there has been consistent growth in young KiwiSavers buying their first home, professional couples, single adults, semi-retired buyers and investors looking to buy completed or off the plans inner-city apartments or townhouses.
The recent completion of new apartment projects at 50 Kilmore, 194 Worcester and 282 Madras Streets replaced only 90 of the approximate 1200 inner-city multi-unit dwellings removed post-quake.

We have just launched a very cool boutique project ‘Identity’ at 135 Kilmore Street adjacent to the refurnished Town Hall and Victoria Square. The 15 apartments have been crafted by Stufkens Chambers Architects to be attractive to the mix of owner-occupiers, KiwiSavers, investors and retirees, priced from $450,000 each, built over five levels with good city views. An onsite display and model is open Sunday 1:45 to 2:15 to view or by appointment. Launched late June, there are four under option already.
Our inner city is a flourishing and exciting place to live. The simple lifestyle of apartment living was never a secret in the world, but in Christchurch the secret is out.

M2 Developments

Apartment collaboration: M2 Developments is in the business of giving homeowners back their homes

A multi-unit project in Edgeware came together seamlessly – thanks to thorough communication between the three insurance companies, PMO, the four homeowners and the main contractor.

M2 Developments

M2 Developments Limited won the competitive tender to rebuild 160 Geraldine Street, from the remedial groundwork to completion. “We provided a comprehensive breakdown of costs with no hidden surprises,” says owner Matt Anink, whose company has been prominent in the residential rebuild with its competent team of carpenters and labourers.
Commencing in November with TC3 ground remediation, the project required additional excavation work and the capping of an artesian well prior to the relevelable RibRaft foundations. “We absorbed this unanticipated extra work within the project programme to keep to our pre-Christmas target of a roof on for the holiday break.”
Cam Sheppard, M2’s project manager, was at the helm throughout. “He handled ongoing negotiations with everyone involved, from the council to insurance companies – he was great,” Matt says.
Three 90sqm units, separated by firewalls, are single level, with the fourth above the group’s garages. The original dwellings were similar to the Summerhill Stone units next door. Looking fresh and contemporary, the new units stand solid with James Hardie Linea weatherboard in silt-grey tones of Resene’s Half Delta and Alabaster trim.
“Owners were engaged throughout the project and could choose to upgrade and personalise their mid-range fit-outs,” Matt says. “Two opted for stainless steel kitchen benching. One chose a wallpaper feature wall, black door handles and tapware.”
Exposed-aggregate driveways and new fencing completed the project before the keys were handed over to very contented clients.
Visit www.m2developments.co.nz.

the Ministry of Awesome

An awesome enterprise: Q&A with the Ministry of Awesome’s Chief Awesome Officer Marian Johnson

A social enterprise established in the dark days post-quake to encourage positivity, collaboration, activation and support for a city that was struggling to survive, the Ministry of Awesome is a creative crew making some pretty cool moves.

the Ministry of Awesome

We talk to the organisation’s Chief Awesome Officer, Marian Johnson about the awesome work of this clever collaboration.

You’ve just celebrated six years in business, what is the organisation’s main role?

Ministry of Awesome is the starting point for entrepreneurs, innovators and startups. We deliver the essential ingredients necessary to ensure a thriving and dynamic entrepreneurial and innovation ecosystem.
We offer a Startup Activation Programme for any early stage entrepreneur or startup, which includes capability training, introductions to networks, and 100+ events every year that sustain our city’s influential and supportive innovation community. Last year, we saw more than 1,000 entrepreneurs come through our doors! We also operate AwesomeHQ – an inspiring co-working space at 192 St Asaph Street in the city centre.

How integral is it that we support entrepreneurs and start-ups here in Christchurch?

Entrepreneurs and innovators are key to Christchurch’s successful future as the ‘City of Opportunity’. And, for these change-makers, there is no better place to be than Christchurch whose ambition is to transform into a world leading city in its approach to sustainability, innovation and a collaborative economy.
By delivering the essential ingredients necessary for a flourishing startup and innovation ecosystem, we provide an environment that powers our fellow citizens forward to success. And, by creating this nurturing and dynamic environment, Christchurch will attract regional, national and international talent, all of whom will be part of this great future Christchurch – the City of Opportunity.

How did you first become involved?

I’d heard stories of Ministry of Awesome and had a vague understanding of the positive work it was doing but was light on detail until I was a founding member of Fluent Scientific, a tech startup from the Powerhouse Ventures stable. Ministry of Awesome played a crucial role in our early market validation process by opening up their powerful network, particularly in the area of tertiary education providers.
This early introduction allowed us to run successful pilot programmes that validated our product, customer and market. Without those initial introductions, it would have taken us 12 months or more to open those relationships and get traction. For a startup with a short runway, early and efficient market, customer and product validation are critical.
When the role of Chief Awesome Officer came up, I was already a convert of the organisation and could see the positive impact the organisation was having on the city’s nascent startup scene. I love Christchurch, I love our organisation’s mission, and I couldn’t be more grateful to our community, our supporters, and our trustees for allowing me to lead this mission.

What’s the most fulfilling aspect of what you do?

We are so lucky to see innovation first hand and to meet so many talented individuals every day. If the average citizen of Christchurch could see the innovation and sheer talent in our city, they would be equally inspired and so very excited to live here. We are telling these stories as loudly as we can alongside some incredible organisations like ChristchurchNZ, EPIC, Canterbury Tech, XCHC, The Chamber, Canterbury Angels, ARA, and UC’s Centre for Entrepreneurship.

Architect Craig South

A new approach to an old problem: architect Craig South explores innovative thinking about living in the CBD

Architect Craig South
Architect Craig South

Architect Craig South explores an alternative to the norm when it comes to central city living.

Architecture is typically viewed as a whole – the exterior lines, the internal layout and the fit-out. And while it is all of that, if we were to strip it back to a considered shell, we have what is known as Naked Architecture – a term being used overseas to describe buildings being designed and built with no preconceived ideas around their internal layout and use; buildings that the end-user is able to individually tailor to suit their needs.
This is not to say that the cornerstones of architecture are ignored. The roles of the developer and the architect are still vital throughout the process. Each unit or apartment needs to be the result of considered design; crafted for its individual location and placement within the overall structure in order for the building to be a success. The developer and architect are equally important during the fit-out stage, ensuring the end result is a well thought out, bespoke home.
By offering buyers this ability to buy ‘shell space’ and fit it out to suit their personal needs, we are creating end-user buy-in in terms of what they are wanting, giving buyers the opportunity to stake a claim and invest, beyond financially, into their purchase.
Where someone might spend more on floor tiles and fittings, another occupant will spend less. One may have an ‘entertainers’ kitchen and one large living area, while another will have multiple living spaces and sleeping options to suit their family – allowing everyone to create a home that falls within their budget while meeting their personal needs.

Architect Craig South

Having been seeking an inner city living option for my family, it has become apparent that finding the perfect solution is hard. Our decision to move into the inner city has been driven by the high level of amenity and the incredible opportunity Hagley Park offers as a borrowed landscape, ensuring that no matter where we move in this central neighbourhood and what size our floor plan, we have this vast green space on our doorstep. This ensures we won’t be compromising on the Kiwi backyard, rather opening up the opportunities that come with living within close proximity to such an under-utilised offering.
Personally, we would jump at the chance to convert a ‘shell’ into spaces that reflect our family’s needs both now and into the future. And what is exciting is that someone else could create something completely different in the adjacent space. This is a concept that allows for individualisation of style, budget and layout, creating a cross section and diversification of people living in our city.

Architect Craig SouthThis type of development is not an unknown concept in New Zealand, or even Christchurch. We commonly adopt it in the design and build of commercial buildings, so the question is, why not do it for personal living spaces?
We tend to look to Europe for passive design learnings and other design concepts, so why not look to them for inspiration to encourage families into our inner city?
With our central city neighbourhood bursting with amenities, yet slow to attract residential development post-earthquake, it is time to think beyond ordinary and offer a new and unique way to encourage people back.
www.caarc.co.nz

Regenerate Christchurch

City’s ‘living laboratory’: Christchurch is leading the way post-quake towards a cleaner and greener tomorrow

A green spine extending from the city to sea is poised to set Christchurch apart as a place that is prepared to explore new ways of living with nature – from adaptive housing to sustainable urban agriculture.

Walkways and biking tracks, wetland developments and a variety of other public and private land uses are included in a shortlist of potential options for an area of land known as the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor.
Formerly Christchurch’s ‘residential red zone’, the 11-kilometre stretch of land is nearly twice the size of New York’s Central Park and four times the size of London’s Hyde Park.
Regenerate Christchurch is responsible for developing the regeneration plan for the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor and says a mix of naturally-occurring and new activities has potential to attract up to a million unique visitors a year.
A “green spine” will extend along the river, up to 150 metres wide on each side, with large areas of ecological restoration, wetlands and community spaces. Elsewhere, there will be three significant areas suitable for a variety of potential public and private land uses reflecting themes of food and culture, experiencing nature and activity and play.
“These will create opportunities for school children and researchers to learn about the natural environment to better understand the challenges and opportunities within a truly living laboratory,” Regenerate Christchurch Chief Executive Ivan Iafeta says.
Regenerate Christchurch has developed a refined shortlist that will feature in an upcoming public exhibition. Ivan says implementation of the plan is likely to be the beginning of a 30-year intergenerational programme of work.

The former Christchurch Re:START Mall

Container mall’s new northern home: Re:START makes it’s way up the coast to quake stricken Kaikoura

Right from square one, the Re:START mall was an out of the box response to the urgent post-quake need for retail space in the city’s heart. And, although only ever intended as a temporary solution, the ‘container mall’ concept’s 2011 opening struck a local chord.

The former Christchurch Re:START Mall
The former Christchurch Re:START Mall

The brightly coloured containers quickly became an internationally-recognisable symbol of post-quake innovation before they were removed to make way for the Riverside Farmers’ Market due to open early next year.
Now upcycled shipping containers from the popular mall have found a new home in Kaikōura’s main street. Known as Uplift Kaikōura, the container mall’s northern incarnation is the brainchild of local business owners whose buildings were damaged in the Kaikōura quake in 2016.

UPLIFT
UPLIFT

The precinct opened at the end of last year on an empty site in the centre of town and is home to Gecko Gearz, Paper Plus and Ocean Arts, with a fourth business joining in soon.
Gecko Gearz owner Penny Betts says Uplift stands on the site where the grand Adelphi Hotel stood for 96 years before being demolished after the 2016 quake.
“We are so fortunate to have these containers in Kaikōura,” Penny says.
“A good mix of travellers are shopping at the site and we’ve had very positive feedback and support from locals and Kiwis travelling through.”
Much like its former incarnation, feedback has been extremely positive. “People are constantly telling me it has given the town life, a really good vibe and shows we are moving forward and staying positive albeit challenging times,” she says.
“There’s a lovely green area in the centre, which has some picnic tables and a giant Connect Four game. It is great to see people relaxing in the area and quite a few of the local teens come and play the Connect Four.”
Uplift was predominantly privately-funded with some public donations from a Givealittle fundraising page.
Meanwhile in Christchurch, the Riverside Farmers’ Market is expected to be made up of five low-rise buildings with more than 80 market stalls, with 10,000 square metres of floor space and balconies overlooking three new laneways.
Inspired by European markets in cities like Copenhagen, the $80 million plan headed by developer Richard Peebles includes restaurants, food stalls and shops, fashion stores and offices, and is expected to be a breakthrough for the western end of Christchurch’s retail precinct.
“Farmers’ markets are the heart and soul of a city,” Peebles said when he unveiled plans for the development. “It’s where people naturally congregate and come together as a community.”
Building commenced earlier this year, with the complex earmarked for completion by 1 November 2018. The quick build time aims to minimise disruption for central city retailers.