metropol » old » Editor's Perspective

Tag: Editor’s Perspective

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: on being a mum and Mother’s Day

“Children are not a distraction from the most important work, they are the most important work,” CS Lewis.

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

There’s unpaid overtime – with back to back early and late shifts a given – unexpected expenses come with no reimbursement, public holidays aren’t recognised and, for that matter, neither are weekends. There’s no performance reviews, no opportunity for a payrise – in fact, there’s no pay at all.
Chances are, if it was employment, you would have called in the mediators and the union would be threatening a strike.
Although motherhood is one of the most remanding roles many of us will ever undertake, in the same breath, it is also one of the most rewarding.
While at face value Mother’s Day represents an annual opportunity to thank our mums for all their tireless dedication, it’s also a great opportunity for mums to take a step back and see themselves from their children’s perspectives.
When those little eyes look up at you, they see perfection. When those little hands reach out to hold you, they see your strength. In this one little person’s eyes, heart and mind, you are their world.
Although motherhood can be a thankless task a lot of the time and time to reflect is a luxury many simply don’t have, to those small humans you are enough, you are important and you are worthy.
To all the mums – and mums to be – out there, happy Mother’s Day from the Metropol team. Job well done.

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: on getting teary-eyed at the M Factor Events for Ronald McDonald fashion show

Tears may not be what you’d expect from one of the city’s most covetable fashion shows. But when the benefactor of the event is a worthy charitable cause such as Ronald McDonald House South Island, which has supported the likes of Paula and Alex Moore, it’s not surprising there wasn’t a dry eye in the room.

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

When their daughter Grace was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour, the Moore family – including Grace’s twin sister Sophie and younger brother Beau – spent 133 nights at Ronald McDonald House.
The annual M Factor Fashion Show is one of the organisation’s primary fundraising drives each year, which enables it to continue the tireless crusade to support families when they need it the most. More than $65,000 was raised for the charity on the night at this year’s event.
It’s an event that organiser Maree Lucas from M Factor Events puts heart and soul into. She was joined on stage for the opening address by her twin nieces. Born prematurely, one with a hole in her heart, they spent time at Starship and her family stayed at Ronald McDonald House to be close to them while they underwent treatment.
It was a special night for a special cause and Metropol would like to personally thank all of the incredible people that supported this event in some way, shape or form.
We look at the charity’s next major fundraiser on page 10. Enjoy.

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: on love, marriage and weddings

“He felt now that he was not simply close to her, but that he did not know where he ended and she began,” Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Whether it’s tying the knot, getting hitched, or simply taking one’s hand, when it comes to unions, there’s something pretty special about the one that links two people together in marriage.
It’s a union which has crossed the social, geographical, religious, cultural, economic and gender divides, with evidence of its existence tracing back to almost the beginning of civilisation itself.
Recognised in some way shape or form in almost every society since the beginning of time, it was born from the need to secure a safe environment in which to breed, handle the granting of property rights and protect bloodlines.
And yet despite the inherent practicalities behind its formation, marriage has always had love and romance at its very heart.
The engagement ring – a custom dating back to Ancient Rome – is believed to represent eternal love and is based on the belief that a vein or nerve ran directly from the ‘ring’ finger of the left hand straight to the heart.
There are few areas of modern day life which are as strongly influenced by such ancient customs and traditions as those which relate to the ‘big day’. And yet, despite this, never before have weddings been injected with the degree of personality as what they are today.
So if you’re planning your nuptials, you may wish to let tradition be your guide, but make sure you let your personality shine through too. After all, it may just be one day, but it’s one day that you will remember for the rest of your life.

– Love the Metropol team

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: On creativity and good old fashioned kiwi ingenuity

“Imagination is more important than knowledge,” Albert Einstein

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Creativity can be an elusive beast at times. Yes some have been known to exchange band-width for tricks of the trade, of which digital page after page can be discovered when writer’s block has well and truly taken hold however, this is by no means fool proof.
Sometimes, no matter how much you persevere, it seems inspiration has completely flown the nest and no manner of coaxing will get her back.
Though I’m not sure what excuses I have, after all, we’re certainly not short of inspiration on a local level. Cantabrians have been the creators of world-changing concepts, creations and contraptions and, although the ability to innovate and think outside the square isn’t by any means limited to Christchurch, our city’s creative core is certainly a strong example of the kind of clever us Kiwis are truly capable of.
Although not new by any stretch, having been founded in 1995 – with a parent company which is even older still – Untouched World is a leading example of this innovative thinking.
From a sheep farming family in Canterbury, founder Peri Drysdale has created a brand which is turning heads on a global stage. By focussing on innovative blends of fibres such as merino, possum fur, silk and cashmere, Peri is now one of the country’s most successful entrepreneurs, with the sustainability frontrunner recently being inducted into the New Zealand Hall of Fame.
But it’s far from the only example. Businesses both big and small are making their mark on the city. Metropol continues its 20-year tradition of showcasing the very best of Canterbury, from the intangible strength of spirit of its inhabitants to exceptional innovation in business, building and the vision our leaders have for the city’s future.

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

Editor’s Perspective: On feminism and changing perceptions

“The higher you go, the fewer women there are,” – Wangari Maathai.

Metropol Editor Melinda Collins
Metropol Editor Melinda Collins

A university lecturer once asked me and a group of my female peers how many of us were feminists. One hand of the 12 present went up. That was just seven years ago; 118 years after women got the vote, 92 years after women were allowed to stand for parliament and 78 years after the first woman was elected into parliament.
Somewhere between the brave and radical women’s rights campaigners of the late 1800s and post 1980s, it seems to have become uncool to be a feminist.
Feminism by definition is simply the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.
Yet, according to the World Economic Forum’s 2017 Gender Gap Report, gender parity is still more than 200 years away.
Men and women are different. We have different biological abilities, different hormones and we look – for the most part – different. There are slightly more women in the world than men – 52 percent of the population are women. And yet, most of the positions of power are occupied by men. In quite a literal sense, men rule the world.
This made sense 1000 years ago when physical strength was one of the key determinants of survival. But we live in a very different world now, one where creativity, intelligence and innovation are equal determinants of success.
Earlier this month we celebrated International Women’s Day. It’s one day a year where we reflect on the economic, political and social achievements of women. And, while it may not be ‘cool’ to identify as a feminist, as my university lecturer pointed out that day, why wouldn’t you?