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Cindy-Lee Sinclair

Marketing your property: Cindy-Lee Sinclair of Harcourts Holmwood on what to think about when selling your home or investment

Long established as a top-flight professional real estate agent in Christchurch, Cindy-Lee Sinclair of Harcourts Holmwood Real Estate Merivale says there are several things to know when putting property on the market. An absolutely key element is to ensure an agent has a signed listing authority before they bring buyers through, Cindy says.

Cindy-Lee Sinclair

Your agent should provide you with a written market appraisal to help you set your expectations about price range for the property. The agent should also discuss with you all the different ways you can sell the property and help you settle on the method that best suits. The agent should also talk through the marketing options and help you choose a programme that meets your needs and the method of sale chosen.
Cindy says you also need to understand how and when the agent will be paid, and how the commission on the completed sale will be calculated. Other costs to consider include marketing and the auctioneers fee, if you choose to sell via auction.
Cindy recommends everyone planning to sell their home read the ‘New Zealand Residential Property Agency Agreement Guide’ prepared by The Real Estate Agents Authority. It sets out in some detail the information you need and the decisions you will have to make and you can clarify any information in there with Cindy or your agent.
Cindy can be contacted at
cindy.sinclair@harcourts.co.nz
or at 0274 888 616.

Lionel Richie

Lionel Richie: A living legend

Last month, Christchurch was witness to one of the best musicians of the 1980s. The legend himself, Lionel Richie.

Lionel Richie
MATT HENRY PHOTOGRAPHY + AMBIENT LIGHT

Songwriter, actor, singer and record producer, he has been gracing our televisions of late with his role as an American Idol judge. With such hits as Endless Love, All Night Long, Stuck on You, Say You Say Me and, of course, the heart-wrenching Hello, the hits from his years with the Commodores and many, many more, his ability to bring a stand up and dance moment at his concerts is never in question.
I was fortunate enough to catch up with him the night before the concert for a chat. “It’s Lionel Richie!” I said as I approached.
“Have been all my life,” he said in the beautiful gravelly voice of a seasoned pro.

How do you find New Zealand audiences?
“It’s a great country and I always enjoy coming here. You are all so friendly!”

It’s such a privilege to meet you, I grew up with your music in the 1980s and Hello is such a beautiful song
“You know what? I grew up with that music too! When I first started, people would say ‘what a sexy man’. When I got into my late 20s early 30s, people would say, ‘what a handsome man’. Now all I get is… ‘You look good for your age!’
“I was out in a bar in New Orleans and I saw this attractive woman looking across at me and I started looking at her, she looked at me and I was giving her ‘the look’ when she came over to me and said in this French accent ‘Yoouu are Lion-Nell Reechiiee?’ And I said ‘Yeeeesss, I am Lion-Nell Reechiiee’.
“She then handed me her mobile and said, ‘I’m friends with your daughter Nicole, she wants to say hi’. That’s when I got an earful from my daughter about hitting on her friends. I’m OLD now!”

How do you find the audiences respond to your music these days?
“Nothing’s changed except for the fact when I started off everyone said that if I kissed a girl at the front of the stage, the audience would go nuts – so I started doing that. Obviously now it’s a lot harder to lean that far down, so I don’t do that anymore. I’m OLD. I’m really looking forward to the Christchurch audience. You’re going to have a fun time tomorrow night.”

And he was so, so right. Those fortunate enough to be at Horncastle Arena were subjected to hit after boogie-down hit. The energy that this 68-year-old can conjure up on stage would make any teenage musician envious. Reminding us just how prolific and how relevant he was during the decade of music that was the 80s, back when he had us all singing We are the World, which he co-wrote with Michael Jackson. Music royalty was visiting Christchurch.
“As always, Lionel put on an amazing show, we love hosting him at Horncastle Arena,” Turlough Carolan from Vbase says.
“It’s also great to see such a varied range of events visiting the city over the coming months, from the incredible Dynamo (20-21 July) to the sublime Queens of the Stone Age (25 August), yet again, Vbase will be bringing many more great acts to Christchurch.”
Marvellous to have caught up with a living legend here, such a down to earth man with a beautiful voice for singing and conversation. A moment all those who saw him in concert will remember for a long time. He had us all, Dancing on the Ceiling.

Karen Walker

Striking sartorial gold: Q&A with Karen Walker

Every industry has one; the prodigious talents whose comfort zones are outside of the box and for whom rules are more guideline than instruction. They’re the rebels, the misfits, the rulebreakers and the nonconformists. But equally, they’re the trendsetters, the innovators, the visionaries and the true talent. For New Zealand fashion, that’s Karen Walker.

Karen Walker

In 1989, at 19 years of age with just $100 in her pocket and two shirts in her commercial repertoire, she launched the Karen Walker label. Since then, she has steadily grown to be New Zealand’s most famous fashion export, with more than 1020 stores globally stocking her fashion, eyewear, jewellery, fragrance and paint collections, and a cult following from Lady Gaga to Madonna.
With the ability to pair neons with pastels and floral prints with military touches in a way that only a true talent can, she has struck sartorial gold with her androgynous and offbeat designs distinguishable by their punchy, tomboyish edge.
Metropol caught up with the sartorial powerhouse after a whirlwind trip to Dunedin where she was judging this year’s iD Fashion Week.

What was a standout at this year’s iD Fashion Week?
The stand-out for me, obviously, was our first prize winner, Damir Begović, but there were a lot of other collections that I thought were really excellent – I was very impressed and delighted to be there.

How important is it to you to support emerging designers coming through the industry?
I think it’s very important for anyone who’s well established in this industry to support emerging talent and iD Fashion Week’s got a great structure in place for doing this in a unique and outward-facing way.

Karen Walker has become an iconic Kiwi label, why do you think it has been such a success and how do you continue to stay ahead of the game in such a constantly evolving industry?
It all comes down to the ideas and we’re very fortunate that people like what we make. With regard to staying ahead of the game, I guess that’s just a result of us being interested in new ideas.

What drew you to fashion in the first place?
The feeling it gives you when you create or find something truly new/exciting/great.

How would you define the Karen Walker brand?
Chic meets eccentric.

You’ve been involved with some pretty cool collaborations recently, including cookie mix and cute canine accessories. How much fun has it been to do something completely different?
We’re in this business because we love to work with and create new ideas, especially ones that put a smile on people’s faces, and we’re always thinking about and working on projects that are new and exciting.

We have to ask the cliché question – what are your biggest style secrets?
A combination of lots of things really but the things that are important to me include: quality, a sense of self and a calmness within that, plenty of sleep and, for me personally, if in doubt… navy. And never, ever, ever counterfeits.

What can we look forward to from Karen Walker this coming year?
Coming up in the second half of the year we’ve got new eyewear (guys and girls), new ready-to-wear and bags and a big, exciting, top secret collab to top the year off.

Benny Castles

King of his Castle: a fashionable Q&A with WORLD Director Benny Castles

He started as a retail assistant, but Benny Castles has worked his way up to the upper echelons of fashion royalty, making his name as the king of colour, with a personal style that is as vibrant and worldly as the brand which he is now a director of.

Benny Castles

Fresh from a whirlwind trip to Dunedin to judge the iD Dunedin Fashion Week for 2018 alongside Karen Walker and Maggie Hewitt, Metropol talks to WORLD Director Benny about how he defines style and pushes the envelope.

You first started at World as a part time retail assistant, what attracted you to the industry?

A job… a welcome alternative to schooling. Little did I know… I had always been interested in fashion and shopping, so it seemed a natural place for me to spend my time – around a host of uniquely interesting people and within an enviroment and business that offered such enticing ideas.

How do you define style?

I do not even try, except to say that it is not an entirely visual pursuit. Style and fashion add to one’s sense of self and, if done correctly, they can express your personality and character in a way that makes you feel the best possible version of yourself.

What is the best part about what you do?

The people. World is a personality brand, it was founded by characters and individuals and this continues through its staff and clients who are all interlinked, even though they are all so different, by a string of personality that makes the brand so much richer. We have a team of eclectic and distinctive individuals and the same can be said of our customers.

World has become an iconic Kiwi label, why do you think it has been such a success and how do you continue to stay ahead of the game in such a constantly evolving industry?

Francis Hooper and Dame Denise L’Estrange-Corbet who founded World are mavericks, their boundless energy to push the envelope and evolve alongside their self created rules are what has continually made World a brand people can connect themselves to. We care little for what others are doing or what the game currently is, we do what pleases World and hope that our customers will enjoy our independent vision.

What was a standout at this year’s iD Fashion Week?

Inspiration – fashion at its most innovative, emerging and creative should move you. The freedom of emerging designers should elicit a joy in their work and I was pleased to see this spark in the work of what are some very talented designers.

What are some of the things we can look forward to from World this coming year?

Our new World Christchurch store will continue to evolve as we grow our collections of beauty brands and the seasons change. We are continuing to work with a host of artists and creatives on making sure the concept window on High Street and the store itself are ever changing environments.

The Russley Village

Luxury living: setting a high standard at The Russley Village

“The opportunities for luxury living continue to grow at The Russley Village, with foundations about to be poured for The Ashley Suites,” says Village Manager Wayne Thompson.

The Russley Village

The Ashley Suites will host resthome and hospital level care and the top floor will contain eight serviced apartments, enabling residents to receive resthome level care in their home if required.
Completed only last December, the Sefton Apartment complex is almost fully occupied with one bed apartments still available. The Sefton Block is home to the glorious 15m x 9m swimming pool and spa pool.

The Russley Village The residents of the existing country estate style 47 villas and 63 spacious apartments (one, two and three bedrooms), have a short stroll to the fully licensed Abode Café and Brasserie, the boutique cinema and the Pavilion which contains cardio room, group exercise space for indoor bowls, low impact exercise classes and dancing. The bowling green is soon to be upgraded which will allow its use for croquet – hoops will be able to be inserted into the green!
“The Russley Village sets a new standard for retirement villages – in terms of physical design, architectural individuality, social variety and quality of care,” Wayne says. “Demand is high, which means people need to plan ahead if they would like to join our warm and inclusive community. So book a visit, finishing with coffee in the café then a stroll around our award-winning gardens.”

Lorraine Downes

Lorraine Downes: Healing Heartbreak

From her Miss Universe fairytale to the tragic death of her soulmate, cricketing legend Martin Crowe, Lorraine Downes knows better than most the highs and lows life can throw at you, but she found solace in writing.

Lorraine Downes
Photo: Monty Adams

Published by Allen and Unwin, Life, Loss, Love is the first time she has commented publicly on her relationship with Martin since his death in 2016. She talks to Metropol about heartbreak and the decision to put pen to paper.
Lorraine was just 19 when she became a national superstar, winning the Miss Universe crown in 1983. She married Martin in 2009 and, when he was diagnosed with lymphoma, she became his primary caregiver, waging the four-year battle by his side. “We had a relationship which was on a very deep spiritual level which came from a heartfelt and soulful connection,” Lorraine says of their bond.
“We were our closest allies and always wanted the absolute best for one another. At the end of our time together on this earth, we could not have been any closer. Marty’s comment to me on our last wedding anniversary together on Feb 14, 2016, ‘we have gone from not being able to keep our hands off each other, to not being able to keep our eyes off each other’.”
Heartbroken after his death in March 2016, Lorraine felt like she had no idea who she was or what she wanted to do. “My heart was broken. I took a year off work as I needed to allow myself time to deal with my grief.”
Gradually she began the healing process, spending time alone in Bali, studying Argentinean Tango in Buenos Aires, taking precious time out with her children and, of course, focused on writing her book.
“During Marty’s illness I was writing as we were experiencing and learning so much. After he passed, I continued to write. I just knew intuitively one day I would write my memoir as I had so much to share with the intention to help others through their challenging times.

Lorraine Downes
Photo: Monty Adams

“Writing my memoir was so healing. I think everyone should write their own memoir even if you don’t publish, as it is a very cathartic experience.”
So what’s her biggest piece of advice on grief and healing? “Your grief represents your love, so the greater the grief, the greater the love. It is your grief, so process your grief in your own way, do not do anything you don’t want to do just because you are being told to do it by well-meaning people.
“Keep moving even when you feel you can’t, even if it is for a walk on a beach, in the bush, get out in the sun as nature is a great healer. Know that you will find joy again, one day, when you have processed and healed your broken heart.”

Mix & Mingle

Mix & mingle: five activities that are perfect for those who don’t want a night on the town

Let’s face it, bar hopping and dance parties are so last year. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t still some wonderful opportunities to mix and mingle, and kick up your heels in a much more creative sense of the expression.

Mix & Mingle

We’ve collated a collection of some of the city’s more subdued selections when it comes to getting out and about; somewhere you can comfortably take the grandkids out to or head out for some R&R.

Magnificent music

Get back into the heart of the city at St Mary’s Pro-Cathedral, which offers a regular concert series on Wednesdays, beginning at 1:10pm with optional light lunch available at the Cathedral Café from 12:45pm.

St Mary’s Pro-Cathedral
373 Manchester Street
Every Wednesday, beginning at 1:10pm
Donation $10 & $5, proceeds to the CBS Building Fund

Denim, Diamonds and Dancing

Cholmondeley Children’s Centre is proud to announce its first annual fundraising evening of Denim, Diamonds and Dancing in support of The Little Gems Project. The evening will be presented by television host, Jason Gunn and includes live music, top-class entertainment, delicious canapés, dancing and a live auction.

Sixty6 on Peterborough
Saturday 26 May from 7:30pm
Tickets from $138 available online at
www.littlegems.org.nz

Christchurch chorals

Atlas Voices was established in 2013 and continues to push the boundaries and expectations of choral music by presenting a variety of styles at an exceptional standard under the expert leadership of American conductor, Ravil Atlas. Momentum will showcase the group’s broad range, technical vocal capabilities and superb musicality.

Knox Church
Sunday 27 May, 2:30pm
Tickets $30, available from ww.atlasvoices.nz

Tea-totaller

Why not try something completely unique and experience a traditional Chinese tea making process, while learning the tea culture, history and health benefits of fine tea? Taste the traditional Chinese tea dessert and get a guided tour of Wood Firing Ceramics Exhibition.

Fo Guang Yuan Art Gallery,
2 Harakeke St, Riccarton
Two sessions per day on Sundays
Price $18 per person, bookings
eventfinda.co.nz or 03-341 6276

Four-legged & furry friends

A family exhibition of the best products, services, and entertainment for all those who love pets and animals returns to Christchurch and is growing on its successful inaugural show! The Pet & Animal Expo is a celebration of pets and animals and the positive role they play in society.

Pioneer Leisure Centre,
75 Lyttelton Street, Somerfield
Saturday and Sunday 28-29 April 10am-4pm
Tickets from $4 available from
eventfinda.co.nz or 0800 BUY TIX (289 849)

Molls Dolls

The dames of dance: how the award winning dance group ‘Molls Dolls’ got their collective groove on

Molly Chapman was four years old when she donned her first pair of tap shoes and clicked her way across the floorboards. Born and raised in Dunedin, Molly grew up in a family that was, and still is, very involved in musical theatre. “My sister plays leading roles and directs musicals in Dunedin, and my brother acts and directs too.”

Molls Dolls

Molly taught tap in Dunedin and continued to teach it when she moved to Christchurch, aged 22. Her love of dance was passed onto her son, Hayden Withers, who graduated from the American Musical and Dramatic Academy (AMDA) in 2014, and is now New York based, and wowing audiences at Off Broadway. “Hayden’s my
inspiration,” Molly says.
The birth of Molls Dolls came about when the mother of a young girl she taught suggested Molly take a class for adults, as well as preschoolers. The same mother also suggested the name Molls Dolls.
It was while attending a Masters Games event with a softball team, which Molly says was enormous fun, that she became aware that the Masters had a Dancesports category.
She returned home with a plan in mind and wasted no time in putting out the word she was looking to teach tap to adult women. She set up a dance studio in her home and in 2015, Molls Dolls were up and tapping.
In 2016 they competed in their first Masters Games in Dunedin. “Our team comprised six ex-tap dancers. We were in the Formation Team section of the Dancesports and the crowds loved us so much that we returned home wearing silver medals!”
Fired with such a win, Molls Dolls headed to the Masters at Wanganui in January 2017. “But this time there were 11 of us (three teams) and we came away with Gold and Silver.”
On Waitangi weekend of this year, Molls Dolls competed at the Masters, again; by now the three teams had grown to 21 dancers, aged from 37 to 69. They made a clean sweep, with the red and silver team winning the gold medal, the blue team taking out the silver, and the black and gold team getting bronze. They also got the silver medal in Show Dance.
The girls are super industrious when it comes to fundraising. “From May to August we make up to 300 dozen cheese rolls, per run – we’ve even made over 1,200 dozen!”
Next up for these indefatigable dames of dance is the Masters Games in October at Timaru and Wanganui in February, 2019. “We’ve also been invited to an Australasian Competition called Follow Your Dreams, with a qualifying competition in Christchurch in August. If we qualify then we’ll be heading to Melbourne in January 2019.”
Molly says her dancers inspire her and have brought so much fun into her life. “The girls give me so much joy. I don’t think I would have survived the hard times without them; they make Molls Dolls!”
For more information, email molz@xtra.co.nz.

St Andrew's College

Empowering education: St Andrews College is giving kids the tools they need to be happy successful adults

Against a backdrop of delightful bubbles an amazing new asset made its mark at St Andrew’s College in February.

St Andrew's College

While the youngest members of the St Andrew’s delighted in a mass bubble blowing activity, Dame Adrienne Stewart opened their state-of-the-art buildings and bespoke playgrounds, all part of the brand new Stewart Junior Centre. The beautiful contrast between fun and formality set the tone for what the new facility will provide – an environment to excel, learn and thrive while having a great time each and every day.
The new development offers three new junior classrooms in one block for Year 1-3 students with an adjacent new preschool and an impressive outdoor facility that ensures education beyond the four walls of classroom is just as enriching.
All rooms in the Junior School enjoy high spec engineering, construction, insulation, technology and contemporary furniture and equipment. A Discovery Room provides an incredible avenue for diverse learning including art and cooking.
The Stewart family made a significant contribution to the Stewart Junior Centre, designed by Wilkie and Bruce Architects, and built by Armitage Williams. Mark Stewart took a walk down memory lane in his speech saying it was almost exactly 50 years since he started at St Andrew’s as a five-year-old. He said his family was proud of its long association with the college and their support of various projects. His brother Todd and other family members were also in attendance.
Preparatory School Principal, Jonathan Bierwirth says, “There is a natural cohesion and close connection between the Junior School and Pre-school, which is significantly enhanced by having both within the new Stewart Junior Centre. It is wonderful to have the youngest members of the St Andrew’s family learning in such close proximity.”

Bryce Gallery: Min Kim Kingfisher

Great galleries: Four Christchurch art galleries you have to check out

Ladies and gentlemen, forget Paris, London and New York. The best in art is right here in Ōtautahi, Christchurch. For your viewing pleasure, we’ve gone in search of some of the latest and greatest. When it comes to art, these four favourites are exhibitionists in all the right ways.

Bryce Gallery: Min Kim Kingfisher
Bryce Gallery: Min Kim Kingfisher
  1. ART METRO: With more than 400 students attending classes weekly, this art school is ace! There’s an ABC for beginners and for the advanced student, classes in freehand drawing, sketching, pastels and water colour; there are classes in oils, acrylics and pastel techniques and, for those into self-expression, classes in abstract art.
    Children are offered after school painting, drawing and cartoon classes and the holiday programme is very popular. Do browse their gallery and chat to the artists at work.
  2. BRYCE GALLERY: Their first 2018 exhibition is ‘Nature Speak’, a celebration of our native flora and fauna from artists J. Stewart, Min Kim and Galina Kim.
    J. Stewart’s landscapes are mighty, magnificent works that draw the eye and hold your attention, while his C.F. Goldie inspired portraits are flawlessly executed. The subjects look into your very soul; their eyes speak of their stories, their history.
    Min Kim’s native tree and birdlife works are exquisite in detail and rendering. Min’s Kowhai, for example, is of the brightest, fieriest autumnal hues, while her New Zealand Falcon pays full tribute to these noble birds of prey.
    Galina Kim brings the flora component to the exhibition with flowers that you wish to reach out and touch. Her wildflowers are an untamed delight, while her peonies are delicate, yet flaunting and voluptuous. Planned since December 2017, ‘Nature Speak’ was definitely worth the wait!
    Nature Speak – 15 March to 10 April
  3. FO GUANG YUANG GALLERY: Taiwanese artisan Huang Da An is currently on exhibition until April 8, 2018. Huang is a self-taught artist who has recreated the traditional wood-firing ceramic art through a decade-long of experimentation. His ceramics speak for themselves; each piece is a joy – a wonder of texture and colour. Not to be missed!
    Auckland artist Dean Buchanan’s works will be on display from April to mid-July. His oils, typically large in size, are colourful, vivid and dramatic, reflecting Dean’s passion and connection to his homeland. Rumour has it that if you’re looking for the painting to grace your home, it should be a Dean Buchanan.
  4. CoCA TOI MOROKI: Peter Robinson’s solo exhibition Fieldwork in which delicate, sculptural forms (comprising wood, wire, paper, metals, magnets and nails) sprawl through CoCA’s galleries.
    The intricate scale of the materials also highlights the nature of CoCA’s ‘Christchurch Style’ Brutalist Architecture. The exhibition coincides with the building’s 50th anniversary this year. CoCA was designed by Minson, Henning Hansen and Dines and was purpose built in 1968.
    Fieldwork runs 3 March to 13 May.