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High Tea at The Crowne Plaza Christchurch

A ‘high’ honour: treat mum this mother’s day to a High Tea at The Crowne Plaza Christchurch

You know your mum is a queen – so make sure you treat her like royalty this Mother’s Day with an indulgent high tea in Market Place Restaurant at Crowne Plaza Christchurch!

High Tea at The Crowne Plaza Christchurch

This Mother’s Day, the cosmopolitan Market Place Restaurant will be looking especially stylish, dressed with white tablecloths and filled with beautiful blooms from Bourbon Rose Florist. Music by resident pianist Peter Lewis will complete the superb ambience of the special day.
In addition to a range of sweet and savoury classics gorgeously presented on tiered stands, specialist stations around the restaurant will offer delicious treats including a selection from Cakes By Anna, affogato and iced coffee, a chocolate fountain and a range of T2 teas.
Hotel General Manager Reinier Eulink is upbeat about hosting the first Mother’s Day. “Since opening, Crowne Plaza has been popular with locals celebrating special occasions and we’re excited to add Mother’s Day to our calendar.”
For $49 per person you receive high tea, including a glass of bubbly on arrival, and unlimited coffee and T2 tea, making this deluxe experience the best gift you’ve given mum yet!
There are two afternoon options: 12-1:30pm, or 3-4:30pm and bookings are essential – email laura.clarke1@ihg.com to secure your Mother’s Day spot.

FANTINE AND OVAL OFFICE

All jazzed up: getting excited about the Cavell Leitch New Zealand International Jazz and Blues Festival

New Zealand’s biggest combined jazz and blues event is returning to Christchurch for its 23rd year, with more than 30 shows across five days. Cavell Leitch New Zealand International Jazz and Blues Festival will see international, national and local artists performing in 10 different venues across the city from May 23.

FANTINE AND OVAL OFFICE
FANTINE AND OVAL OFFICE

James Morrison kicks off the festival in the Isaac Theatre Royal on 23 May and international jazz singer Fantine performs two nights of jazz, soul and funk on 24 and 25 May.
Favourite local performers include The Eastern, this year teaming up with local master chef Richard Till for Country Eats, and two great food and music shows on 25 and 26 May at the Lyttelton Arts Factory.
Food, wine and jazz lovers have it all matched up with a three-course southern food dinner menu at Hotel Montreal, accompanied by live music of New Orleans by King Tubbs and wine pairings from award-winning Black Estate, on 24 and 25 May.
For three days Christchurch will be humming to the beat of free music from the River City Jazzmen on the Christchurch Tramway from 12 noon to 2pm on Thursday 24, Friday 25 and Saturday 26 May, while Jazz for lunch at The Piano highlights the sounds and souls of Georgie Clifford and Alice Tanner on 24 and 25 May.
To wrap up, local singer Roslen Ulaula will present a Jill Scott tribute at Christchurch Boys’ High School on 27 May, before the festival after-party jam hits Blue Smoke that evening.
For more information visit jazzbluesfestival.co.nz.

Mike King

Mike King’s mission: this funny family man has tasked himself with making a serious difference to New Zealand’s youth

Popular New Zealand personality Mike King may have made his name as a comedian, but these day’s you’ll find him delivering a much more serious message. He’s been heading up and down the country – a 4000km journey – on a 50cc scooter for the past five years, addressing youth suicide. We talk to the mental health advocate about his personal mission for this very worthy cause.

Mike King

How big is the youth suicide issue in New Zealand?

How long is a piece of string? The issue of suicide across the board is big and how we’re dealing with it needs addressing. Currently those in crisis have to ring ‘this number’ or see ‘this person’. Everything is aimed at the person in crisis; nothing is aimed at the 65/70 percent of the population who have no problems.
People hold onto problems for so long and they’re only being referred when they’re at critical point. We’re trying to promote the fact that it’s ok to talk about small problems before they become big ones and someone becomes suicidal.

You’ve been making your way around the country on 50cc Suzukis to raise awareness, why is it such an important issue for you to tackle?

In February 2013 I spoke at a small rural school in Northland which had lost five children to suicide. I have discovered through this experience that our young people don’t feel like us old people are listening to them.
So we went around schools listening, listening, listening. We discovered that all kids, regardless of religion or colour, have the same problems and they’re not talking about them; they’re holding onto them until they become overwhelming.
Their inner critics, the little voice second guessing all their decisions, are huge. From there we worked out a strategy – help the inner critic; he’s the cornerstone of 9 out of 10 of the mental health problems. We need to normalise the inner critics by changing society’s attitudes.
Last year we discovered that of those who will have a major mental health problem, 80 percent won’t ask for help. They don’t feel safe. The simplest thing we could do is come up with a signifier of someone safe. We created a simple wristband with ‘I am hope’ on it. This says: I won’t judge, shame, gossip, ask stupid questions, try and fix everything for you; all you’ll get from me is unconditional love and hope, but most importantly, if you want to talk to someone, I am here.

What are some of the key ways New Zealand can start to make some ground in this area?

Parents need to know that all kids are born perfect. The only thing that can screw them up is us. We apply all these rules and only give conditional love – if you do this or that, pass this test, then I’ll love you. We can understand the logic of that, because we’re adults, but kids are thinking there must be something wrong with them if they’re not getting unconditional love.
If there’s five things they do, four are good and one is bad, we focus on the bad, what we think we’re saying is ‘we love you, but you can do better’, but what our kids are getting is ‘no matter what I do I can never be good enough’. How we’re speaking to our children becomes an inner voice.
These become little criticisms that mean nothing in isolation, ‘yes you’re an idiot I asked for a screwdriver you bought be a spoon’. But that’s one hell of an inner critic we’re planting in our kids’ heads.

How does it feel to be in a position where you can play such a positive role in raising awareness of issues such as this?

It’s a privileged position. We have to be very responsible; people are placing a lot of trust on our shoulders. We don’t take or accept government funding; we’re funded by the public of New Zealand. A lot of organisations out there take government money and public money. That’s like having a wife and girlfriend; you have to lie to please both. We only take public donations and apply for grants, so the public will let us know when we’re out of a job; it keeps you honest. It’s a cool position to be in.

Petersens Jewellers Bush Inn

Colourful collections inspire: we look at the beautiful jewellery on offer from Petersens Jewellers at Bush Inn

Having an array of beautiful jewellery to choose from is a joy and, for Petersens Jewellers in the Bush Inn Centre, offering it is a privilege.

Petersens Jewellers Bush Inn

Synonymous with high quality brands hailing from as far as Germany, Petersens’ clients benefit from the adventurous and trained eye of owner/operator Brent Morrison who handpicks not only the world-class diamonds on offer, but every range that graces the walls of his sophisticated store.
Brent travels to Antwerp twice a year to personally select his diamonds to ensure every diamond is high quality. Petersens has a range of cuts and carats to suit every budget and is a specialist in bespoke pieces of jewellery.
Brand new to the jeweller – and the only collection currently in Christchurch – is Couer De Lion. Timeless and season-transcending, the brand new pieces are based on geometrics. Titled ‘geocubes’, the collection has stunning necklaces featuring a combination of stones including Onyx and Swarovski crystal. There are beautiful and different textures created by these stones and striking colours that create a different looking accent with every different outfit you pair them with.
From soft teal blues inspired by the ocean to pretty pastals like quartz rose through to bold purples, reds and forest greens, Couer De Lion has a colour palette for every preference.
Colour is having its moment across the other collections featuring at Petersens, with the recently released ‘Tropical’ pieces by Thomas Sabo, who has also played with astronomy symbols like stars and taken inspiration from the nautical aesthetic with quirky features like starfish and anchors. Hearts and clovers add a romantic touch.
To discover the truly unique, modern diamonds and precious every day pieces, visit Petersens at Bush Inn Centre, Corner of Waimari Road and Riccarton Road or
www.petersensjewellerschristchurch.co.nz.

Canterbury Jewellers

The finer details: Canterbury Jewellers on choosing the perfect wedding ring

Women of style pay attention to every detail and there are two significant details that will be part of each look you sport, every day of your married life.

Canterbury Jewellers

Reflecting the harmonious union that you and your loved one seal at the altar, your engagement ring and your wedding ring should complement one another, each enhancing the other’s beauty, rather than competing for attention or detracting noisily.

Canterbury Jewellers specialises in creating wedding rings to suit your engagement ring. Second generation Jeweller Jason Baylis says, “However unique your engagement ring, we focus on making your rings look fantastic together, and we try to ensure your wedding ring will look great on its own as well”.
The company’s sketch artist brings your ideas to life on the page, so you know they are going to get it right and your bespoke wedding ring can be ready in as little as a week.

Heritage Hanmer Springs

A romantic backdrop: a wedding at the Heritage Hanmer Springs

When it comes to New Zealand wedding destinations, the romantic mountain views and landscaped gardens of the Heritage Hanmer Springs provide an amazing ceremonial backdrop.

Heritage Hanmer Springs
A landmark venue just 90 minutes from Christchurch, it’s a world away from the ordinary, in a stunning alpine retreat that will captivate you and your guests.
The venue can arrange everything, from tailormade menus, to beverage and staffing needs. There is a fabulous ballroom, complete with open fireplace, or enjoy a stylish and unforgettable lawn wedding in the picturesque gazebo set amongst beautiful gardens.
A range of accommodation is available, including three-bedroom villas located around a charming lake. Guests can enjoy all Hanmer Springs has to offer, including the world famous thermal pools, a short walk across the main street.
If you are looking for elegance, a spectacular location and personalised service, choose Heritage Hanmer Springs.
Email HanmerConf@heritagehotels.co.nz, phone 03-315 0065 or visit
www.heritagehotels.co.nz/hotels/heritage-hanmer-springs.

Artworks Landscape

Now’s the design time: making the most of Autumn with Artwork’s Landscape

Luke Robertson
Luke Robertson, Landscape Designer at Artworks Landscape Ltd

Luke Robertson, Landscape Designer at Christchurch’s celebrated Artworks Landscape Ltd, offers some advice for the enjoyment of spending Christmas and summer in your fabulous outdoor living space: “Just because it’s autumn, don’t put your plans on the back burner until spring – be smart, think ahead. Now is the perfect time to get your design completed so work can commence before the spring rush if you want to be able to enjoy your outside living over the summer.”

Artworks Landscape

Artworks Landscape Ltd has been in Canterbury for 31 years and offers the full service of design, build and maintenance, so can complete your whole project. “Communication flow between our departments means it’s a streamlined process, ensuring continuity between design, construction and maintenance,” Luke says.
Every client has different outdoor space requirements and Luke is driven by the challenge of variety. While he has some favourite design concepts, your outdoor space will be unique to you.
From the sculptural lines of a symmetrical formal garden, to a more relaxed free-form outdoor space, you’ll receive a distinctive, well-serving design and completed product that works for you.
Artworks Landscape Ltd has a reputation for quality landscapes on time and to any budget. The benefits in using Artworks, is that it offers the full package. Whether you need a paved area, or an integrated design complete with swimming pool, Artworks can help. Phone 03-387 0673 or enquire through www.artworkslandscape.co.nz

Magic Mirror

Elegant event photos: Magic Mirror’s themed photo booths are the fun extra you need on your wedding day

Encompassing incredible technology, Magic Mirror is a stand out from other photo booth offerings, with this voice activated mirror and touch screen making quite the experience.

Magic Mirror
The VIP set up is personalised with either red or black carpet and your choice of glamourous sequinned backdrop. An attendant is on hand, so you don’t have to worry about changing settings or loading printer paper throughout the night. A personalised logo and a range of styles to suit your theme mean your event is commemorated properly, including personalised touch screens with dates and bride/groom names.
Magic Mirror offers extras like unlimited printing, amazing personalised guest books (from Auckland store ‘Down Memory Lane’). There are also 200+ animations and a comprehensive table of props. Aside from the elegance Magic Mirror brings, it’s easy to overlook the benefit so obvious you almost miss it: being a mirror you can fix your hair and makeup before the photo!

Photography by Johannes van Kan

An arty restoration: Photographer Johannes van Kan captures The Arts Centre coming back to life

Home to one of the most significant collections of heritage buildings in New Zealand, The Arts Centre is a must visit for fans of beautiful architecture – particularly those with an interest in the distinctive Gothic Revival style.

Photography by Johannes van Kan
Photography by Johannes van Kan

Photographer Johannes van Kan had front row seats to the buildings’ extensive restoration after they suffered extensive damage in the Canterbury earthquakes.

Did you have any ties to The Arts Centre prior to this project?

I had previously photographed events and people around The Arts Centre but nothing actually for The Arts Centre itself.

Photography by Johannes van Kan
Photography by Johannes van Kan

What was it like having the freedom to observe the restoration through your lens rather than being told specifically what to photograph?

The freedom allowed me to be expressive. It allowed me to discover images. It was unique as an opportunity and I was very fortunate to be part of it.

Photography by Johannes van Kan
Photography by Johannes van Kan

A lot of the images displayed in your exhibition at Pūmanawa earlier this year were black and white – what was the reason behind that?

Black and white imagery has a simplicity that is very much about using light to tell a story without the complications of colour. Actually, my biggest bugbear was orange cones.

 

Do you think the public understands the amount of work going into the restoration at The Arts Centre?

I would be surprised if many people had a full idea of what’s really involved. It is a huge project made up of many parts with many experts bringing everything together. There were unique skills like lead working and heritage masonry work, combined with modern engineering technology. There were multiple construction companies dealing with complicated strengthening and restoration. If there was another earthquake, I would go to The Arts Centre to be safe.

Did you learn some interesting stories about the buildings or tenants who used to occupy them?

The Arts Centre is full of stories of what people used to do there. The stories I was most interested in were those told by what was left behind in the spaces immediately after the earthquakes.

Photography by Johannes van Kan
Photography by Johannes van Kan

What were some of the challenges of shooting photographs on an active worksite?

Being aware of health and safety was the main one. There was dust everywhere and changing lenses was always a concern. Working in this environment is all about respect. It was important that I had as little impact as possible on the imagery aside from being the observer.

Did you gain an understanding of the stonemasons’ craft?

To understand stonemasonry, you need to wield the tools. You need to strike the stone with chisels. You need to cut, lift, sweat and breathe in the dust – through a mask, of course. I saw what they did and was aware of the care they took but it would take a lot more to understand stonemasonry.

The Butcher’s Mistress

A beautiful butchery: The Butcher’s Mistress is the darling of Rangiora

Beautiful and sophisticated may not be the words you would associate with your local butcher, but then there are few similarities between The Butcher’s Mistress and most others of its kind.

The Butcher’s Mistress

Halena Hitchcock opened the doors of the store in Rangiora’s High Street in October last year and, although the physical store is still in a period of transformation, it’s already clear the attention to detail she brings to the commercial table.
Having been in the industry for twelve years, she recognises the part breeding, health and wellbeing play in creating quality, tasty meat, sourcing off the hoof as much as possible and from farms throughout North Canterbury.
“Traceability is important to me – knowing the animal has come from a top local farm and has been well cared for,” Halena says.
Along with a team of butchers, she offers an exceptional array of locally sourced meat – lamb, hogget and beef, old fashioned dry cured bacon, free-farmed pork, South Island venison and goat, as well as organic Washcreek lamb. For the kids, there’s the ever-popular crumbed sausages, but its high quality gourmet sausages is where The Butcher’s Mistress excels.
“To shop at a butchery means personal care,” Halena says.
“We pay close attention to personal tastes and portion control for families of all sizes.”
Homekill and wild game processing are also available. Halena and her team can guide you through the cuts, hanging time and small goods which best suit your needs. “We’re passionate about what we do and if someone comes in the door, we will do what it takes to source what they want.”
The Butcher’s Mistress, 84 High St Rangiora, phone 03-313 7191.