metropol » old » business

Tag: business

Quality Laundry Services

Your local laundry: Quality Laundry Services

American comedienne Phyllis Diller is famously said to have quipped “I’ve buried a lot of my laundry in the back yard”. Rather than Christchurch businesses having to resort to that radical means of dealing with soiled articles Quality Laundry Services Ltd offers a personalised package – pick-up, laundering and drop-off. No need to take the staffroom tea towels home to wash. They will come back pristine clean, folded and ironed.

Quality Laundry Services

Owner Paul Gray says Quality Laundry Services is a small business doing work for other small businesses. “We like to stay small and personal. Clients really like that and our helpful staff members, many of whom have been in the laundry business for years and years. Our company began back in 1995 so we do know a thing or two about washing and ironing and how to treat each and every item. We can handle whatever businesses send our way – from table clothes and napkins for cafés and restaurants, overalls, uniforms and high-viz vests for construction and the trades, or towels and sheets for motels.”
Quality Laundry Services uses specially-formulated eco-friendly laundry products which allow them to achieve perfect results at lower temperatures, saving energy and cutting out potentially harmful chemicals at the same time. Stain removal is a specialty, without resorting to colour-fading bleach. The largest of the company’s washing machine fleet manages a massive 70kg load and the Huebsch dryers automate the perfect drying time.
Visit www.qualitylaundry.co.nz to see a complete list of services. Email qualitylaundryservices@gmail.com or phone 03-374 2188.

Cameron Bailey

On top of the world: We chat to the number one Harcourts sales consultant in the world who just happens to be Christchurch’s very own Cameron Bailey

Cameron Bailey has been awarded the number one Harcourts sales consultant in the world and is also thrilled that the company he is part owner in has had its Papanui office announced as the top office for Harcourts out of over 800 offices globally. Metropol talks to Cameron about the 15 years of dedication behind the accolade.

Cameron Bailey

What attracted you to real estate?

I’ve always been a people person and prior to real estate I was working in hospitality – restaurants and cafés. I’ve always loved property since buying my first home at 20. The longer I’m in real estate, the more I realise it’s about the people and not the houses. I see a real estate agent as the middle man negotiating fair value between sellers and buyers. Building rapport and trust with both sides gets the deal done.

How do you get to be the No 1 Harcourts salesperson in the world?!

I’ve only achieved this accolade twice in a fifteen-year career. I think people see the award but don’t realise there’s fifteen years of hard work behind it to get there. I also have an amazing team of sales consultants and personal assistants that I work with who drive the business behind me. In this marketplace the successful agents are backed by a team, so they can provide better service and better support than a lone ranger agent.

What has been your recipe for success in the real estate space?

As I’ve said before, work ethic is always the basis for success but after fifteen years in the industry I bring to the table a lot of experience and credibility. In a tighter marketplace the credibility of the agent representing your property can mean extra money when it comes to the sale price. I always like to think that we’ve been ahead of the trends and other agents follow us and look at us for what to do in the market.

What does a day in your life look like?

Monday to Friday my alarm goes off at 5am. I go to the gym at 6am, breakfast at 7:30am, arrive at the office at 8:15am, I am in and out of appointments all day and I am constantly on the phone in between appointments. Usually I finish the work day after 8pm, or even later if I’m negotiating a deal or appraising a property. Saturdays and Sundays, I work both days and usually do 12-14 open homes for the weekend. Real estate is a lifestyle, not a job.

Besides from real estate what else are you passionate about?

I have two beautiful identical twin girls that are now seven, I try and spend as much time with them as I can and our favourite place to go for a quick week away is Fiji. I also try to lead a healthy lifestyle, I’m a fitness fanatic and I’m obsessed with eating healthy food. I’m trying to eat a keto based diet at the moment. I love travelling and I try to have some down time overseas a couple of times a year with South America being on the hit list in the near future. I’m also a car enthusiast; I’ve loved cars since I was a kid.

Any words to live by?

One of my favourite quotes at the moment is, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy” – Martin Luther King.

Aaron Pero

Forging his own path: Q&A with real estate whizz Aaron Pero

It can be a hard road growing up in the shadow of a big name, but Aaron Pero has stepped up to the commercial party and forged a career path all of his own. Metropol talks to the real estate whizz about his new career.

Aaron Pero
Aaron and Sophie Pero

Can you tell us a bit about your foray into real estate and what attracted you to this career path?

When I was 14 I developed a website for a New York Times bestselling property author and since then I’ve continued working with investors, developers and real estate agents with marketing and technology. I was the Marketing & IT Manager at my father’s real estate company for two and a half years before going back on my own to work with developers and agents in real estate marketing. It was a natural progression.

You grew up with a very high profile father, what influence did this have on your career path?

I spent most of my childhood in Wellington with my mum but there was no escaping the Mike Pero Mortgages jingle which kids would recite at school on a daily basis, so I guess I was always destined to be connected to property! I would fly down to Christchurch during school holidays and spent time in my father’s office. When I was 19 I moved back down to Christchurch and started working for a property investor as an unpaid intern, then went on to work in my father’s aviation technology business. I’ve been lucky to have had those opportunities which all shaped my career.

How difficult was the decision to go with a completely different company?

It was easy. I respect what my father has been able to build in real estate but wanted to take my own path and build a business of my own, which he understands. Good friends of mine, Sarah and Hamish Mcleod, bought the Halswell Harcourts office last year and a conversation in February resulted in me completing my real estate papers, obtaining my licence and getting a desk at the office the following month. They are incredibly supportive and have a wealth of knowledge and experience. I couldn’t ask for better managers. Being backed by the Grenadier franchise means I have a lot of resources at my disposal and the Harcourts brand is an amazing asset.

You’re a bit of an entrepreneur. Can you tell us about some of your other ventures?

On Valentine’s Day 2011 I started an online divorce business with a friend of mine to help people finalise their separations and move on. The Christian group Family First criticised us for being destructive and the publicity they gave us got us on TV3 news, Seven Days, radio and in most newspapers around the country. We received 150,000 hits on our website in a day.
More recently I created software for real estate agents called AgentSend. It helps agents deliver property documents to potential buyers and track their interest while also keeping the property at the top of the buyer’s mind by showing them ads across a network of more than two million websites. The software is used by agents from all brands around New Zealand, including myself!

What do you love about Christchurch?

I love that it’s both a major city and small town at the same time. There are plenty of opportunities and things happening, but people are still friendly and there’s a real sense of community. I think it’s an exciting place to live, we are lucky to have local developers and businesses willing to invest in our city and make it the wonderful town that it is.

What are some of your favourite city haunts or things to do in the weekends?

I’m a big fan of Victoria Street: Louis, Sister Kong and Dirty Land. I’m also really enjoying The Terrace – it’s great to be back dining there again and it’s come back better than ever. I look forward to Saturday mornings when my wife and I grab Posh Porridge at the Riccarton House Farmer’s Market before taking our dog Ruby to Halswell Quarry.

McFadden Accounting

Accounting magic: Jason McFadden from McFadden Accounting is back with more great advice on simplifying your book-keeping

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic,” Arthur C Clarke once said. Thankfully, if you are struggling with your small business paperwork, you can now pack away your Gandalf robes because Jason McFadden of McFadden Accounting says that advanced technology is now both mainstream and user-friendly when it comes to accounting software.

McFadden Accounting
Jason McFadden

Approaching wizard status himself, Jason has seen the rise and rise of technology in his 30 years of accounting and remembers the day the first computer came through the corporate front door.
Now IRD is front-footing technology and, from 1 April 2018, will require businesses to electronically file their pay roll on every employee payday of the year.
The most popular accounting software packages are available for about $600 per annum. You or your accountant can run it, or a combination of you both. The cost can be offset through time saved at your accountant, but it depends on your business as to whether it really is a cost effective and suitable choice. “Firstly, always talk to your accountant before you decide to buy,” Jason says.
There are different features available, and part-time, low-transaction, or no-staff businesses can often do very well sticking with a simple cash book, while others keep organised with Excel.
Secondly, if you do purchase, get your accountant to help set it up for your business. Finally, learn how to use it properly and code transactions accurately, Jason says. “The principle of garbage in garbage out is fundamental to success with your software.”

McHargs

Built to last: After 125 years local book-binders and print finishers McHargs have certainly become masters of their field

Business has existed in some form since the early barter systems of ancient civilisations. Yet despite the long history, few have mastered the key to corporate longevity.

McHargs
Johnny, Debs, Jo and Tim McHarg

As local family owned business McHargs celebrates 125 years in the print finishing industry, it’s clear this is one business that has truly been built to last.
Established in 1893 by Samuel Irvine McHarg, it is one of the oldest businesses in Christchurch still owned and operated by the founding family, an illustrious occasion which was marked with a cocktail party last month for 150 clients, suppliers, staff and friends.
A well-known identity in the New Zealand industry, Stuart McHarg has run the business since he was 18 years old and continues to work in the business with his wife Christine.
Their sons – the fourth generation of McHargs – General Manager Johnny McHarg and Factory Manager Tim McHarg, continue to run the business, which offers traditional book binding and the largest commercial print finishing operation in New Zealand.
Moving with the times has enabled McHargs to stay ahead of the commercial game and, during the past three decades it has become fully automated, using modern folding, collating, guillotining, stapling, wiro and perfect binding, with continual investment in the latest machinery supporting these abilities.
Binding and restoring books is a tradition and a skill which has earned the company recognition at the highest levels in the country, including supreme runner up at the Pride in Print Awards for a fully cased Christchurch earthquake book in 2017.
McHargs is bound by tradition but equipped for the future. Visit
www.mchargs.co.nz.

Cleaning

Call in the cleaning pros: tops tips to choosing a professional cleaning firm

‘Let your fingers do the walking’ was once the catchcry of calling in the professionals and, although our fingers are now doing the walking in a directory of the digital kind, the premise behind this concept remains true. Sometimes the professionals really are the way to go.

Cleaning

Methamphetamine, animal waste, insect infestations, mould, industrial accidents, contaminated batts, crime scenes, death and odour are all scenarios where your home and health can benefit from the safety and security of a professional eye.
At its simplest, a professional cleaning firm is highly experienced, with the products and techniques to tackle any manner of mess. While at face value, this provides a tidy space for you to get on with life, at a deeper level it gives the safety that comes from professionally removing germs and pathogens that risk your health.
Cleaning is, after all, not always a one size fits all affair and turning a professional hand over to this job can ensure your service is customised to your needs and it can be as simple or as thorough as you choose.
Although the state of cleanliness can be somewhat subjective, varying at least in some degree from person to person, what’s more objective are the sanitation practices and procedures that a professional cleaner adheres to, in order to keep your space germ free.
After all, they make it their business to keep your business clean.

McFadden Accounting

A taxing affair: McFadden Accounting takes the pain out of tax time

Rumour has it the Beatles got taxed at 94 percent in the UK in 1963, rousing George Harrison to write the heartfelt lyrics, ‘Now my advice for those who die, declare the pennies on your eyes…. yeah, I’m the taxman, and you’re working for no one but me’.

McFadden Accounting
Jason McFadden

We haven’t reached 94 percent in New Zealand, but according to Jason McFadden of McFadden Accounting, the New Zealand system is so complex, “people are often paying more tax than they need”.
Take Portfolio Investment Entities (PIE) and KiwiSaver, taxed at a discounted rate determined by your income band. People nominate the tax rate at the outset: if you set your tax rate too high and pay too much, you won’t get the excess tax back; set the rate too low and you have to include your PIE or KiwiSaver income in your tax return – you’ll be taxed in your income band and lose the discounted rate. “A rate set too high or too low sees you penalised. It is quite a prevalent problem,” Jason says.
Buy a new mortgaged home and rent out your retained mortgage-free house, then no claim on mortgage interest payments is possible. However, sell the renter into a company which raises the mortgage, and that company can claim a tax deduction for the interest. Jason says you will incur conveyancing costs, but you can be better off longer term.
With 26 years’ experience, Jason offers a competitive service, travelling to you to see where, why, and how you operate. Jason can see you promptly throughout Christchurch and North Canterbury.

Priority Communications

Creative marketing and communications: the team behind Priority Communications tells us how to stay relevant to customers in a modern world

The average person scrolls through more than 20 metres of content on their smartphone or computer each day – sometimes in just one sitting.

Priority Communications

So it’s more important than ever for businesses to be creative and highly strategic in how they market themselves and communicate with the people that matter to them.
That’s where the team at Priority Communications comes in. This talented crew are experts in creating engaging content and helping organisations communicate at their very best with customers, staff and others.
“Often businesses don’t have the budget to have an in-house public relations team. We’ll work with them to create a marketing communications strategy and then assist them to put it in place,” Priority Communications Director Michele Hider says.
“Several of our clients see us as an extension of their team, asking us to look after everything from their website and social media presence to engaging with media, producing their marketing material and supporting them with crisis communications.
“Others have us on board for one-off campaigns or distinct pieces of work such as writing their annual report, developing a new website or microsite, organising an event, or liaising with the media over a special issue.”
The Priority Comms team are a friendly, down-to-earth bunch, who are just as comfortable meeting clients at home or on a farm, as in a corporate setting. Between them they have backgrounds and qualifications in public relations, journalism, broadcasting and community relations. They work alongside local, well-respected partners for graphic design, web development, photography and videography.
“The first impression people have of your business stems from your marketing and communications, so it is important to do it well,” Michele says. “We get enormous satisfaction out of watching our clients grow and thrive.”

AWESOME HQ, PHOTO BY PEANUT PRODUCTIONS

Savvy shared spaces: fourteen awesome places to co-work in Christchurch

Christchurch is embracing the burgeoning international trend of co-working, with savvy businesses snapping up shared spaces throughout the city. Whether you’re a freelancer, entrepreneur, start-up or community group, the clever co-working concept is creative Christchurch at its best.

AWESOME HQ, PHOTO BY PEANUT PRODUCTIONS
AWESOME HQ, PHOTO BY PEANUT PRODUCTIONS

Evil Genius Bar & Lair
Unit B, 1091 Ferry Road
Described as a café, bar and co-working space for ‘outcasts, geniuses, mavericks and misanthropes looking for a cool spot to work, eat and drink… not necessarily in that order’.

Regus
6 Hazeldean Road Addington and Awly Building, 287-293 Durham Street
A statement office, friendly coworking space to hire, a buzzing business lounge and meeting rooms with all mod cons – it’s all here to rent between these two innovative spaces.

ARGO
215 Marine Parade, New Brighton
‘An ecosystem of passionate and driven professionals’, offering desks, an event space, meeting room, parking, in-house events and networking, with beach views and surfboard storage!

Christchurch Community House
301 Tuam St, Christchurch Central
Run by a group of non-profit organisations committed to modelling a strong, connected community, there’s ‘hot desking’ for community groups, and a range of tenancy options and bookable rooms.

C-Lab
270 St Asaph St, Christchurch Central
Desks and meeting rooms for freelancers, entrepreneurs and start-ups in the vibrant Boxed Quarter laneways, it even has a roof-top balcony.

EPIC
76/106 Manchester St, Christchurch Central
A hub of high-tech digital collaboration for some of New Zealand’s brightest high-tech companies, it has meeting rooms, event spaces, a co-working lounge and hosts interesting speakers every week.

The Boardroom
10 Wakefield Ave, Sumner
A shared space for remote-working Sumner residents, it’s located above the local surf shop, with six permanent desks and one hot desk, available between 9am and 5pm.

GreenHouse
146 Lichfield St, Christchurch Central
An innovation hub for start-ups, scale-ups and small businesses with 40 desks, meeting rooms and an open event space for up to 100, offering tailored support, programmes and events.

Awesome HQ
192 St Asaph St, Christchurch Central
Provided by the Ministry of Awesome, this co-working space is designed to support start-ups, freelancers, small businesses and individuals.

Phillipstown Community Hub
39 Nursery Rd, Phillipstown
Made up of groups working towards developing a more inclusive community, it has three community lounges and several office spaces.

The Collect
Suite 1, Level 1, 185 Manchester St
Offering desks and meeting rooms, its founders wanted to create a home for freelancers, start-ups and entrepreneurs to ‘create a diverse community where our workspace continually inspires us’.

XCHC
376 Wilsons Rd, Waltham
Providing spaces to produce, showcase and share creative works, there’s an onsite licensed café and bar, exhibition and event space, and a loft apartment for visitors and artists in residence.

BizDojo
4 Ash Street, Christchurch Central
There are 150 desks, three meeting rooms and an open event space. Marketed as ‘more than just a desk’, insightful people and programmes are on hand to help businesses grow.

community101
111 Cashel St, Christchurch Central
A free co-working space at BNZ in the CBD offering flexible hot-desks and meeting rooms, available for anyone during business hours.

Peter O'Connor from Ricoh

A sign of what’s to come: Ricoh gives us the run-down on some seriously cool tech (that you can get in your business now)

If you’re still thinking Ricoh only supplies photocopiers, then you really need to unclog your paper jam. The company’s latest addition to its suite of business technology solutions contributes to the most exciting advances in signage since Claude first mass produced neon.

Peter O'Connor from Ricoh
Peter O’Connor from Ricoh demonstrating on a smart screen

Ricoh’s Peter O’Connor says the company’s electronic signage range offers endless possibilities. “Your electronic signage can be as simple or as complex as you want it to be.”
If you’re innovative in business but technology isn’t really your bag; if you don’t know your dongle from your daemon, you can still get into electronic signage in a big way. Ricoh supplies and installs, and Peter can talk you through all the options to find a solution to suit your business needs and level of techno-engagement. The smaller interactive screens operate just like a big iPad on the wall. All the options operate through wireless technology, are cloud-based and require only a wall socket.
At its simplest, electronic signage is an indoor screen, running anything from your latest product range, to staff health and safety procedures in the canteen.
From there the sky really is the limit – there is outdoor signage, you can put a hologram into a shop window or turn a changing room mirror into a sign and touch the screen to overlay different outfits onto yourself. You can have a video wall in your showroom of multiple 98-inch screens banded together seamlessly, and run screens in numerous locations from one spot showing the same or even different information.
Ricoh also supplies OLED flexible glass bent into waves or stunning shapes, with black back colour contrast, so the picture is crystal clear.
A popular option is the interactive touch overlay on a shop window. Real estate agents have found buyers enjoy the ability to swipe a window to view properties of interest, rather than having to wait for old fashioned video to scroll around to a particular house.
For more information or electronic signage tailored to your business, email Peter poconnor@ricoh.co.nz.