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Ivan Iafeta

The Influencers: Ivan Iafeta


Like the Arts Centre, the Christchurch Town Hall holds many special memories for people and its re-opening is a significant milestone in the city’s recovery.

 

Ivan Iafeta
Regenerate Christchurch CEO

Completion of the new Spark building, the Aotea Gifts building and Convention Centre are further milestones on the horizon. The activity at the Town Hall from now on will be a significant new element of the city’s regeneration. In just the next couple of months some of the performers taking to the stage include Shapeshifter and the CSO, Marlon Williams, organist Martin Setchell, The Broods, Charley Pride, Norah Jones and The Proclaimers.

Each of these varied performances, and the rest, will bring people into the central city – many of whom will start their evening at one of the inner-city bars and restaurants, or head there afterwards. But it is perhaps later in the year, when the Christchurch Schools’ Music festival returns to the Town Hall, that sentimental thoughts will be their strongest.

The festival, which is in its 80th year, was held at the Town Hall from the early 1970s until 2010. In early November, across three nights, more than 4,000 young singers from more than 100 schools will come together. Anyone who has had an involvement with the festival in some shape or form over the years will appreciate the significance of its return to Kilmore Street.

The Town Hall’s re-opening, like all milestones, is to be celebrated and, on behalf of the Regenerate Christchurch team, I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate everyone who has been involved.

 



 

Ivan Iafeta

Ivan Iafeta: The Influencers


If you visited somewhere outside Christchurch during the holiday period and found several tower cranes and a number of mobile cranes operating in close proximity, it is likely that you considered it to be an area where there was a lot of investment and development happening.

 

Ivan Iafeta
Regenerate Christchurch CEO

 

It is also likely that people from outside Christchurch who visited our city and saw just that, had a similar impression – the impact of which cannot be underestimated.

Dynamic cities attract highly skilled people whose efforts have a ripple effect, creating new jobs and driving economic development. Christchurch is well-positioned to accommodate stronger growth and must compete harder to attract a greater share.

This year, Regenerate Christchurch is focussed on identifying and addressing impediments to regeneration in the short, medium and long term.

This will build on our central city momentum work, which has already led to the development and implementation of the central city revitalisation action plan by both the public and private sectors.

All cities have a constant need to regenerate in some shape or form.

The fact that Christchurch’s regeneration phase follows a period of recovery means an ongoing long-term commitment will be essential. Progress can sometimes be obscured from view by familiarity and it is critical that we, as a community, acknowledge and celebrate it. However, there is still plenty to be done.

 



 

Ivan Iafeta

Ivan Iafeta: The Influencers


Ivan Iafeta
Ivan Iafeta: Regenerate Christchurch CEO

Since 2011, plenty has been said about the opportunity Christchurch has to redefine itself. But, as in most cities, conversations about vision can sometimes be overtaken by more vocal demands for immediate action and visible progress. As we near the end of 2018, a year in which there have been significant visible signs of progress, the focus must continue to shift from recovery to the longer-term, ongoing and more complex process of regeneration.

While individual agencies deliver value through their individual work programmes, it is the outcomes from the collective regeneration initiatives of the wider public and private sectors that generate the most value. Two examples this year have been the completion and opening of Tūranga, the new central library, and the EntX cinema complex. In just a few months’ time, the Christchurch Town Hall will re-open and, this time next year, the opening of Te Pae (the new convention centre) will be months away.

But it is also important to remember that regeneration is not about new buildings and facilities. Attracting more people to Christchurch as visitors and new residents must be one of the city’s core objectives. Unlike Auckland and Wellington, Christchurch has the capacity to grow without the space and infrastructure constraints the northern cities are currently grappling with.

However, it will not be a case of ‘build it and they will come’. Christchurch must demonstrate how it is uniquely placed to support the country’s growth and its relevance to New Zealand’s future success. That will be a task for all of us in 2019.

 



 

Ivan Iafeta

Ivan Iafeta: The Influencers


A significant milestone in planning the future of the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor has been reached, with public notification of the Draft Regeneration Plan which provides guidance on future development of the area.

Ivan Iafeta
Regenerate Christchurch CEO

The draft plan, and details of where hard copies can be seen, are on our website. The deadline for written comments is 5pm on Wednesday 19 December. Another regeneration advancement in recent weeks has been the Christchurch City Council’s development of its Central City Action Plan, which builds on Regenerate Christchurch’s earlier assessment and advice on increasing regeneration momentum in the central city.

The Council’s action plan acknowledges the influence cohesive leadership will have on its success and reflects Regenerate Christchurch’s call to action, particularly for the public sector, to ensure regeneration decisions are made on a “best-for-city” basis.
This will not necessarily come easy – largely due to the fact that there is not necessarily a shared understanding of what “best-for-city” actually means. Nevertheless, it will not be optional and a genuine commitment will be required.

There are always competing demands. Never more so than in a city setting itself up for future success in what could still be described as a challenging environment. Addressing these demands in a manner that considers what will deliver the most benefit to as much of the community as possible, is my idea of a “best-for-city” approach. What’s yours?

 



 

Ivan Iafeta

The Influencers: Ivan Iafeta


On a wet Friday in mid-October, a significant milestone in the regeneration of Cathedral Square was reached. The doors to Tūranga – the new central library – were opened to the public.

 

Ivan Iafeta
Regenerate Christchurch CEO

At nearly 10,000 square metres, it is the largest public library in the South Island. But its significance for the local community amounts to more than just floorspace. The city has not had a central library since 2011. In that time, technologies have continued to advance and the modern library environment is very different from what it was in the past, where people of all ages were required to be seen and not heard.

One thing that has not changed, however, is the role of libraries – particularly central libraries – in a community. At a library, we all have the same level of access to information. At a library, everyone is equal. The value of that equity cannot be underestimated. Nor can the impact Tūranga will have on the vibrancy of Christchurch’s central city, particularly Cathedral Square.

This milestone in the city’s regeneration includes the significant philanthropic support for Tūranga. Through the recently-established Christchurch Foundation, $2.5 million has been gifted by TSB, Spark and Southbase to support the library’s operational overheads.

The momentum being created by the combination of philanthropic support, private sector investment and public sector commitment will ensure the Square becomes an example-of-progress as much as a work-in-progress. It also demonstrates how all sectors working together on a best-for-city approach could work outside Cathedral Square.

 



 

Ivan Iafeta

The Influencers Column: Ivan Iafeta


The Christchurch City Council recently announced the development of an action plan to increase the pace of regeneration in Christchurch’s city centre.

 

Ivan Iafeta
Regenerate Christchurch CEO

 

The stimulus was an assessment by Regenerate Christchurch of progress in the central city and five key recommendations regarding leadership, growth, people, activation and implementation. The council’s action plan was also informed by ChristchurchNZ’s most recent economic update.

Significant progress has been made in rebuilding the central city – largely driven by private sector investment and development. What is clear in the report on our analysis, which is available on our website, is that further increasing central city regeneration will require a range of measures.
As construction-led activity begins to tail off, without more workers, residents, shoppers and visitors in the central city, Christchurch will be economically vulnerable. So, what can we, as a city, do?

The council’s action plan is being designed to align activity planned by public sector agencies with private sector-led activities. We also need to collectively, as a city, focus on making ‘best for city’ decisions and compete harder to attract people here.

The city has an opportunity to absorb growth in a way that no other major city in New Zealand can. We can also offer facilities, infrastructure and lifestyle that other cities cannot.
Having the space to support the growth of New Zealand’s businesses and the national economy, is a very powerful value proposition for Christchurch, one that we must collectively pursue and promote on behalf of our city.

 



 

Ivan Iafeta

Ivan Iafeta: The Influencers


When we released our vision for Cathedral Square two months ago, we highlighted the significant investment already being made in the area by the private and public sectors.

Ivan Iafeta
Regenerate Christchurch CEO

 

Since then, that investment has become even more evident.
Nexus Point’s Spark building on the south side of the Square is now out of the ground and the adjacent site of Redson Corporation’s new Aotea Gifts building is being prepared. On the north side of the Square, the Convention Centre is really starting to take shape and the new central library (Tūranga) is due to open in October. There is also site maintenance underway around the Anglican Cathedral.

Another development since we released our vision has been the announcement that Justin Murray is the independent Chair of the joint venture company that will oversee the reinstatement of the Cathedral. We said in June that, coupled with the Cathedral’s reinstatement, the regeneration of the square would need to be delivered in stages as funding and other developments allow; but returning it to its original purpose as a gathering place for local people and visitors must be front and centre.

ChristchurchNZ’s Explore Christchurch campaign to help stimulate economic activity in the central business district during the winter months, which is traditionally a quieter time for the city, is an excellent example of how we can make that happen – and not just in Cathedral Square. It also highlights that there is a role for all of us to play in the regeneration of our city.

 



 

Ivan Iafeta

The Influencers Column: Ivan Iafeta

There can be no doubt that the rest of New Zealand has learnt much from the experiences of communities in the South Island during the past seven years.

Ivan Iafeta
Ivan Iafeta: Regenerate Christchurch CEO

Until now, this has largely been related to seismic activity. But a significant climate change-related project in the Southshore and South New Brighton area is also likely to attract national interest.

The potential impact of climate change is a significant concern for coastal communities and it is important they have the opportunity to contribute to and influence their community’s response.
That is why we are utilising local expertise, knowledge and networks to develop a regeneration strategy for Southshore and South New Brighton that will identify and evaluate short, medium and long-term options for adapting to the effects of climate change, and consider the future use of red zone land in the area.

Our engagement with the Southshore and South New Brighton communities – in partnership with the Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury and Ngāi Tahu – is based on a plan developed by community members and agency staff. It prioritises face-to-face communication, which is why we have opened a community engagement hub at 82 Estuary Road where people can find out what’s going on and how they can be involved.

Find out more at coastalfutures.nz

The climate change element of the regeneration strategy work is particularly complex and the conversation about possible options for adaptation will have implications beyond these areas. Coastal communities around the country will be watching with interest.

Ivan Iafeta

The Influencers Column: Ivan Iafeta

After five weeks, our Red Zone Futures exhibition has ended and we are now assessing the feedback provided by everyone who visited the Cashel Mall site, engaged with our travelling exhibition and commented via the online exhibition.

Ivan Iafeta
Regenerate Christchurch CEO

 

This information, as well as the findings of qualitative research carried out during the exhibition period, will inform our development of the draft Regeneration Plan for the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor.
As the exhibition entered its final weeks, another of our projects reached a significant milestone. The release of our vision for Cathedral Square followed 18 months of design work, technical reports and engagement with Cathedral Square property owners, business groups, heritage groups, Ngāi Tūāhuriri, the public and other key stakeholders.
We have appreciated the significant interest in our thinking for the square. But it’s not just about new things. To be regenerated, the square must return to its original purpose as a gathering place for local people and visitors. It needs to be a strong symbol of the vibrant future of the city centre.
The vision, which will be delivered in stages as funding and other developments allow, is aspirational in terms of design. But we believe the social regeneration of the square is achievable sooner rather than later and should be prioritised by tidying the place up and making it a place for the people again.
With that in mind, we will work with the city council on the development of a delivery strategy to support the private and public investment being made in the area.

Ivan Iafeta

The Influencers Column: Ivan Iafeta

Ivan Iafeta
Ivan Iafeta: Regenerate Christchurch CEO

For the past 14 months, identifying and assessing potential land uses in the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor has been a significant part of Regenerate Christchurch’s work to develop a regeneration plan for the area.
The transformational opportunity it represents, as well as the local and national benefits, cannot be underestimated and it has been critical that we ensure our decision-making is informed, consistent and accountable.
While an independent community needs survey, carried out by Nielsen, identified a strong community interest in the corridor’s water quality, research findings on their own do not provide a comprehensive mechanism for testing all ideas.
Therefore, at Regenerate Christchurch, our assessment of potential land use combinations has included considering how these options might support safe, strong, healthy and connected communities, provide increased recreation and leisure activities, restore native habitat, create sustainable economic activity, attract visitors, provide opportunities to learn from the natural environment and address the challenges of climate change.
We have also assessed the potential land use combinations for their feasibility and how they might provide low and no-cost activities for all ages and abilities, and improve connections between central and east Christchurch.
The Red Zone Futures exhibition, which will run for five weeks from 26 May at 99 Cashel Mall – with parallel mobile and online exhibitions – will demonstrate the transformational opportunities within the river corridor. Opportunities that will deliver significant benefits for us here in Christchurch, as well as people around New Zealand and around the world.